Catalogue


Building prosperity : why Ronald Reagan and the founding fathers were right on the economy /
Gene W. Heck.
imprint
Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield, 2007.
description
xxiv, 257 p.
ISBN
0742551903 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780742551909 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
author
imprint
Lanham, Md. : Rowman & Littlefield, 2007.
isbn
0742551903 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780742551909 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6021862
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Gene W. Heck is a senior business development economist operating in Saudi Arabia and throughout the Middle East
Reviews
Review Quotes
A good book for anyone interested in the direction of the U.S. economy.
Gene Heck's Building Prosperity demonstrates a superb understanding of the distorting effects that taxes have on the incentive to produce. Its historical perspective, and its portrayal of "The Real President," reveal the defining difference that Ronald Reagan made in rebuilding America in the 1980s.
Gene Heck's work ably highlights the astuteness of Ronald Reagan in heeding economic history and the remarkable vision of the Founding Fathers in forging America's present generation of prosperity.
Gene W. Heck is one of the most informed and talented analysts in the world.
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2007
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Summaries
Long Description
Throughout history, civilized advance has been propelled by man's pursuit of profit motive and financed by surplus capital won in that pursuit. Success or failure in amassing such capital, in turn, has invariably been a function of the economic and legal frameworks within which that quest has taken place. In Building Prosperity, Heck explains the vital lessons learned from that history and explores what they posit for 21st century economic governance producing a cogent message of relevance to public officials, entrepreneurs, and scholars alike.
Long Description
Throughout history, civilized advance has been propelled by man's pursuit of profit motive and financed by "surplus capital" won in that pursuit. Success or failure in amassing such capital, in turn, has invariably been a function of the economic and legal frameworks within which that quest has taken place. Working from this premise, Building Prosperity focuses upon the crucial role of profit earned through self-motivation ”unfettered by excessive taxation and regulation ”in freeing mankind from mere subsistence to the exploration of science, literature, and the other arts that constitute cultural progress. Using both this history and the guidance of America's founders, Heck makes the case for more prudent public stewardship ”tax and regulatory reform, advanced technological development, and education ”designed to preserve the nation's traditional economic strengths, enhance its modern global trade competitiveness, and ensure that the 21st century will again be an "American Century."
Main Description
Throughout history, civilized advance has been propelled by man's pursuit of profit motive and financed by surplus capital won in that pursuit. Success or failure in amassing such capital, in turn, has invariably been a function of the economic and legal frameworks within which that quest has taken place. In Building Prosperity, Heck explains the vital lessons learned from that history and explores what they posit for 21st century economic governanceproducing a cogent message of relevance to public officials, entrepreneurs, and scholars alike.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction. Building Twenty-first Century Governance for the Twenty-first Century "New Economy"p. xiii
In Quest of "Economic Man"
Reflections on the Opportunity Costs of Failing to "Seize the Moment"p. 3
"Economic Man" and the Quest for Capital Gainp. 21
Overarching Issues
Why Bureaucracy Is Costlyp. 43
Why Regulatory Costs Matterp. 61
Why Tax Levels Matterp. 81
Why Global Trade Competitiveness Mattersp. 99
Why Technology-Based Development Mattersp. 119
Education and the Technology Development Processp. 137
"Responsible Remedies": An American Agenda
What Doesn't Work: The Economic Problem with the Liberal Pabulump. 159
Epilogue. America: A Shining City on a Hillp. 177
The American Competitiveness Agendap. 189
Bibliographyp. 225
Indexp. 243
About the Authorp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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