Catalogue


Caribbean women writers and globalization : fictions of independence /
Helen Scott.
imprint
Aldershot, Hants ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2006.
description
193 p. : maps.
ISBN
0754651347 (alk. paper), 9780754651345 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, Hants ; Burlington, VT : Ashgate, c2006.
isbn
0754651347 (alk. paper)
9780754651345 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
6034818
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-06-01:
Scott (Univ. of Vermont) rightly limits her dense but accessible treatment to Anglo texts instead of overreaching to consider the entire Caribbean (frequent references nevertheless confirm her command of other Caribbean literatures). In discussing works by Edwidge Danticat, Jamaica Kincaid, Pauline Melville, Janice Shinebourne, Oonya Kempadoo, Grace Nichols, Beryl Gilroy, and Merle Collins, Scott resists facile reductive tendencies of generalization and oversimplification. She deftly entwines the historical and geopolitical contexts within which contemporary women writers from Haiti, Antigua, Guyana, and Grenada initiate and/or transform earlier literary traditions. Unlike their male predecessors, whose texts tend to call for national liberation in response to colonialism, these female writers propose no solutions. Instead, they produce works punctuated with social critiques of neoliberal influences resulting in newer incarnations of imperialism that continue to impede autonomous rule: "fictitious" independence, US intervention, global economic forces. In her compelling analysis of texts bemoaning the region's present situation, Scott lightly sketches only one conclusion common among them: having seen repeated failures, all authors communicate, though to varying degrees, a hope for change--if such a change is at all possible outside the confines of imagined literary contexts. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. J. M. Beatson Gordon College
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, June 2007
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Caribbean Women Writers and Globalization offers a fresh reading of contemporary literature by Caribbean women in the context of global and local economic forces, providing a valuable corrective to much Caribbean feminist literary criticism. Departing from the trend towards thematic diasporic studies, Helen Scott considers each text in light of its national historical and cultural origins while also acknowledging regional and international patterns. Though the work of Caribbean women writers is apparently less political than the male-dominated literature of national liberation, Scott argues that these women nonetheless express the sociopolitical realities of the postindependent Caribbean providing insight into the dynamics of imperialism that survive the demise of formal colonialism. In addition, she identifies the specific aesthetic qualities that reach beyond the confines of geography and history in the work of such writers as Oonya Kempadoo, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Pauline Melville, and Janice Shinebourne. Throughout, Scott's persuasive and accessible study sustains the dialectical principle that art is inseparable from social forces and yet always strains against the limits they impose. Her book will be an indispensable resource for literature and women's studies scholars, as well as for those interested in postcolonial, cultural, and globalization studies.
Main Description
Helen Scott approaches contemporary Caribbean women's writing in the context of global and local economic forces. Considering each text within its national historical and cultural origins while acknowledging regional and international patterns, Scott examines the dynamics of imperialism and illuminates the specific aesthetic qualities that reach beyond the confines of geography and history in the work of such writers as Oonya Kempadoo, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Pauline Melville, and Janice Shinebourne.
Long Description
Caribbean Women Writers and Globalization offers a fresh reading of contemporary literature by Caribbean women in the context of global and local economic forces, providing a valuable corrective to much Caribbean feminist literary criticism. Departing from the trend towards thematic diasporic studies, Helen Scott considers each text in light of its national historical and cultural origins while also acknowledging regional and international patterns. Though the work of Caribbean women writers is apparently less political than the male-dominated literature of national liberation, Scott argues that these women nonetheless express the sociopolitical realities of the postindependent Caribbean, providing insight into the dynamics of imperialism that survive the demise of formal colonialism. In addition, she identifies the specific aesthetic qualities that reach beyond the confines of geography and history in the work of such writers as Oonya Kempadoo, Jamaica Kincaid, Edwidge Danticat, Pauline Melville, and Janice Shinebourne. Throughout, Scott's persuasive and accessible study sustains the dialectical principle that art is inseparable from social forces and yet always strains against the limits they impose. Her book will be an indispensable resource for literature and women's studies scholars, as well as for those interested in postcolonial, cultural, and globalization studies.
Bowker Data Service Summary
A fresh reading of contemporary literature by Caribbean women in the context of global and local economic forces, providing a valuable corrective to much Caribbean feminist literary criticism.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Caribbean women writers and postcolonial imperialism
Land of mountains
Gateway to the Caribbean
Land of waters
The spice isle
Afterword: a dream deferred
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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