Catalogue

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The segregated scholars : Black social scientists and the creation of Black labor studies, 1890-1950 /
Francille Rusan Wilson.
imprint
Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2006.
description
xiv, 356 p.
ISBN
0813925509 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Charlottesville : University of Virginia Press, 2006.
isbn
0813925509 (alk. paper)
contents note
"To make a name in science-- and thus to raise my race" : W.E.B. DuBois and the origins of Black labor studies -- Creating a cadre of segregated scholars, 1898-1912 -- Black women, social science, and social reform from the turn of the century to the great migration -- Mapping the great migration : Black social scientists, social research, and social action, 1910-1930 -- "A new day for the colored woman worker"? : recovering the labor studies of Black female social scientists during the great migration -- "A corporal's guard" for Negro workers : Black labor scholars during the New Deal and the Second World War, 1930-1950.
catalogue key
6039448
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-11-01:
Between 1890 and 1950, labor studies became the central focus of the 15 social scientists discussed in this book. These scholars connected their research and writings to the need to improve the status of black workers. Wilson (Univ. of Maryland) derives the term "segregated scholars" from the tension between the scholars' commitment to objectivity and the framework of racial oppression within which they labored. The pages devoted to W.E.B. Du Bois illuminate his break with Booker T. Washington as reflected in Du Bois's pioneering The Negro Artisan (1902), which allowed black workers to speak for themselves. Wilson's book is enriched by her stress on the groundbreaking work of black women scholars, several of whom took part in sessions of the Atlanta University Conference for the Study of Negro Problems. She notes that women students played a key role in Du Bois's research during his Atlanta years. Following incisive discussion of several scholars whose work spanned the Great Migration years, the author proceeds to Abram Harris and Charles Wesley, who employed new methods of methodological sophistication. Wilson asks why after 1950 a new generation of black labor scholars did not emerge. While the answers are by no means final, they should encourage further study. All in all, an outstanding piece of social science scholarship. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. H. Shapiro emeritus, University of Cincinnati
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, November 2007
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Summaries
Long Description
Offers a "collective biography" of successive cohorts of early twentieth century black labor historians and social scientists.
Main Description
In Segregated Scholars Francille Rusan Wilson explores the lives and work of fifteen black labor historians and social scientists as seen through the prisms of gender, class, and time. This collective biography offers complex and vital portraits of these seminal figures, many of whom knew and worked with each other, following them through their educations, their often groundbreaking work in economic and labor studies, and their invaluable public advocacy. The careers Wilson considers include many of the most brilliant of their eras. She sheds new light on the interplay of the professional and political commitments of W. E. B. Du Bois, Abram L. Harris, Robert C. Weaver, Carter G. Woodson, George E. Haynes, Charles H. Wesley, R. R. Wright Jr. -- a succession of scholars bent on replacing myths and stereotypes regarding black labor with rigorous research and analysis. Equally important is the special emphasis Wilson places on little-known female social scientists such as Gertrude McDougald, Emma Shields Penn, and Elizabeth Haynes. The result is more than simply a balanced picture; it is an act of recovery. Many of Wilson's portraits are the most extensive available. Their extraordinary lives are an opportunity to examine the ways in which labor history -- and, more broadly, women's and black intellectual history -- have developed as separate and parallel discourses and disciplines. Segregated Scholars makes a crucial and unprecedented contribution to our understanding of the black intellectual heritage, as well as the history of the social sciences, and of many of the practices and policies with which we now live and work.
Main Description
In Segregated Scholars Francille Rusan Wilson explores the lives and work of fifteen black labor historians and social scientists as seen through the prisms of gender, class, and time. This collective biography offers complex and vital portraits of these seminal figures, many of whom knew and worked with each other, following them through their educations, their often groundbreaking work in economic and labor studies, and their invaluable public advocacy.The careers Wilson considers include many of the most brilliant of their eras. She sheds new light on the interplay of the professional and political commitments of W. E. B. Du Bois, Abram L. Harris, Robert C. Weaver, Carter G. Woodson, George E. Haynes, Charles H. Wesley, R. R. Wright Jr. -- a succession of scholars bent on replacing myths and stereotypes regarding black labor with rigorous research and analysis.Equally important is the special emphasis Wilson places on little-known female social scientists such as Gertrude McDougald, Emma Shields Penn, and Elizabeth Haynes. The result is more than simply a balanced picture; it is an act of recovery. Many of Wilson's portraits are the most extensive available. Their extraordinary lives are an opportunity to examine the ways in which labor history -- and, more broadly, women's and black intellectual history -- have developed as separate and parallel discourses and disciplines.Segregated Scholars makes a crucial and unprecedented contribution to our understanding of the black intellectual heritage, as well as the history of the social sciences, and of many of the practices and policies with which we now live and work.
Table of Contents
"To make a name in science ... and thus to raise my race" : W. E. B. Du Bois and the origins of black labor studiesp. 9
Creating a cadre of segregated scholars, 1898-1912p. 40
Black women, social science, and social reform from the turn of the century to the great migrationp. 90
Mapping the great migration : black social scientists, social research, and social action, 1910-1930p. 115
"A new day for the colored woman worker"? : recovering the labor studies of black female social scientists during the great migrationp. 173
"A corporal's guard" for Negro workers : black labor scholars during the New Deal and the Second World War, 1930-1950p. 215
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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