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Céli Dé in Ireland : monastic writing and identity in the early Middle Ages /
Westley Follett.
imprint
Woodbridge [England] : Boydell Press, 2006.
description
xii, 253 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1843832763 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Woodbridge [England] : Boydell Press, 2006.
isbn
1843832763 (hbk.)
catalogue key
6022079
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 235-246) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
An investigation into the mysterious group of monks, the Céli Dé, who flourished in early medieval Ireland. This work challenges the orthodox opinion that they were an order or movement intent upon monastic reform at a time of declining religious discipline.
Long Description
The Cli D (clients of God'), sometimes referred to as the Culdees, comprise the group of monks who first appeared in Ireland in the eighth century in association with St Mel Ruain of Tallaght. Although influential and important in the development of the monastic tradition in Ireland, they have been neglected in general histories. This book offers an investigation into the movement. Proceeding from an examination of ascetic practice and theory in early medieval Ireland, followed by a fresh look at the evidence most often cited in support of the prevailing theory of cli D identity, the author challenges the orthodox opinion that they were an order or movement intent upon monastic reform at a time of declining religious discipline. At the heart of the book is a manuscript-centred critical evaluation of the large corpus of putative cli D texts, offered as a means for establishing a more comprehensive assessment of who and what cli D were. Dr Follett argues that they are properly understood as the self-identified members of the personal retinue of God, in whose service they distinguished themselves from other monks and monastic communities in their personal devotion, pastoral care, Sunday observance, and other matters. A catalogue of cli D texts with manuscript references is provided in an appendix.WESTLEY FOLLETT is the LeConte Teaching Fellow in Medieval History at the University of Georgia.
Main Description
A detailed investigation into the mysterious group of monks, the Céli Dé, who flourished in early medieval Ireland.
Main Description
The Céli Dé ('clients of God'), sometimes referred to as the Culdees, comprise the group of monks who first appeared in Ireland in the eighth century in association with St Máel Ruain of Tallaght. Although influential and important in the development of the monastic tradition in Ireland, they have been neglected in general histories. This book offers an investigation into the movement. Proceeding from an examination of ascetic practice and theory in early medieval Ireland, followed by a fresh look at the evidence most often cited in support of the prevailing theory of céli Dé identity, the author challenges the orthodox opinion that they were an order or movement intent upon monastic reform at a time of declining religious discipline. At the heart of the book is a manuscript-centred critical evaluation of the large corpus of putative céli Dé texts, offered as a means for establishing a more comprehensive assessment of who and what céli Dé were. Dr Follett argues that they are properly understood as the self-identified members of the personal retinue of God, in whose service they distinguished themselves from other monks and monastic communities in their personal devotion, pastoral care, Sunday observance, and other matters. A catalogue of céli Dé texts with manuscript references is provided in an appendix. WESTLEY FOLLETT is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Southern Mississippi.
Main Description
The C_li D_ ('clients of God'), sometimes referred to as the Culdees, comprise the group of monks who first appeared in Ireland in the eighth century in association with St Mfel Ruain of Tallaght. Although influential and important in the development of the monastic tradition in Ireland, they have been neglected in general histories. This book offers an investigation into the movement. Proceeding from an examination of ascetic practice and theory in early medieval Ireland, followed by a fresh look at the evidence most often cited in support of the prevailing theory of c_li D_ identity, the author challenges the orthodox opinion that they were an order or movement intent upon monastic reform at a time of declining religious discipline. At the heart of the book is a manuscript-centred critical evaluation of the large corpus of putative c_li D_ texts, offered as a means for establishing a more comprehensive assessment of who and what c_li D_ were. Dr Follett argues that they are properly understood as the self-identified members of the personal retinue of God, in whose service they distinguished themselves from other monks and monastic communities in their personal devotion, pastoral care, Sunday observance, and other matters. A catalogue of c_li D_ texts with manuscript references is provided in an appendix. WESTLEY FOLLETT is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Southern Mississippi.
Unpaid Annotation
A detailed investigation into the mysterious group of monks, the C_li D_, who flourished in early medieval Ireland.
Table of Contents
List of maps and figuresp. vii
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Abbreviationsp. x
Siglap. xi
A note on orthographyp. xii
Introductionp. 1
Celi De historiographyp. 9
Irish asceticism before celi Dep. 24
Celi De as reformers: the evidence of the Tallaght memoirp. 89
A survey of texts attributed to celi Dep. 100
Towards a reassessment of celi Dep. 171
Epiloguep. 216
A catalogue of texts attributed to celi Dep. 220
Bibliographyp. 235
Indexp. 247
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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