Catalogue


Principles of polymer processing /
Roger T. Fenner. --
edition
1st American ed. --
imprint
New York : Chemical Publishing, 1980, c1979.
description
xv, 176 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
082060285X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
subject
More Details
imprint
New York : Chemical Publishing, 1980, c1979.
isbn
082060285X
catalogue key
6045762
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
First Chapter
Preface



The increasing use of synthetic polymers in preference to metals and other

engineering materials for a wide range of applications has been accompanied by the

development and improvement of processes for converting them into useful

products. Indeed, it is often the comparative ease and cheapness with which

polymeric materials can be processed that make them attractive choices. Because

of the relatively complex behaviour of the materials, polymer processes may appear

to be difficult to understand and analyze quantitatively.

The purposes of this book are to introduce the reader briefly to the main

methods of processing thermoplastic polymers, and to examine the principles of

flow and heat transfer in some of the more industrially important of these processes.

Much attention is devoted to the two most widely used methods - screw extrusion

and injection moulding. Quantitative analyses based on mathematical models of the

processes are developed in order to aid the understanding of them, and to improve

both the performance and design of processing equipment. In addition to algebraic

formulae, some worked examples are included to illustrate the use of the results

obtained. In cases where analytical solutions are not possible, methods of numerical

solution using digital computers are discussed in some detail, and typical results

presented.

This book is partly based on courses given by the author to both undergraduate

and postgraduate students of mechanical and chemical engineering at Imperial

College. The level of continuum mechanics and mathematics employed is that

normally taught in undergraduate engineering courses. Although tensor notation is

introduced for conciseness in presenting general continuum mechanics equations

(in chapter 4), no prior knowledge is assumed, and it is not used in the later

practical applications. The book is therefore suitable for engineering undergraduates

and postgraduates, and other students at equivalent levels. Practising polymer

engineers may also find it useful.

The author wishes to acknowledge the contributions made by many colleagues,

students and technical staff to the work on polymer processing at Imperial College,

on which this book is firmly based. Much of the material concerned with cable-covering-

crosshead design presented in chapter 5 is drawn from the current work of

Mrs F. Nadiri. The very skillful typing services of Miss E. A. Quin are also gratefully

acknowledged.

Imperial College of Science and Technology,

London

ROGER T. FENNER
Summaries
Main Description
Contents - Preface - Notation - 1. Introduction - 1.1 Polymeric Materials - 1.2 Polymer Processing - 1.3 Analysis of Polymer Processes - 1.4 Scope of the Book - 2. Introduction to the Main Polymer Processes - 2.1 Screw Extrusion - 2.2 Injection Moulding - 2.3 Blow Moulding - 2.4 Calendering - 2.5 Other Processes - 2.6 Effects of Processing - 3. Processing Properties of Polymers - 3.1 Melting and Thermal Properties of Polymers - 3.2 Viscous Properties of Polymer Melts - 3.3 Methods of Measuring Melt Viscosities - 3.4 Elastic Properties of Polymer Melts - 3.5 Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Melt Properties - 3.6 Processing Properties of Solid Polymers - 4. Fundamentals of Polymer Melt Flow - 4.1 Tensor Notation - 4.2 Continuum Mechanics Equations - 4.3 Constitutive Equations - 4.4 Boundary Conditions - 4.5 Dimensional Analysis of Melt Flows - 4.6 The Lubrication Approximation - 4.7 Mixing in Melt Flows - 5. Some Melt Flow Processes - 5.1 Some Simple Extrusion Dies - 5.2 Narrow Channel Flows in Dies and Crossheads - 5.3 Applications to Die Design - 5.4 Calendering - 5.5 Melt Flow in an Intensely Sheared Thin Film - 6. Screw Extrusion - 6.1 Melt Flow in Screw Extruders - 6.2 Solids Conveying in Extruders - 6.3 Melting in Extruders - 6.4 Power Consumption in Extruders - 6.5 Mixing in Extruders - 6.6 Surging in Extruders - 6.7 Over-all Performance and Design of Extruders - 7. Injection Moulding - 7.1 Reciprocating Screw Plastication - 7.2 Melt Flow in Injection Nozzles - 7.3 Flow and Heat Transfer in Moulds - Appendix A. Finite Element Analysis of Narrow Channel Flow - Appendix B. Solution of the Screw Channel Developing Melt Flow Equations - Appendix C. Solution of the Melting Model Equations - Further Reading - Index - Preface - The increasing use of synthetic polymers in preference to metals and other engineering materials for a wide range of applications has been accompanied by the development and improvement of processes for converting them into useful products. Indeed, it is often the comparative ease and cheapness with which polymeric materials can be processed that make them attractive choices. Because of the relatively complex behaviour of the materials, polymer processes may appear to be difficult to understand and analyze quantitatively. The purposes of this book are to introduce the reader briefly to the main methods of processing thermoplastic polymers, and to examine the principles of flow and heat transfer in some of the more industrially important of these processes. Much attention is devoted to the two most widely used methods - screw extrusion and injection moulding. Quantitative analyses based on mathematical models of the processes are developed in order to aid the understanding of them, and to improve both the performance and design of processing equipment. In addition to algebraic formulae, some worked examples are included to illustrate the use of the results obtained. In cases where analytical solutions are not possible, methods of numerical solution using digital computers are discussed in some detail, and typical results presented.
Main Description
Contents - Preface - Notation - 1 Introduction - 1.1 Polymeric Materials - 1.2 Polymer Processing - 1.3 Analysis of Polymer Processes - 1.4 Scope of the Book - 2 Introduction to the Main Polymer Processes - 2.1 Screw Extrusion - 2.2 Injection Moulding - 2.3 Blow Moulding - 2.4 Calendering - 2.5 Other Processes - 2.6 Effects of Processing - 3 Processing Properties of Polymers - 3.1 Melting and Thermal Properties of Polymers - 3.2 Viscous Properties of Polymer Melts - 3.3 Methods of Measuring Melt Viscosities - 3.4 Elastic Properties of Polymer Melts - 3.5 Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Melt Properties - 3.6 Processing Properties of Solid Polymers - 4 Fundamentals of Polymer Melt Flow - 4.1 Tensor Notation - 4.2 Continuum Mechanics Equations - 4.3 Constitutive Equations - 4.4 Boundary Conditions - 4.5 Dimensional Analysis of Melt Flows - 4.6 The Lubrication Approximation - 4.7 Mixing in Melt Flows - 5 Some Melt Flow Processes - 5.1 Some Simple Extrusion Dies - 5.2 Narrow Channel Flows in Dies and Crossheads - 5.3 Applications to Die Design - 5.4 Calendering - 5.5 Melt Flow in an Intensely Sheared Thin Film - 6 Screw Extrusion - 6.1 Melt Flow in Screw Extruders - 6.2 Solids Conveying in Extruders - 6.3 Melting in Extruders - 6.4 Power Consumption in Extruders - 6.5 Mixing in Extruders - 6.6 Surging in Extruders - 6.7 Over-all Performance and Design of Extruders - 7 Injection Moulding - 7.1 Reciprocating Screw Plastication - 7.2 Melt Flow in Injection Nozzles - 7.3 Flow and Heat Transfer in Moulds - Appendix A Finite Element Analysis of Narrow Channel Flow - Appendix B Solution of the Screw Channel Developing Melt Flow Equations - Appendix C Solution of the Melting Model Equations - Further Reading - Index -

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