Catalogue


The witches of Abiquiu : the governor, the priest, the Genízaro Indians, and the Devil /
Malcolm Ebright & Rick Hendricks ; illustrations by Glen Strock.
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2006.
description
xvi, 344 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0826320317 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780826320315 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2006.
isbn
0826320317 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780826320315 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Abiquiu, the middle ground : the cross and the petroglyph -- The Genizaros -- The priest : Fray Juan José Toledo -- The governor : Tomás Vélez Cachupín -- The Abiquiu Genízaro land grant : its settlement and early history -- Witchcraft trials in colonial New Mexico and on the northern frontier -- The witchcraft proceedings : phase one : el cojo -- The witchcraft proceedings : phase two : Joaquinillo, el descubridor -- The devil -- The witchcraft proceedings : phase three : the exorcisms -- The witchcraft proceedings : phase four : the Inquisition's response and punishment of the Genízaros -- Conclusion : Abiquiu witchcraft : resistance, revitalization, and a clash of beliefs -- New identities at Abiquiu -- List of accused sorcerers -- Abiquiu Genízaro land grant, 1754.
catalogue key
6048338
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 323-333) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-04-01:
This is a fascinating account of the last major witch craze in North America. It occurred in the village of Abiquiu on the northern New Mexican frontier in 1756 and pitched three major characters against each other. The Genizaro Indians were former Indian slaves from various tribal backgrounds (primarily Pawnee, Apache, Kiowa, and Jumano) who used witchcraft in an act of resistance to forced Christianization, socioeconomic pressures, and an imposed sedentary lifestyle. Priest Juan Jose Toledo, who was charged with converting the Genizaros to Christianity, was unable to distinguish between healers (curanderos) and witches (hechiceros) and saw the devil's handiwork in all forms of Native religious expression; this prompted him to unleash a series of exorcisms that threatened to unravel his community. Governor Tomas Velez Cachupin finally was charged with maintaining calm on the frontier. He needed the Genizaro Indians to protect the border against Comanche and Ute incursions, but he was also responsible for "civilizing" them. Through tact and diplomacy, Cachupin was able to defuse the situation. Although at times repetitive, this book provides a wonderful peek into the complex multiethnic cultural landscape of an 18th-century borderlands community. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. M. J. Van de Logt Indiana University Bloomington
Reviews
Review Quotes
""The Witches of Abiquiu" authors Malcolm Ebright and Rick Hendricks tell a mind-boggling tale of witches, sorcery, spells, exorcism, curses, and battles with the Devil during the establishment of the Abiquiu Genizaro land grant between 1756 and 1766..this solidly researched and meticulously documented story reveals a time of social conflict and culture clash during one of New Mexico's most interesting historical periods."
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The author focuses on the little studied witchcraft trial that took place at Abiquiu, New Mexico, between 1756 and 1766. The witchcraft outbreak took place less than a century after the Pueblo Revolt and symbolised a resistance by the Genizaros (hispanicized Indians) of Abiquiu to forced Christianization.
Long Description
The little-studied witchcraft trial that took place at Abiquiu, New Mexico, between 1756 and 1766 is the centerpiece of this book. The witchcraft outbreak took place less than a century after the Pueblo Revolt and symbolized a resistance by the Genizaros (hispanicized Indians) of Abiquiu to forced Christianization. The Abiquiu Genizaro land grant where the witchcraft outbreak occurred was the crown jewel of Governor Velez Cachupin's plan to achieve peace for the early New Mexican colonists. They were caught between the Pueblo Indians' resistance to Christianization and raids by the nomadic indio barbaros that threatened the existence of the colony. Thanks mainly to the governor's strategy, peace was achieved with the Comanches and Utes, the Pueblo Indians retained their religious ceremonies, and the Abiquiu Pueblo land grant survived and flourished. "The Witches of Abiquiu" is the story of a polarizing event in New Mexico history equal in importance to the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692.
Main Description
The little-studied witchcraft trial that took place at Abiquiu, New Mexico, between 1756 and 1766 is the centerpiece of this book. The witchcraft outbreak took place less than a century after the Pueblo Revolt and symbolised a resistance by the Genizaros (hispanicized Indians) of Abiquiu to forced Christianization. The Abiquiu Genizaro land grant where the witchcraft outbreak occurred was the crown jewel of Governor Velez Cachupin's plan to achieve peace for the early New Mexican colonists. They were caught between the Pueblo Indians' resistance to Christianity and raids by the nomadic indio barbaros that threatened the existence of the colony. Thanks mainly to the governor's strategy, peace was achieved with the Comanches and Utes, the Pueblo Indians retained their religious ceremonies, and the Abiquiu Pueblo land grant survived and flourished. 'The Witches of Abiquiu' is the story of a polarising event in New Mexico history equal in importance to the Salem witchcraft trials of 1692.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Parties to Witchcraft Proceedingsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
A Note on Stylep. xvi
Introductionp. 1
Abiquiu, the Middle Ground: The Cross and the Petroglyphp. 11
The Genizarosp. 27
The Priest: Fray Juan Jose Toledop. 49
The Governor: Tomas Velez Cachupinp. 65
The Abiquiu Genizaro Land Grant: Its Settlement and Early Historyp. 89
Witchcraft Trials in Colonial New Mexico and on the Northern Frontierp. 107
The Witchcraft Proceedings: Phase One: El Cojop. 119
The Witchcraft Proceedings: Phase Two: Joaquinillo, El Descubridorp. 135
The Devilp. 161
The Witchcraft Proceedings: Phase Three: The Exorcismsp. 179
The Witchcraft Proceedings: Phase Four: The Inquisition's Response and Punishment of the Genizarosp. 221
Conclusion: Abiquiu Witchcraft: Resistance, Revitalization, and a Clash of Beliefsp. 235
Epilogue: New Identities at Abiquiup. 251
List of Accused Sorcerersp. 262
Abiquiu Genizaro Land Grant, 1754p. 269
Notesp. 273
Glossaryp. 321
Works Citedp. 323
Indexp. 334
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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