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Slavery and politics in the early American republic /
Matthew Mason.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2006.
description
xii, 339 p.
ISBN
0807830496 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807830499 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2006.
isbn
0807830496 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807830499 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Slavery and politics to 1808 -- Federalists, Republicans, and slavery during the War of 1812 -- Slavery and partisan conflict during the era of good feelings -- Slavery in Anglo-American relations -- The political impact of African Americans -- Defending against slavery -- Defending slavery -- Commencement exercises : the Missouri crisis -- Antebellum legacies.
catalogue key
6021794
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Giving close consideration to previously neglected debates, Matthew Mason challenges the common contention that slavery held little political significance in America until the Missouri Crisis of 1819. Mason demonstrates that slavery and politics were enmeshed in the creation of the nation, and in fact there was never a time between the Revolution and the Civil War in which slavery went uncontested.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-08-01:
Americans developed a slavery-driven sectional politics in the 1810s, before the Missouri controversy, according to Mason (Brigham Young Univ.). He thus contends with historians who see a quiet period in slavery disputes before 1819 and those who find it the sectional issue as early as the Constitutional Convention. Mason begins with opponents of the War of 1812, who denounced the perceived unfairness of "slave representation" fostered by the "three-fifths clause" of the Constitution. After the war, antislavery concerns centered on the rapid expansion of the slave states and northern fears of dwindling power within the union. Mason also considers the colonization movement and African American opposition thereto. Throughout, he emphasizes rhetorical pro- and antislavery modes of thought that shaped the contours of sectional politics, as well as regional variations. Mid-Atlantic opponents of slavery dwelt more on kidnapping of free blacks while northwesterners inveighed against the expansion of slavery, for example. Mason argues his interpretation of sectional politics narrowly, but he backs his claims with solid scholarship and a careful use of his sources. Scholars and general readers alike will profit from this book. Summing Up: Recommended. Most levels/libraries. T. S. Whitman Mount St. Mary's University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[A] careful and complex depiction of the variety of ways in which slavery entered the politics of the period. . . . A major contribution to our understanding of the significant role the institution of slavery had in the politics of the early republic." _ Journal of the Early Republic
"[A] careful and complex depiction of the variety of ways in which slavery entered the politics of the period. . . . A major contribution to our understanding of the significant role the institution of slavery had in the politics of the early republic." -- Journal of the Early Republic
"[A] careful and complex depiction of the variety of ways in which slavery entered the politics of the period. . . . A major contribution to our understanding of the significant role the institution of slavery had in the politics of the early republic." --Journal of the Early Republic
"After reading this interesting book, few historians can deny that slavery was an important, indeed integral, component of the politics of the early American republic." _ Civil War History
"After reading this interesting book, few historians can deny that slavery was an important, indeed integral, component of the politics of the early American republic." -- Civil War History
"After reading this interesting book, few historians can deny that slavery was an important, indeed integral, component of the politics of the early American republic." --Civil War History
"Elegantly written . . . benefit[s] from copious research." _ New England Quarterly
"Elegantly written . . . benefit[s] from copious research." -- New England Quarterly
"Elegantly written . . . benefit[s] from copious research." --New England Quarterly
"Extensive and persuasive. . . . Adds rich and valuable texture to our understanding of early national politics and the Missouri Crisis." _ William and Mary Quarterly
"Extensive and persuasive. . . . Adds rich and valuable texture to our understanding of early national politics and the Missouri Crisis." -- William and Mary Quarterly
"Extensive and persuasive. . . . Adds rich and valuable texture to our understanding of early national politics and the Missouri Crisis." --William and Mary Quarterly
"Mason has done an excellent job of assembling and presenting a wealth of evidence in a clear, coherent fashion." _ Indiana Magazine of History
"Mason has done an excellent job of assembling and presenting a wealth of evidence in a clear, coherent fashion." -- Indiana Magazine of History
"Mason has done an excellent job of assembling and presenting a wealth of evidence in a clear, coherent fashion." --Indiana Magazine of History
"Mason's historical argument is a powerful one. . . . In a revisionist vein, it shows how the 1808-1820 years were not really the lull before the antebellum storm." _ American Historical Review
"Mason's historical argument is a powerful one. . . . In a revisionist vein, it shows how the 1808-1820 years were not really the lull before the antebellum storm." - American Historical Review
"Mason's historical argument is a powerful one. . . . In a revisionist vein, it shows how the 1808-1820 years were not really the lull before the antebellum storm." -American Historical Review
"Mason unapologetically restores politics to the center stage. . . . [He] has a mastery of the secondary literature. . . . This is a bird's-eye view that leaves plenty of scope for future researchers." _ Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"Mason unapologetically restores politics to the center stage. . . . [He] has a mastery of the secondary literature. . . . This is a bird's-eye view that leaves plenty of scope for future researchers." -- Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"Mason unapologetically restores politics to the center stage. . . . [He] has a mastery of the secondary literature. . . . This is a bird's-eye view that leaves plenty of scope for future researchers." --Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"Scholars and general readers alike will profit from this book. . . . Recommended." _ CHOICE
"Scholars and general readers alike will profit from this book. . . . Recommended." -- CHOICE
"Scholars and general readers alike will profit from this book. . . . Recommended." --CHOICE
" Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic is based on extensive research, broad in scope, clearly organized, and well written. Mason has made a significant contribution to the history of the Early Republic and of American slavery." -- Georgia Historical Quarterly
"Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republicis based on extensive research, broad in scope, clearly organized, and well written. Mason has made a significant contribution to the history of the Early Republic and of American slavery." --Georgia Historical Quarterly
"This well-crafted monograph . . . revises our understanding of the early national debates over slavery. . . . Scholars of slavery and early national politics will want to read Mason's work." _ Journal of Southern History
"This well-crafted monograph . . . revises our understanding of the early national debates over slavery. . . . Scholars of slavery and early national politics will want to read Mason's work." -- Journal of Southern History
"This well-crafted monograph . . . revises our understanding of the early national debates over slavery. . . . Scholars of slavery and early national politics will want to read Mason's work." --Journal of Southern History
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
Giving close consideration to previously neglected debates, Matthew Mason challenges the common contention that slavery held little political significance in America until the Missouri Crisis of 1819. Mason demonstrates that slavery and politics were enmeshed in the creation of the nation, and in fact there was never a time between the Revolution and the Civil War in which slavery went uncontested.The American Revolution set in motion the split between slave states and free states, but Mason explains that the divide took on greater importance in the early nineteenth century. He examines the partisan and geopolitical uses of slavery, the conflicts between free states and their slaveholding neighbors, and the political impact of African Americans across the country.Offering a full picture of the politics of slavery in the crucial years of the early republic, Mason demonstrates that partisans and patriots, slave and free--and not just abolitionists and advocates of slavery--should be considered important players in the politics of slavery in the United States.
Main Description
Giving close consideration to previously neglected debates, Matthew Mason challenges the common contention that slavery held little political significance in America until the Missouri Crisis of 1819. Mason demonstrates that slavery and politics were enmeshed in the creation of the nation, and in fact there was never a time between the Revolution and the Civil War in which slavery went uncontested. The American Revolution set in motion the split between slave states and free states, but Mason explains that the divide took on greater importance in the early nineteenth century. He examines the partisan and geopolitical uses of slavery, the conflicts between free states and their slaveholding neighbors, and the political impact of African Americans across the country. Offering a full picture of the politics of slavery in the crucial years of the early republic, Mason demonstrates that partisans and patriots, slave and free--and not just abolitionists and advocates of slavery--should be considered important players in the politics of slavery in the United States.
Table of Contents
Slavery and politics to 1808p. 9
Federalists, Republicans, and slavery during the War of 1812p. 42
Slavery and partisan conflict during the era of good feelingsp. 75
Slavery in Anglo-American relationsp. 87
The political impact of African Americansp. 106
Defending against slaveryp. 130
Defending slaveryp. 158
Commencement exercises : the Missouri crisisp. 177
Antebellum legaciesp. 213
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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