Onward to the Olympics : historical perspectives on the Olympic Games /
edited by Gerald P. Schaus and Stephen R. Wenn.
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press ; Lancaster : Gazelle Drake Academic [distributor], c2007.
description
xxvii, 376 p. : ill.
ISBN
0889205051 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
Waterloo, Ont. : Wilfrid Laurier University Press ; Lancaster : Gazelle Drake Academic [distributor], c2007.
isbn
0889205051 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6039866
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gerald P. Schaus is a professor of archaeology and Classical studies and former chair of the department at Wilfrid Laurier University, where he also teaches ancient sports. He is publishing the results of Canadian excavations in the Athena Sanctuary Stymphalos (Greece). Stephen R. Wenn is a professor in Wilfrid Laurier University's Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education. He is a co-author of Selling the Five Rings: The IOC and the Rise of Olympic Commercialism (2002).
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-09-01:
Wilfrid Laurier University professors Schaus (archaeology and classical studies) and Wenn (kinesiology and physical education) have collected 13 essays on the ancient Olympics and 10 on its modern counterpart. The topics are eclectic. For example, in the first part, "The Olympics in Antiquity," one learns how scholars have worked to interpret small bits of sometimes-contradictory evidence to piece together the roots and stories of the ancient Olympics and specific subjects such as judging, women, and commemorative coins. In part 2, "The Modern Olympics," topics include the inspiration for the torch relay, womanizing Olympic athletes in the Avery Brundage era, the marriage between the Olympics and business under Juan Antonio Samaranch, and the future of the Olympic movement. Some sections require a love for, and some knowledge of, ancient history; others will oblige the reader to have a dictionary at hand. However, the authors are experts, the essays are neither too short nor too long, and the book is well edited. It will certainly please those fascinated by the Olympics, and it may just captivate some history lovers. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. D. W. Hill University of North Texas
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This item was reviewed in:
Choice, September 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
The Olympic Games have had two lives-the first lasted for a millennium with celebrations every four years at Olympia to honour the god Zeus. The second has blossomed over the past century, from a simple start in Athens in 1896 to a dazzling return to Greece in 2004. Onward to the Olympics provides both an overview and an array of insights into aspects of the Games' history. Leading North American archaeologists and historians of sport explore the origins of the Games, compare the ancient and the modern, discuss the organization and financing of such massive athletic festivals, and examine the participation ,or the troubling lack of it, by women. Onward to the Olympics bridges the historical divide between the ancient and the modern and concludes with a thought-provoking final essay that attempts to predict the future of the Olympics over the twenty-first century.
Bowker Data Service Summary
This volume explores the origins of the ancient games, compares the ancient and the modern, discusses the organisation and financing of the festival, and examines the participation of women. It also looks at the future of the Olympics.
Main Description
The Olympic Games have had two lives--the first lasted for a millennium with celebrations every four years at Olympia to honour the god Zeus. The second has blossomed over the past century, from a simple start in Athens in 1896 to a dazzling return to Greece in 2004. Onward to the Olympics provides both an overview and an array of insights into aspects of the Games' history. Leading North American archaeologists and historians of sport explore the origins of the Games, compare the ancient and the modern, discuss the organization and financing of such massive athletic festivals, and examine the participation ,or the troubling lack of it, by women.
Main Description
The Olympic games have had two lives-the first lasted for a millennium with celebrations every four years at Olympia in Greece to honour the god Zeus. The second has blossomed over the past century, from a simple start in Athens in 1896 to an impressive return to Greece in 2004. Here, leading North American archaeologists and historians of sport explore the origins of the ancient games, compare the ancient and the modern, discuss the organization and financing of such massive athletic festivals, and examine the participation or, more troubling, lack of participation by women. The volume concludes with a provocative essay predicting the future of the Olympics.
Main Description
Explores the origins of the ancient games, compares the ancient and the modern, discusses the organisation and financing of the festival, and examines the participation of women. Also looks at the future of the Olympics.
Main Description
The Olympic Games have had two lives-the first lasted for a millennium with celebrations every four years at Olympia to honour the god Zeus. The second has blossomed over the past century, from a simple start in Athens in 1896 to a dazzling return to Greece in 2004. Onward to the Olympics provides both an overview and an array of insights into aspects of the Games' history. Leading North American archaeologists and historians of sport explore the origins of the Games, compare the ancient and the modern, discuss the organization and financing of such massive athletic festivals, and examine the participation ,or the troubling lack of it, by women.Onward to the Olympics bridges the historical divide between the ancient and the modern and concludes with a thought-provoking final essay that attempts to predict the future of the Olympics over the twenty-first century.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. x
Prefacep. xiii
Introductionp. xvii
List of Abbreviationsp. xxv
The Olympics in Antiquity
An Overview
The Ancient Olympic Games through the Centuriesp. 3
Origins
Politics and the Bronze Age Origins of Olympic Practicesp. 15
Pindar, Heracles the Idaean Dactyl, and the Foundation of the Olympic Gamesp. 27
The First Olympic Gamesp. 47
The Transformation of Athletics in Sixth-Century Greecep. 59
Ideals and Losers
The Ancient Olympics and Their Idealsp. 69
Olympic Losers: Why Athletes Who Did Not Win at Olympia Are Rememberedp. 81
Details of the Festival
Judges and Judging at the Ancient Olympic Gamesp. 95
Heroic and Athletic Sortition at Ancient Olympiap. 115
Fabulous Females and Ancient Olympiap. 131
The Halma: A Running or Standing Jump?p. 153
Another View of Olympia
Connections between Olympia and Stymphalusp. 167
Commemorative Cash: The Coins of the Ancient and Modern Olympicsp. 179
Works Cited in Part Ip. 193
The Modern Olympics
An Overview
The Olympic Games in Modern Timesp. 221
The Olympics Before World War II
Duke Kahanamoku-Olympic Champion and Uncle Sam's Adopted Son: The Cultural Text of a Hawaiian Conquerorp. 243
Carl Diem's Inspiration for the Torch Relay? Jan Wils, Amsterdam 1928, and the Origin of the Olympic Flamep. 253
The Great Progression: A Content Analysis of the Lake Placid News and the Los Angeles Times' Treatment of the 1932 Olympicsp. 261
The Olympics after World War II
Womanizing Olympic Athletes: Policy and Practice during the Avery Brundage Erap. 273
The Bridge to Change: The 1976 Montreal Olympic Games, South African Apartheid Policy, and the Olympic Boycott Paradigmp. 283
Splitting Hairs: The Struggle between the Canadian Federal Government and the Organizing Committee of the 1976 Torontolympiad concerning South African Participationp. 297
Juan Antonio Samaranch's Score Sheet: Revenue Generation and the Olympic Movement, 1980-2001p. 309
The Future of the Olympic Games
Olympic Ideals: Pragmatic Method and the Future of the Gamesp. 325
"To Construct a Better and More Peaceful World" or "War Minus the Shooting"?: The Olympic Movement's Second Centuryp. 335
Works Cited in Part IIp. 351
Glossary of Termsp. 359
Indexp. 363
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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