Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

How Bush rules : chronicles of a radical regime /
Sidney Blumenthal.
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2006.
description
xii, 420 p.
ISBN
069112888X (hardcover : alk. paper), 9780691128887 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, c2006.
isbn
069112888X (hardcover : alk. paper)
9780691128887 (hardcover : alk. paper)
general note
Includes index.
catalogue key
5956868
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"To paraphrase Lyndon Johnson, Sidney Blumenthal has been on the inside shooting out and now he's on the outside shooting in. He's hitting his target--the Bush administration--better than anyone else. He sets his sights on the entire Bush agenda--the blundering war in Iraq, a reckless economic policy, a corrupt Congress, and the little-noticed but highly destructive war on honest and objective national security career professionals in the CIA, the State Department, and the military. The result is a devastating account of a radical presidency."--James Carville"History's judgment of America's 43rd president is likely to be harsh. He presented himself in 2000 as a political centrist who would insist on the highest standards of honesty and accountability and would show his country's 'humble but strong' face to the world. He has governed in a very different and destructive way. The full story of how the Bush who was elected became the Bush who governed will take years to tell. But the real-time draft of history provided by Sidney Blumenthal in these dispatches will be an invaluable resource. He is a partisan, and proud of it. But he is also accurate, convincing, urbane, and far ahead of others in detecting trends and connections."--James Fallows, national correspondent for the "Atlantic Monthly" and author of "Blind Into Baghdad""Sidney Blumenthal's sustained evisceration of the Bush II presidency is simply thrilling. At once fiery and cool, powered by the author's extraordinary feel for American politics, American history, American popular culture, and the esoteric mysteries of American conservatism, "How Bush Rules" yields so much fierce pleasure that it does the seeminglyimpossible: it makes from the materials of these lost years a thing of value."--Hendrik Hertzberg, author of "Politics: Observations and Arguments""Sidney Blumenthal is sharper and better informed than most political scientists. He is not only erudite but also witty, accessible, and very quick (but not at all glib), and he writes like a dream."--Alan Ryan, author of "Liberal Anxieties and Liberal Education""This is compelling, tough-minded journalism. It makes an important contribution to public debate."--Ira Katznelson, Columbia University
Flap Copy
"To paraphrase Lyndon Johnson, Sidney Blumenthal has been on the inside shooting out and now he's on the outside shooting in. He's hitting his target--the Bush administration--better than anyone else. He sets his sights on the entire Bush agenda--the blundering war in Iraq, a reckless economic policy, a corrupt Congress, and the little-noticed but highly destructive war on honest and objective national security career professionals in the CIA, the State Department, and the military. The result is a devastating account of a radical presidency."-- James Carville "History's judgment of America's 43rd president is likely to be harsh. He presented himself in 2000 as a political centrist who would insist on the highest standards of honesty and accountability and would show his country's 'humble but strong' face to the world. He has governed in a very different and destructive way. The full story of how the Bush who was elected became the Bush who governed will take years to tell. But the real-time draft of history provided by Sidney Blumenthal in these dispatches will be an invaluable resource. He is a partisan, and proud of it. But he is also accurate, convincing, urbane, and far ahead of others in detecting trends and connections."-- James Fallows, national correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly and author of Blind Into Baghdad "Sidney Blumenthal's sustained evisceration of the Bush II presidency is simply thrilling. At once fiery and cool, powered by the author's extraordinary feel for American politics, American history, American popular culture, and the esoteric mysteries of American conservatism, How Bush Rules yields so much fierce pleasure that it does the seemingly impossible: it makes from the materials of these lost years a thing of value."-- Hendrik Hertzberg, author of Politics: Observations and Arguments "Sidney Blumenthal is sharper and better informed than most political scientists. He is not only erudite but also witty, accessible, and very quick (but not at all glib), and he writes like a dream."-- Alan Ryan, author of Liberal Anxieties and Liberal Education "This is compelling, tough-minded journalism. It makes an important contribution to public debate."-- Ira Katznelson, Columbia University
Flap Copy
"To paraphrase Lyndon Johnson, Sidney Blumenthal has been on the inside shooting out and now he's on the outside shooting in. He's hitting his target--the Bush administration--better than anyone else. He sets his sights on the entire Bush agenda--the blundering war in Iraq, a reckless economic policy, a corrupt Congress, and the little-noticed but highly destructive war on honest and objective national security career professionals in the CIA, the State Department, and the military. The result is a devastating account of a radical presidency."--James Carville "History's judgment of America's 43rd president is likely to be harsh. He presented himself in 2000 as a political centrist who would insist on the highest standards of honesty and accountability and would show his country's 'humble but strong' face to the world. He has governed in a very different and destructive way. The full story of how the Bush who was elected became the Bush who governed will take years to tell. But the real-time draft of history provided by Sidney Blumenthal in these dispatches will be an invaluable resource. He is a partisan, and proud of it. But he is also accurate, convincing, urbane, and far ahead of others in detecting trends and connections."--James Fallows, national correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly and author of Blind Into Baghdad "Sidney Blumenthal's sustained evisceration of the Bush II presidency is simply thrilling. At once fiery and cool, powered by the author's extraordinary feel for American politics, American history, American popular culture, and the esoteric mysteries of American conservatism, How Bush Rules yields so much fierce pleasure that it does the seemingly impossible: it makes from the materials of these lost years a thing of value."--Hendrik Hertzberg, author of Politics: Observations and Arguments "Sidney Blumenthal is sharper and better informed than most political scientists. He is not only erudite but also witty, accessible, and very quick (but not at all glib), and he writes like a dream."--Alan Ryan, author of Liberal Anxieties and Liberal Education "This is compelling, tough-minded journalism. It makes an important contribution to public debate."--Ira Katznelson, Columbia University
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Library Journal on 2006-10-01:
If the bylines of these two journalists were somehow switched, you couldn't spot the mistake from the political views expressed. Their criticisms of the Bush administration are all but interchangeable. Readers familiar with Lapham will recognize both his pen and his politics in the 29 essays reprinted in Pretensions from his "Notebook" columns in Harper's. Following the Theater of War and Gag Rule collections, this set begins in September 2004 with the renomination of President George W. Bush and concludes with "The Case for Impeachment," published to considerable attention in March 2006. The essays, as Lapham himself puts it, "describe a march of folly, establish a record of moral incompetence and criminal intent, speak to the character of a government stupefied by its worship of money and blinded by its belief in miracles." Blumenthal (columnist, the Guardian and Salon; The Clinton Wars), former senior advisor in the Clinton administration, reprints 105 of his columns from November 2003 to April 2006. An original 23-page introduction provides framework: "Bush's presidency has been uniquely radical in its elevation of absolute executive power, dismissal of the other branches of government, contempt for the law, and overtly political use of war." Although such short quotes cannot reveal it, the real distinction between these collections is that Lapham is a stylist and Blumenthal is not. Both books are optional purchases for public and academic libraries. Bob Nardini, Chichester, NH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2006-07-10:
Before joining the Clinton White House as a senior adviser, Blumenthal was a political correspondent for magazines like Vanity Fair and the New Yorker; with this collection of articles published in Salon and the British Guardian, he returns to his journalist roots. Because the majority of the columns are only two or three pages long, it's difficult for Blumenthal to create a sustained argument. The effect is more like a string of scattershot reactions to current events out of which recurring themes occasionally emerge. But even these themes-the incompetence of Bush's closest advisers, the president's voracious assumption of executive powers, the creation of American gulags-fall short of cohering into a pointed attack, despite Blumenthal's best efforts to assert "a crisis over democracy." Instead, his thoughts wander to matters like U.S./U.K. relations or the decline of the columnist Robert Novak, while explosive topics like Vice-President Cheney's unprecedented powers get lost in the shuffle. Thus, Blumenthal's most heated rhetoric, like his claim of "a revolt within the military against Bush," winds up feeling overblown. The effect is especially frustrating given his keen observations of microscopic political detail-it's too bad this collection doesn't add up to the sum of its parts. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 2007-04-01:
A fascinating study of the presidency, of presidential decision making, and of the Bush (II) presidency, journalist Sidney Blumenthal's interesting volume theorizes that George Bush is not really a true conservative. Rather, the author argues, Bush is a radical, deliberately seeking to gain more complete authority over almost every corner of the national government touched or affected by the presidency. The author's arguments are preceded by a careful recitation of the historical precedents of past occupiers of the Oval Office. He not only argues that Bush is intent on fundamentally altering the presidency, but that Bush wants to make the presidential office so powerful that other elements of the government can basically be ignored. The nonconsultative decision-making processes of the Bush White House are examined at great length. The president's early 2007 decision to increase the U.S. troop commitment in Iraq would seem, at first glance, to fit the model constructed by the author. The beauty of this book is that it will stimulate countless hours of discussions, debates, and heated arguments. Reading this book will raise some people's blood pressure. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All readership levels. W. K. Hall Bradley University
Reviews
Review Quotes
A fascinating study of the presidency, of presidential decision making, and of the Bush (II) presidency, journalist Sidney Blumenthal's interesting volume theorizes that George Bush is not really a true conservative. . . . The beauty of this book is that it will stimulate countless hours of discussions, debates, and heated arguments. . . . Highly recommended.
"A fascinating study of the presidency, of presidential decision making, and of the Bush (II) presidency, journalist Sidney Blumenthal's interesting volume theorizes that George Bush is not really a true conservative. . . . The beauty of this book is that it will stimulate countless hours of discussions, debates, and heated arguments. . . . Highly recommended."-- Choice
A fascinating study of the presidency, of presidential decision making, and of the Bush (II) presidency, journalist Sidney Blumenthal's interesting volume theorizes that George Bush is not really a true conservative. . . . The beauty of this book is that it will stimulate countless hours of discussions, debates, and heated arguments. . . . Highly recommended. -- Choice
As an advisor to President Clinton, the man has an insider's perspective on how the White House works--or in Bush's case, fails--a claim few authors can make.
"As an advisor to President Clinton, the man has an insider's perspective on how the White House works--or in Bush's case, fails--a claim few authors can make."-- Billy Kekevian, Philadelphia City Paper
As an advisor to President Clinton, the man has an insider's perspective on how the White House works--or in Bush's case, fails--a claim few authors can make. -- Billy Kekevian, Philadelphia City Paper
"How Bush Rules" is exemplary, convincingly arguing that George W. Bush is 'the most willfully radical president of the United States, ' by documenting in real-time the episodes that have made up his presidency. . . . Blumenthal's columns stand the test of time. Even the oldest pieces aren't dated. . . . Blumenthal is . . . original and illuminating. . . . "How Bush Rules" is a book comprised of timely interventions that is destined to stand the test of time.
How Bush Rules is exemplary, convincingly arguing that George W. Bush is 'the most willfully radical president of the United States,' by documenting in real-time the episodes that have made up his presidency. . . . Blumenthal's columns stand the test of time. Even the oldest pieces aren't dated. . . . Blumenthal is . . . original and illuminating. . . . How Bush Rules is a book comprised of timely interventions that is destined to stand the test of time.
" How Bush Rules is exemplary, convincingly arguing that George W. Bush is 'the most willfully radical president of the United States,' by documenting in real-time the episodes that have made up his presidency. . . . Blumenthal's columns stand the test of time. Even the oldest pieces arent dated. . . . Blumenthal is . . . original and illuminating. . . . How Bush Rules is a book comprised of timely interventions that is destined to stand the test of time."-- Rick Perlstein, In These Times
How Bush Rules is exemplary, convincingly arguing that George W. Bush is 'the most willfully radical president of the United States,' by documenting in real-time the episodes that have made up his presidency. . . . Blumenthal's columns stand the test of time. Even the oldest pieces aren't dated. . . . Blumenthal is . . . original and illuminating. . . . How Bush Rules is a book comprised of timely interventions that is destined to stand the test of time. -- Rick Perlstein, In These Times
How Bush Rulesis exemplary, convincingly arguing that George W. Bush is 'the most willfully radical president of the United States,' by documenting in real-time the episodes that have made up his presidency. . . . Blumenthal's columns stand the test of time. Even the oldest pieces aren't dated. . . . Blumenthal is . . . original and illuminating. . . .How Bush Rulesis a book comprised of timely interventions that is destined to stand the test of time. -- Rick Perlstein, In These Times
Sid Blumenthal [is] the rare analyst of contemporary affairs who brings to his commentary a deep knowledge of American history and political culture. . . . He was one of the people warning us all along about this administration's radicalism. But not enough of us listened or understood.
Sid Blumenthal Ýis¨ the rare analyst of contemporary affairs who brings to his commentary a deep knowledge of American history and political culture. . . . He was one of the people warning us all along about this administration's radicalism. But not enough of us listened or understood. -- David Greenberg "TPMCafe"
"Sid Blumenthal [is] the rare analyst of contemporary affairs who brings to his commentary a deep knowledge of American history and political culture. . . . He was one of the people warning us all along about this administration's radicalism. But not enough of us listened or understood."-- David Greenberg, TPMCafe
Sid Blumenthal [is] the rare analyst of contemporary affairs who brings to his commentary a deep knowledge of American history and political culture. . . . He was one of the people warning us all along about this administration's radicalism. But not enough of us listened or understood. -- David Greenberg, TPMCafe
Sidney Blumenthal . . . understands the workings of the White House. His recently published book, "How Bush Rules: Chronicles of a Radical Regime," collects his columns from November 2003 to April 2006, and they provide week-by-week freeze-frames of an array of significant events over the past three years. (They are, in fact, wonderfully insightful probes by a seasoned journalist with insider experience who knows exactly where to look.)
Sidney Blumenthal . . . understands the workings of the White House. His recently published book, How Bush Rules: Chronicles of a Radical Regime , collects his columns from November 2003 to April 2006, and they provide week-by-week freeze-frames of an array of significant events over the past three years. (They are, in fact, wonderfully insightful probes by a seasoned journalist with insider experience who knows exactly where to look.)
"Sidney Blumenthal . . . understands the workings of the White House. His recently published book, How Bush Rules: Chronicles of a Radical Regime , collects his columns from November 2003 to April 2006, and they provide week-by-week freeze-frames of an array of significant events over the past three years. (They are, in fact, wonderfully insightful probes by a seasoned journalist with insider experience who knows exactly where to look.)"-- John Dean, findlaw.com
Sidney Blumenthal . . . understands the workings of the White House. His recently published book, How Bush Rules: Chronicles of a Radical Regime , collects his columns from November 2003 to April 2006, and they provide week-by-week freeze-frames of an array of significant events over the past three years. (They are, in fact, wonderfully insightful probes by a seasoned journalist with insider experience who knows exactly where to look.) -- John Dean, findlaw.com
Sidney Blumenthal . . . understands the workings of the White House. His recently published book,How Bush Rules: Chronicles of a Radical Regime, collects his columns from November 2003 to April 2006, and they provide week-by-week freeze-frames of an array of significant events over the past three years. (They are, in fact, wonderfully insightful probes by a seasoned journalist with insider experience who knows exactly where to look.) -- John Dean, findlaw.com
While lucid and elegant . . . Sidney Blumenthal is . . . savage in his verdict on George W. Bush in this collection of columns and essays from the Guardian and Salon.
"While lucid and elegant . . . Sidney Blumenthal is . . . savage in his verdict on George W. Bush in this collection of columns and essays from the Guardian and Salon."-- Richard Briand, International Affairs
While lucid and elegant . . . Sidney Blumenthal is . . . savage in his verdict on George W. Bush in this collection of columns and essays from the Guardian and Salon. -- Richard Briand, International Affairs
History's judgment of America's 43rd president is likely to be harsh. He presented himself in 2000 as a political centrist who would insist on the highest standards of honesty and accountability and would show his country's 'humble but strong' face to the world. He has governed in a very different and destructive way. The full story of how the Bush who was elected became the Bush who governed will take years to tell. But the real-time draft of history provided by Sidney Blumenthal in these dispatches will be an invaluable resource. He is a partisan, and proud of it. But he is also accurate, convincing, urbane, and far ahead of others in detecting trends and connections.
Sidney Blumenthal is sharper and better informed than most political scientists. He is not only erudite but also witty, accessible, and very quick (but not at all glib), and he writes like a dream.
Sidney Blumenthal's sustained evisceration of the Bush II presidency is simply thrilling. At once fiery and cool, powered by the author's extraordinary feel for American politics, American history, American popular culture, and the esoteric mysteries of American conservatism,How Bush Rulesyields so much fierce pleasure that it does the seemingly impossible: it makes from the materials of these lost years a thing of value.
This is compelling, tough-minded journalism. It makes an important contribution to public debate.
To paraphrase Lyndon Johnson, Sidney Blumenthal has been on the inside shooting out and now he's on the outside shooting in. He's hitting his target--the Bush administration--better than anyone else. He sets his sights on the entire Bush agenda--the blundering war in Iraq, a reckless economic policy, a corrupt Congress, and the little-noticed but highly destructive war on honest and objective national security career professionals in the CIA, the State Department, and the military. The result is a devastating account of a radical presidency.
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, July 2006
New York Times Book Review, September 2006
Globe & Mail, October 2006
Library Journal, October 2006
San Francisco Chronicle, October 2006
Choice, April 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'How Bush Rules' gives an account of the progression of Bush's radical style - from his reliance on one-party rule, his unwillingness to allow internal debate to his elevation of the power of the vice president. It includes pivotal events such as the hunt for Iraqi weapons of mass destruction, the Jack Abramoff scandal, and more.
Main Description
In a series of columns and essays that renowned journalist and former presidential adviser Sidney Blumenthal wrote in the three years following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, a unifying theme began to emerge: that Bush, billed by himself and by many others as a conservative, is in fact a radical-more radical than any president in American history. InHow Bush Rules, Blumenthal provides a trenchant and vivid account of the progression of Bush's radical style--from his reliance on one-party rule and his unwillingness to allow internal debate to his elevation of the power of the vice president. Taking readers through pivotal events such as the hunt for Iraqi weapons of mass destruction, the rise of the foreign-policy neoconservatives, Abu Ghraib, the war on science, the Jack Abramoff scandal, and the catastrophic mishandling of Hurricane Katrina, the book tracks a consistent policy that calls for the president to have complete authority over independent federal agencies and to remain unbound by congressional oversight or even the law. In an incisive and powerful introduction, Blumenthal argues that these radical actions are not haphazard, but deliberately intended to fundamentally change the presidency and the government. He shows not only the historical precedents for radical governing, but also how Bush has taken his methods to unique extremes. With its penetrating account of a critical new era in American leadership,How Bush Rulesis a devastating appraisal of the Bush presidency.
Main Description
In a series of columns and essays that renowned journalist and former presidential adviser Sidney Blumenthal wrote in the three years following the 2003 invasion of Iraq, a unifying theme began to emerge: that Bush, billed by himself and by many others as a conservative, is in fact a radical--more radical than any president in American history. In How Bush Rules , Blumenthal provides a trenchant and vivid account of the progression of Bush's radical style--from his reliance on one-party rule and his unwillingness to allow internal debate to his elevation of the power of the vice president. Taking readers through pivotal events such as the hunt for Iraqi weapons of mass destruction, the rise of the foreign-policy neoconservatives, Abu Ghraib, the war on science, the Jack Abramoff scandal, and the catastrophic mishandling of Hurricane Katrina, the book tracks a consistent policy that calls for the president to have complete authority over independent federal agencies and to remain unbound by congressional oversight or even the law. In an incisive and powerful introduction, Blumenthal argues that these radical actions are not haphazard, but deliberately intended to fundamentally change the presidency and the government. He shows not only the historical precedents for radical governing, but also how Bush has taken his methods to unique extremes. With its penetrating account of a critical new era in American leadership, How Bush Rules is a devastating appraisal of the Bush presidency.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introduction: The Radical Presidentp. 1
Hubris: "Mission Accomplished": From the Victory in Iraq to the Defeat of John Kerry
The Intelligence Warsp. 27
Bush and Blair: Lessons in Leadershipp. 31
How George Transformed Tony's Worldp. 34
The Good Soldierp. 36
An Unlikely Dissidentp. 39
The Hunt for WMDp. 41
The Madrid Express: 3/11 Meets 9/11p. 44
The Counterterrorism Czar Comes In from the Coldp. 46
The White House Has the Last Laughp. 48
The Road Map to Nowherep. 50
The President Goes Blankp. 52
The Silence of Colin Powellp. 54
Pulp Fictionsp. 57
The Secrets of Abu Ghraibp. 60
The American Military Coup of 2012p. 63
The Holy Warriorp. 66
Riding the Trojan Horsep. 68
The Specter of Vietnamp. 71
The Reagan Legacyp. 74
Reagan's Funeral and Clinton's Portraitp. 76
Cheney's Mask Slipsp. 79
The Senate's Da Vinci Codep. 82
Code Orangep. 85
The Oath of True Believersp. 87
The Rule of Chaosp. 89
Shock and Awe: The Republican National Convention, Day Onep. 92
Fear and Narcissism: The Republican National Convention, Day Twop. 95
None Dare Call It Treason: The Republican National Convention, Day Threep. 98
"A Certain Swagger": The Republican National Convention, Day Fourp. 100
Staring at Defeatp. 103
Falls the Shadowp. 106
"The Right God"p. 108
"The Lowest Grade of Ignorance"p. 110
Colin Powell's Final Daysp. 112
Dedication Dayp. 115
Nemesis I:"Catastrophic Success": From the Death of Terry Schiavo to the Vigil of Cindy Sheehan
Mission Misconceivedp. 119
All Hail Caligula's Horse!p. 122
Medals of Failurep. 124
Purging Poppyp. 127
Metricsp. 129
Regime Changep. 132
"A Broken Force"p. 134
The March of Follyp. 137
Spending Political Capitalp. 140
A Hireling, a Fraud, and a Prostitutep. 143
The Plot against the New Dealp. 145
Orwell's Clockp. 150
The Brilliant Career of Jack Abramoffp. 153
A Confederacy of Shamansp. 159
The Passion of the Culture Warp. 162
Politics under Red Robesp. 166
The Keys of the Kingdomp. 169
"Serial Abuser"p. 175
The Good Soldier's Revengep. 181
The Incredible Shrinking Presidentp. 184
Damagep. 189
Guantanamop. 192
The Truth about Torturep. 199
Deep Throat's Lessonsp. 204
A Broken Bodyp. 207
Blinded by the Light at the End of the Tunnelp. 211
"The Last Throes"p. 214
The Supreme Chance of a Lifetimep. 220
Rove's Warp. 223
Tunnel Visionp. 231
"The Meaning of Words"p. 234
Above the Rule of Lawp. 238
The Informerp. 241
Unhappy Holidayp. 249
Question Timep. 251
Nemesis II: "Heck of a Job": From the Landfall of Hurricane Katrina to the Revolt of the Generals
Hurricane Katrinap. 259
"What Didn't Go Right?"p. 262
"Heck of a Job"p. 268
From Gulf to Shining Gulfp. 270
Karen Hughes Takes a Tourp. 275
Twenty-First-Century Republicanismp. 278
Judy d'Arcp. 286
The Conservative Revoltp. 289
The Indictment of Scooter Libbyp. 292
Cheney's Trialp. 295
Stab in the Backp. 298
The Long March of Dick Cheneyp. 300
Bob Woodward's Cover-upp. 307
Condi's Tortuous Trailp. 310
"The Law is King"p. 316
Annus Horribilisp. 322
Bush's War on Professionalsp. 325
Meek, Mild, and Menacingp. 331
The Republican Systemp. 334
The Proconsul's Apologiap. 343
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem