Catalogue


Walking it off : a veteran's chronicle of war and wilderness /
Doug Peacock.
imprint
Cheney, Wash. : Eastern Washington University Press, c2005.
description
ix, 196 p. ; 22 cm.
ISBN
0910055998 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cheney, Wash. : Eastern Washington University Press, c2005.
isbn
0910055998 (pbk. : alk. paper)
catalogue key
6000744
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Peacock's life makes nearly all of the environmental movement look like an upper-class bridge tournament."
"Doug Peacock is a direct literary descendant of Thoreau, with a few genes from Audubon and his mentor, Edward Abbey. . . . His meditations on war and wilderness are painfully apt today."
"An intense, personal, and very painful tribute to a thorny friendship and its shared vision of the stunted modern values that waste and desecrate our country's land and life."
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Summaries
Main Description
Peacock's eagerly awaited tale brings us epic personalities, traumatizing war, grizzly bears, and wildass adventure. A former Green Beret medic in Vietnam, he was mythologized by Edward Abbey as George Washington Hayduke in his environmental classic The Monkey Wrench Gang. Peacock has since become celebrated for his wildlife writing, his book Grizzly Years, and his tireless struggle to help preserve what is wild both in and around us. Book jacket.
Unpaid Annotation
When he wrote The Monkey Wrench Gang in 1975, Edward Abbey became the spokesperson for a generation of Americans angered by the unthinking destruction of our natural heritage. Without consultation, Abbey based the central character of eco-guerilla George Washington Hayduke on his friend Doug Peacock. Since then Peacock has become an articulate environmental individualist writing about the West's abundant wildscapes. Abbey and Peacock had an at times stormy, almost father and son relationship that was peacefully resolved in Abbey's last days before his death in 1989. This rich recollection of their relationship and the dry places they explored are recalled in Peacock's honest and heartfelt style in this poignant memoir.
Main Description
When he wrote The Monkey Wrench Gang in 1975, Edward Abbey became the spokesperson for a generation of Americans angered by the unthinking destruction of our natural heritage. Without consultation, Abbey based the central character of eco-guerilla George Washington Hayduke on his friend Doug Peacock. Since then Peacock has become an articulate environmental individualist writing about the West's abundant wildscapes.Abbey and Peacock had an at times stormy, almost father and son relationship that was peacefully resolved in Abbey's last days before his death in 1989. This rich recollection of their relationship and the dry places they explored are recalled in Peacock's honest and heartfelt style in this poignant memoir.
Table of Contents
Dedicationp. v
Acknowledgementsp. ix
Nepal: Dhaulagirip. 1
Isla Tiburonp. 5
Originsp. 21
Last Daysp. 39
Burying Haydukep. 48
Coming Downp. 50
Nepal: Walking Upp. 57
Abbey's Countryp. 62
Barrier Canyonp. 87
Nepal: Hidden Valleyp. 91
Black Beachp. 95
Peter Piperp. 103
Nepal: The Passp. 115
After the Warp. 119
Nepal: Walking Outp. 142
Bury My Genome at the Grizzly Hiltonp. 148
The Bombing Rangep. 166
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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