Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

The forbidden schoolhouse : the true and dramatic story of Prudence Crandall and her students. /
Suzanne Jurmain.
imprint
Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2005.
description
[ix],150 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0618473025 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boston : Houghton Mifflin, 2005.
isbn
0618473025 (hardcover)
abstract
"They threw rocks and rotten eggs at the school windows. Villagers refused to sell Miss Crandall groceries or let her students attend the town church. Mysteriously, her schoolhouse was set on fire‚āáby whom and how remains a mystery. The town authorities dragged her to jail and put her on trial for breaking the law. Her crime? Trying to teach African American girls geography, history, reading, philosophy, and chemistry. Trying to open and maintain one of the first African American schools in America. Exciting and eye-opening, this account of the heroine of Canterbury, Connecticut, and her elegant white schoolhouse at the center of town will give readers a glimpse of what it is like to try to change the world when few agree with you."--Publisher's website (www.houghtonmifflinbooks.com)
catalogue key
6032052
target audience
10 and up.
Grades 5 and up.
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Golden Kite Awards, USA, 2005 : Nominated
James Madison Book Award, USA, 2006 : Nominated
NCTE Orbis Pictus Award, USA, 2006 : Nominated
Rhode Island Children's Book Award, USA, 2007 : Nominated
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A captivating read." --Kirkus Reviews
"Fascinating photographs and images...and endnotes provide insight into the lives of the students, Crandall, and her supporters." --Horn Book
"Fascinating photographs and images from period newspapers accompany many of the pages, and endnotes provide insight into the later lives of the students, Crandall, and her supporters." -Horn Book
"Jermain has plucked an almost forgotten incident from history and has shaped a compelling, highly readable book around it." -Booklist, starred
"Jermain has plucked an almost forgotten incident from history and has shaped a compelling, highly readable book around it." --Booklist, starred Booklist, ALA, Starred Review "Fascinating photographs and images...and endnotes provide insight into the lives of the students, Crandall, and her supporters." --Horn Book Horn Book "This book offers a fresh look at the climate of education for African Americans and women in the early 1800s."----School Library Journal School Library Journal "A captivating read." --Kirkus Reviews Kirkus Reviews
"Jermain has plucked an almost forgotten incident from history and has shaped a compelling, highly readable book around it." --Booklist, starred Booklist, ALA, Starred Review "Fascinating photographs and images...and endnotes provide insight into the lives of the students, Crandall, and her supporters." --Horn Book Horn Book "This book offers a fresh look at the climate of education for African Americans and women in the early 1800s."--School Library Journal School Library Journal "A captivating read." --Kirkus Reviews Kirkus Reviews
"This book offers a fresh look at the climate of education for African Americans and women in the early 1800s."School Library Journal
"This book offers a fresh look at the climate of education for African Americans and women in the early 1800s."--School Library Journal
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Booklist, October 2005
Horn Book Magazine, November 2005
School Library Journal, November 2005
Washington Post, December 2005
Horn Book Guide, January 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
They threw rocks and rotten eggs at the school windows. Villagers refused to sell Miss Crandall groceries or let her students attend the town church. Mysteriously, her schoolhouse was set on fireby whom and how remains a mystery. The town authorities dragged her to jail and put her on trial for breaking the law.Her crime? Trying to teach African American girls geography, history, reading, philosophy, and chemistry. Trying to open and maintain one of the first African American schools in America.Exciting and eye-opening, this account of the heroine of Canterbury, Connecticut, and her elegant white schoolhouse at the center of town will give readers a glimpse of what it is like to try to change the world when few agree with you.
Main Description
They threw rocks and rotten eggs at the school windows. Villagers refused to sell Miss Crandall groceries or let her students attend the town church. Mysteriously, her schoolhouse was set on fire--by whom and how remains a mystery. The town authorities dragged her to jail and put her on trial for breaking the law. Her crime? Trying to teach African American girls geography, history, reading, philosophy, and chemistry. Trying to open and maintain one of the first African American schools in America. Exciting and eye-opening, this account of the heroine of Canterbury, Connecticut, and her elegant white schoolhouse at the center of town will give readers a glimpse of what it is like to try to change the world when few agree with you.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem