Catalogue

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Beyond Papillon : the French overseas penal colonies, 1854-1952 /
Stephen A. Toth.
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2006.
description
xvii, 212 p.
ISBN
0803244495 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780803244498 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Lincoln : University of Nebraska Press, c2006.
isbn
0803244495 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780803244498 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Back to the future: France and penal colonization -- The desire to deport: the recidivist of fin de siècle France -- Life in the penal colony: the view from above and below -- The lords of discipline: the French penal colony service -- The battle over the bagnard: tropical medicine in the bagne -- The not-so-fatal shore: the criminological conception of the fin de siècle -- Bagne -- The bagne obscura: representational crisis and the twentieth century.
catalogue key
5942075
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [185]-205) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"An engaging and well-researched account of the 100-year histories of the penal colonies of French Guiana and New Caledonia. . . . Beyond Papillon makes important contributions to the histories of colonization and crime and punishment. . . . The very idea of creating overseas penal colonies presents us with troubling questions about how societies deal with offenders against the social order, and Toth's discussion provides historical perspectives on important contemporary debates."Deborah Neill, Itinerario
"An engaging and well-researched account of the 100-year histories of the penal colonies of French Guiana and New Caledonia. . . .Beyond Papillonmakes important contributions to the histories of colonization and crime and punishment. . . . The very idea of creating overseas penal colonies presents us with troubling questions about how societies deal with offenders against the social order, and Toth's discussion provides historical perspectives on important contemporary debates."Deborah Neill,Itinerario
"...the appearance of Toth's book is welcome indeed...Toth's chapter about internal life, especially the perspective from below, offers fascinating reading...the entire chapter 7 again offers fascinating reading" Pieter SpierenburgCrime, History & Societies2009, Vol. 13, No. 1 "Stephen A. Toth adds to the growing literature on colonial police forces and prisons with this sophisticated, archivally grounded history of French penal colonies in French Guiana and New Caledonia from their creation in 1854 to their final closure in 1952. . . . [T]his is a very satisfying piece of work, a welcome addition to new colonial history."American Historical Review
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
For French criminologists and colonialists of the mid 19th century, the penal colonies of Guiana and New Caledonia seemed to satisfy two needs, namely, to incarcerate a growing number of criminals and to supply manpower for these developing colonies. This text is an examination of this institution.
Main Description
For French criminologists and colonialists of the mid-nineteenth century, the penal colonies of Guiana and New Caledonia seemed to satisfy two needs, namely, to incarcerate a growing number of criminals and to supply manpower for these developing colonies. But were these two goals not contradictory? Was the primary purpose of the penal colonies to punish or to colonize? In the prisons, inmates found means of subversion, guards resisted militaristic discipline, and camp commanders fought physicians for authority. Back in themetropole, journalistic exposes catered to the public's fascination with the penal colonies' horror and exoticism. An understanding of modern France is not complete without an examination of this institution, which existed for more than a century and imprisoned more than one hundred thousand people. Stephen A. Toth invites readers to experience the prisons firsthand. Through a careful analysis of criminal case files, administrative records, and prisoner biographies, Toth reconstructs life in the penal colonies and examines how the social sciences, tropical medicine, and sensational journalism evaluated and exploited the inmates' experiences. In exploring the disjuncture between the real and the imagined, he moves beyond mythic characterizations of the penal colonies to reveal how power, discipline, and punishment were construed and enforced in these prison outposts.
Main Description
For French criminologists and colonialists of the mid-nineteenth century, the penal colonies of Guiana and New Caledonia seemed to satisfy two needs, namely, to incarcerate a growing number of criminals and to supply manpower for these developing colonies. But were these two goals not contradictory? Was the primary purpose of the penal colonies to punish or to colonize? In the prisons, inmates found means of subversion, guards resisted militaristic discipline, and camp commanders fought physicians for authority. Back in the metropole , journalistic exposes catered to the public's fascination with the penal colonies' horror and exoticism. An understanding of modern France is not complete without an examination of this institution, which existed for more than a century and imprisoned more than one hundred thousand people. Stephen A. Toth invites readers to experience the prisons firsthand. Through a careful analysis of criminal case files, administrative records, and prisoner biographies, Toth reconstructs life in the penal colonies and examines how the social sciences, tropical medicine, and sensational journalism evaluated and exploited the inmates' experiences. In exploring the disjuncture between the real and the imagined, he moves beyond mythic characterizations of the penal colonies to reveal how power, discipline, and punishment were construed and enforced in these prison outposts.
Main Description
For French criminologists and colonialists of the mid-nineteenth century, the penal colonies of Guiana and New Caledonia seemed to satisfy two needs, namely, to incarcerate a growing number of criminals and to supply manpower for these developing colonies. But were these two goals not contradictory? Was the primary purpose of the penal colonies to punish or to colonize? In the prisons, inmates found means of subversion, guards resisted militaristic discipline, and camp commanders fought physicians for authority. Back in themetropole, journalistic exposes catered to the public's fascination with the penal colonies' horror and exoticism.An understanding of modern France is not complete without an examination of this institution, which existed for more than a century and imprisoned more than one hundred thousand people. Stephen A. Toth invites readers to experience the prisons firsthand. Through a careful analysis of criminal case files, administrative records, and prisoner biographies, Toth reconstructs life in the penal colonies and examines how the social sciences, tropical medicine, and sensational journalism evaluated and exploited the inmates' experiences. In exploring the disjuncture between the real and the imagined, he moves beyond mythic characterizations of the penal colonies to reveal how power, discipline, and punishment were construed and enforced in these prison outposts.
Main Description
For French criminologists and colonialists of the mid-nineteenth century, the penal colonies of Guiana and New Caledonia seemed to satisfy two needs, namely, to incarcerate a growing number of criminals and to supply manpower for these developing colonies. But were these two goals not self-contradictory? Was the primary purpose of the penal colonies to punish or to colonize? In the prisons, inmates found means of subversion, guards resisted militaristic discipline, and camp commanders fought physicians for authority. Back in themetropole, journalistic exposés catered to the public's fascination with the penal colonies' horror and exoticism.An understanding of modern France is not complete without an examination of this institution, which existed for more than a century and imprisoned more than one hundred thousand people. Stephen A. Toth invites readers to experience the prisons firsthand. Through a careful analysis of criminal case files, administrative records, and prisoner biographies, Toth reconstructs life in the penal colonies and examines how the social sciences, tropical medicine, and sensational journalism evaluated and exploited the inmates' experiences. In exploring the disjuncture between the real and the imagined, he moves beyond mythic characterizations of the penal colonies and reveals how power, discipline, and punishment were construed and enforced in these prison outposts.Stephen A. Toth is an assistant professor of history at Arizona State University's West campus.
Main Description
From the France Overseas series View the Table of Contents and read an excerpt For French criminologists and colonialists of the mid-nineteenth century, the penal colonies of Guiana and New Caledonia seemed to satisfy two needs, namely, to incarcerate a growing number of criminals and to supply manpower for these developing colonies. But were these two goals not contradictory? Was the primary purpose of the penal colonies to punish or to colonize? In the prisons, inmates found means of subversion, guards resisted militaristic discipline, and camp commanders fought physicians for authority. Back in themetropole, journalistic exposes catered to the public's fascination with the penal colonies' horror and exoticism. An understanding of modern France is not complete without an examination of this institution, which existed for more than a century and imprisoned more than one hundred thousand people. Stephen A. Toth invites readers to experience the prisons firsthand. Through a careful analysis of criminal case files, administrative records, and prisoner biographies, Toth reconstructs life in the penal colonies and examines how the social sciences, tropical medicine, and sensational journalism evaluated and exploited the inmates' experiences. In exploring the disjuncture between the real and the imagined, he moves beyond mythic characterizations of the penal colonies to reveal how power, discipline, and punishment were construed and enforced in these prison outposts. Stephen A. Toth is an assistant professor of history at Arizona State University's West campus. Also from the series:French Colonialism Unmasked: The Vichy Years in French West Africaby Ruth Ginio
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. xi
Back to the Future: France and Penal Colonizationp. 1
The Desire to Deport: The Recidivist of Fin de Siecle Francep. 21
Life in the Penal Colony: The View from Above and Belowp. 39
The Lords of Discipline: The French Penal Colony Servicep. 59
The Battle over the Bagnard: Tropical Medicine in the Bagnep. 83
The Not-So-Fatal Shore: The Criminological Conception of the Fin de Siecle Bagnep. 101
The Bagne Obscura: Representational Crisis and the Twentieth Centuryp. 121
Conclusionp. 147
Notesp. 155
Bibliographyp. 185
Indexp. 207
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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