Catalogue


The Inventory of King Henry VIII : Society of Antiquaries MS 129 and British Library MS Harley 1419.
imprint
London : Harvey Miller for the Society of Antiquaries of London, c1998-
description
v. : ill. ; 29 cm.
ISBN
1872501893
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
London : Harvey Miller for the Society of Antiquaries of London, c1998-
isbn
1872501893
contents note
[1.] The transcript / edited by David Starkey ; transcribed by Philip Ward and indexed by Alasdair Hawkyard.
catalogue key
6006919
A Look Inside
Summaries
Long Description
The Inventory is not only a catalogue of magnificence but also a key text for evaluating the successes and failures of the Tudor monarchy. Henry VIII had extravagant ideas of image and authority and loved his possessions, amongst which where over 2,000 pieces of tapestry, 2,028 items of gold and silver plate and 41 growns. Although he left the country with heavy debts and an empty exchequer, he was far from bankrupting the monarchy as some scholars have suggested. Indeed the Inventory allows us to calculate that at the time of his death the contents of his palaces and wardrobes were worth about 300,000 and the military and naval stores a further 300,000. Most of what the King owned has unfortunately since disappeared. Yet the Inventory tells us what once existed, enables us to identify surviving objects and also helps once belonged to hem. The transcription of the inventory is accompanied by a historical introduction, a glossary of technical terms, and an exhaustive Index which is a major tool of scholarship in its own right. The Inventory is not only a catalogue of magnificence but also a key text for evaluating the successes and failures of the Tudor monarchy under Henry VIII, telling us what once existed, and enabling us to identify surviving objects.
Long Description
The Inventory is not only a catalogue of magnificence but also a key text for evaluating the successes and failures of the Tudor monarchy. Henry VIII had extravagant ideas of image and authority and loved his possessions, amongst which where over 2,000 pieces of tapestry, 2,028 items of gold and silver plate and 41 growns. Although he left the country with heavy debts and an empty exchequer, he was far from bankrupting the monarchy as some scholars have suggested. Indeed the Inventory allows us to calculate that at the time of his death the contents of his palaces and wardrobes were worth about oe300,000 and the military and naval stores a further oe300,000. Most of what the King owned has unfortunately since disappeared. Yet the Inventory tells us what once existed, enables us to identify surviving objects and also helps once belonged to hem. The transcription of the inventory is accompanied by a historical introduction, a glossary of technical terms, and an exhaustive Index which is a major tool of scholarship in its own right. The Inventory is not only a catalogue of magnificence but also a key text for evaluating the successes and failures of the Tudor monarchy under Henry VIII, telling us what once existed, and enabling us to identify surviving objects.
Long Description
This vast catalogue of the possessions of the Henry VIII on his death in 1547 contains c.18,000 entries; these range from the Crown jewels to bandages for the kings ulcerated leg! The Inventory provides a huge amount of information for historians on the material success of Henry and his forebears, as well as being of practical help in identifying surviving objects as the king's or otherwise. The transcript is accompanied by a historical introduction, notes on the transcription and an exhaustive index. It will be followed in the future by Volumes II and III, which will contains essays on the contents of the inventory.

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