Catalogue


English fiction since 1984 : narrating a nation /
Brian Finney.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
description
vii, 233 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0230008550 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
isbn
0230008550 (cloth)
catalogue key
6045068
 
Includes bibiographical references (p. 205-225) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Brian Finney is an associate professor in English at California State University, Long Beach, USA
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-07-01:
Finney (California State University, Long Beach) examines how 11 novels by as many novelists offer a "shared response to the changing world of the closing years of the millennium." He addresses these novelists in three sections: "History, Modernity, and Metafiction," "National Cultures and Hybrid Narrative Modes," and "Narrative Constructions of Identity." To sample from the contents, the first section includes an analysis of how the reversal of chronology in Martin Amis's holocaust novel Time's Arrow, or, The Nature of the Offense challenges the narrative recovery of the past and avoids the reinscription of atrocity. Part 2 looks at how Hanif Kureshi's The Buddha of Suburbia reveals the intersecting "borders" of racial, ethnic, economic, and sexual identity that locate Britain as a "transnational world-space." The final section includes a discussion of the unnamed, ungendered, bisexual narrator of Jeanette Winterson's Written on the Body, who dislocates identity as a verifiable category and rewrites the body as a site of transformative and reiterable subjectivity. Finney accomplishes an engaging theoretical discussion of authors who were themselves educated in postmodern theories of history, nation, identity, and literature. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-division undergraduates and above. H. E. Osborne Royal Military College of Canada
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
Building on existing surveys of contemporary English fiction, this timely book focuses on key novels by eleven major English novelists who have broken in different ways from the realist British novel of the postwar period without losing their broad appeal among readers. These writers have reacted to the Thatcherite revolution that thrust Britain into the modern world of multinational capitalism by giving unusual fictional shape to the impact of global events and culture, and by experimenting with innovatory narrative modes and fictional techniques to represent the changing world in which they find themselves. This book should be of wide interest to students and instructors of contemporary British fiction. Book jacket.
Long Description
This book focuses on the work of a group of British novelists who have broken in different ways from the realist British novel of the post Second World War period without losing their broad appeal among readers. Authors discussed include Salman Rushdie, A.S. Byatt, Ian McEwan, Angela Carter, Jeanette Winterson and Kazuo Ishiguro. All of these writers have been compelled to seek out new narrative strategies to give appropriate expression to their different responses to a world dominated by global capital and by the media and electronic systems of communication serving its ends.
Description for Bookstore
This book focuses on the work of a group of British novelists who have broken in different ways from the realist British novel of the post Second World War period without losing their broad appeal among readers.
Long Description
Building on existing surveys of contemporary English fiction, this timely book focuses on key novels by eleven major English novelists who have broken in different ways from the realist British novel of the post-War period without losing their broad appeal among readers. These writers have reacted to the Thatcherite revolution that thrust Britain into the modern world of multi-national capitalism by giving unusual fictional shape to the impact of global events and culture, and by experimenting with innovatory narrative modes and fictional techniques to re-present the changing world in which they find themselves. This book should be of wide interest to students and instructors in contemporary British fiction. The novels analyzed are: Angela Carter's Nights at the Circus , Peter Ackroyd's Chatterton , Salman Rushdie's The Satanic Verses , Hanif Kureishi's The Buddha of Suburbia , Martin Amis's Time's Arrow , A. S. Byatt's Angels and Insects , Jeanette Winterson's Written on the Body , Graham Swift's Last Orders , Julian Barnes' A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters , Kazuo Ishiguro's When We Were Orphans , and Ian McEwan's Atonement .
Bowker Data Service Summary
Building on the number of surveys of contemporary British fiction, this book focuses on representative novels by 11 key English novelists who have broken in different ways from the realist British novel of the post Second World War period without losing their broad appeal among readers.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
History, Modernity and Metafictionp. 15
Prefacep. 17
Peter Ackroyd: Chatterton (1987)p. 21
Julian Barnes: A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters (1989)p. 34
Martin Amis: Time's Arrow, or The Nature of the Offense (1991)p. 53
A. S. Byatt: Angels and Insects (1992)p. 68
Ian McEwan: Atonement (2001)p. 87
National Cultures and Hybrid Narrative Modesp. 103
Prefacep. 105
Salman Rushdie: The Satanic Verses (1988)p. 109
Hanif Kureishi: The Buddha of Suburbia (1990)p. 124
Kazuo Ishiguro: When We Were Orphans (2000)p. 139
Narrative Constructions of Identityp. 155
Prefacep. 157
Angela Carter: Nights at the Circus (1984)p. 163
Jeanette Winterson: Written on the Body (1992)p. 177
Graham Swift: Last Orders (1996)p. 191
Notesp. 205
Bibliographyp. 213
Indexp. 226
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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