Catalogue


A companion to the Roman Republic /
edited by Nathan Rosenstein and Robert Morstein-Marx.
imprint
Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2006.
description
xxx, 737 p. : ill., maps
ISBN
1405102179 (hardcover : alk. paper), 9781405102179 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Malden, MA : Blackwell Pub., 2006.
isbn
1405102179 (hardcover : alk. paper)
9781405102179 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5940947
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-08-01:
Another entry in academic publishers' efforts to produce a definitive "Companion to (literary/historical) Topic X." Blackwell offers this weighty tome several years after Harriet Flower's The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic (CH, Oct'04, 42-0688). Comparison is inevitable (not least because of some overlap in contributors). The Cambridge volume pays somewhat more attention to gender and cultural topics, while this volume offers a more traditional coverage of political, social, and cultural history for the period ca. 500 to 31 BCE. Blackwell's (acknowledged expert) editors have skillfully retained the individual voices of 29 very diverse contributors, while producing a highly readable compendium. The editors suggest that this volume should replace the standard textbooks of H. H. Scullard. It will not, but it does provide readable, expert surveys of the rise of Roman power in the Mediterranean in the formative imperial era. In addition to chapters on political and social topics, this Companion offers fine surveys of topography, literature and literary sources, law, art and architecture, and Roman "cultural identity." The volume concludes with four valuable discussions of historiographical controversies. The voice (and the evidence thereof) of the rural and provincial populace of the Roman world does not here speak loudly. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. P. B. Harvey, Jr. Pennsylvania State University, University Park Campus
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A Companion to the Roman Republic is a really exciting new resource. The contributors are individually heavy-hitters and collectively form a first-rate international team. The work covers not just the topics one would have counted on but other new ones that deserve to become canonical. I'm happy that this work is now available both for myself and for my students." - Andrew M. Riggsby, University of Texas, Austin "A comprehensive work ... It far outstrips any competitor in this subject ... I only wish it had been available when I was teaching the Late Republic." - John Murrell, Journal of Classics Teaching "A kaleidoscopic variety of points of views and insightful commentaries that finally does justice to the complexity of the subject and of its possible interpretations, while always remaining readable and clear." - Nicola Terrenato, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
"A Companion to the Roman Republic is a really exciting new resource. The contributors are individually heavy-hitters and collectively form a first-rate international team. The work covers not just the topics one would have counted on but other new ones that deserve to become canonical. I'm happy that this work is now available both for myself and for my students." Andrew M. Riggsby, University of Texas, Austin"A kaleidoscopic variety of points of views and insightful commentaries that finally does justice to the complexity of the subject and of its possible interpretations, while always remaining readable and clear." Nicola Terrenato, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
A Companion to the Roman Republic is a really exciting new resource. The contributors are individually heavy-hitters and collectively form a first-rate international team. The work covers not just the topics one would have counted on but other new ones that deserve to become canonical. I'm happy that this work is now available both for myself and for my students." Andrew M. Riggsby, University of Texas, AustinA kaleidoscopic variety of points of views and insightful commentaries that finally does justice to the complexity of the subject and of its possible interpretations, while always remaining readable and clear." Nicola Terrenato, University of North Carolina at Chapel HillIt does provide readable, expert surveys of the rise of Roman power in the Mediterranean in the formative imperial era. In addition to chapters on political and social topics, this Companion offers fine surveys of topography, literature and literary sources, law, art and architecture, and Roman 'cultural identity.'...Highly recommended." Choice
"A Companion to the Roman Republic is a really exciting new resource. The contributors are individually heavy-hitters and collectively form a first-rate international team. The work covers not just the topics one would have counted on but other new ones that deserve to become canonical. I'm happy that this work is now available both for myself and for my students." Andrew M. Riggsby, University of Texas, Austin"A comprehensive work ... It far outstrips any competitor in this subject ... I only wish it had been available when I was teaching the Late Republic." John Murrell, Journal of Classics Teaching"A kaleidoscopic variety of points of views and insightful commentaries that finally does justice to the complexity of the subject and of its possible interpretations, while always remaining readable and clear." Nicola Terrenato, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"It does provide readable, expert surveys of the rise of Roman power in the Mediterranean in the formative imperial era. In addition to chapters on political and social topics, this Companion offers fine surveys of topography, literature and literary sources, law, art and architecture, and Roman 'cultural identity.'...Highly recommended." Choice"[Authors] do an excellent job of re-packaging Roman Republican history ... and I applaud their efforts to provide ... interesting debates within recent scholarship." New England Classical Journal
"Students cannot fail to benefit from the eminent collaborators [in this Companion].... Individual contributions have much for anyone keen to catch up." (Greece & Rome, 2008)"It does provide readable, expert surveys of the rise of Roman power in the Mediterranean in the formative imperial era. In addition to chapters on political and social topics, this Companion offers fine surveys of topography, literature and literary sources, law, art and architecture, and Roman 'cultural identity.'...Highly recommended." Choice"[Authors] do an excellent job of re-packaging Roman Republican history ... and I applaud their efforts to provide ... interesting debates within recent scholarship." New England Classical Journal
"This book, which will be many things to many readers, will be valuable as a modern source and as a reference work vital in what is the ever increasing complex world of ancient historical research." ( Scholia Reviews , 2009) "Students cannot fail to benefit from the eminent collaborators [in this Companion].... Individual contributions have much for anyone keen to catch up." ( Greece & Rome , 2008) "It does provide readable, expert surveys of the rise of Roman power in the Mediterranean in the formative imperial era. In addition to chapters on political and social topics, this Companion offers fine surveys of topography, literature and literary sources, law, art and architecture, and Roman 'cultural identity.'...Highly recommended." ( Choice) "[Authors] do an excellent job of re-packaging Roman Republican history ... and I applaud their efforts to provide ... interesting debates within recent scholarship." ( New England Classical Journal)
"This book, which will be many things to many readers, will be valuable as a modern source and as a reference work vital in what is the ever increasing complex world of ancient historical research." (Scholia Reviews, 2009)"Students cannot fail to benefit from the eminent collaborators [in this Companion].... Individual contributions have much for anyone keen to catch up." (Greece & Rome, 2008)"It does provide readable, expert surveys of the rise of Roman power in the Mediterranean in the formative imperial era. In addition to chapters on political and social topics, this Companion offers fine surveys of topography, literature and literary sources, law, art and architecture, and Roman 'cultural identity.'...Highly recommended." ( Choice)"[Authors] do an excellent job of re-packaging Roman Republican history ... and I applaud their efforts to provide ... interesting debates within recent scholarship." ( New England Classical Journal)
"A Companion to the Roman Republic is a really exciting new resource. The contributors are individually heavy-hitters and collectively form a first-rate international team. The work covers not just the topics one would have counted on but other new ones that deserve to become canonical. I'm happy that this work is now available both for myself and for my students." Andrew M. Riggsby, University of Texas, Austin "A kaleidoscopic variety of points of views and insightful commentaries that finally does justice to the complexity of the subject and of its possible interpretations, while always remaining readable and clear." Nicola Terrenato, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill "It does provide readable, expert surveys of the rise of Roman power in the Mediterranean in the formative imperial era. In addition to chapters on political and social topics, this Companion offers fine surveys of topography, literature and literary sources, law, art and architecture, and Roman 'cultural identity.'...Highly recommended." Choice
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, August 2007
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
This Companion provides an authoritative and up-to-date overview of Roman republican history as it is currently practiced. The volumetakes account of recent developments that have enriched our picture of the Republic. These include the continuing archaeological exploration of Italy, increasingly sophisticated approaches to textual sources, and the opening up of new areas of historical study and debate such as the nature of the republican political system, Roman identity formation, representation of the body, collective memory, and demography and social structure. At the same time, the book retains the drama of the Republic's rise and fall. The Companion is divided into three parts. The opening section emphasizes both the evidence of texts and physical remains, and the models and assumptions that scholars bring to these artifacts. This section includes coverage of the role played by the physical geography and environment of Italy. The second part offers a compact but detailed narrative of military and political developments from the birth of Rome through to the death of Julius Caesar; while the third and longest part highlights recent research and current controversies in the field.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In offering an authoritative overview of the history of the Roman republic, this text highlights developments in modern historiography, including archaeological discoveries, fresh approaches to textual sources, and the opening of new areas of historical study.
Long Description
This Companion provides an authoritative and up-to-date overview of Roman republican history as it is currently practiced. The volume takes account of recent developments that have enriched our picture of the Republic. These include the continuing archaeological exploration of Italy, increasingly sophisticated approaches to textual sources, and the opening up of new areas of historical study and debate such as the nature of the republican political system, Roman identity formation, representation of the body, collective memory, and demography and social structure. At the same time, the book retains the drama of the Republicrs" s rise and fall. The Companion is divided into three parts. The opening section emphasizes both the evidence of texts and physical remains, and the models and assumptions that scholars bring to these artifacts. This section includes coverage of the role played by the physical geography and environment of Italy. The second part offers a compact but detailed narrative of military and political developments from the birth of Rome through to the death of Julius Caesar; while the third and longest part highlights recent research and current controversies in the field.
Main Description
This Companion provides an authoritative and up-to-date overview of Roman Republican history as it is currently practiced. Highlights recent developments, including archaeological discoveries, fresh approaches to textual sources, and the opening up of new areas of historical study. Retains the drama of the Republic's rise and fall. Emphasizes not just the evidence of texts and physical remains, but also the models and assumptions that scholars bring to these artefacts. Looks at the role played by the physical geography and environment of Italy. Offers a compact but detailed narrative of military and political developments from the birth of the Roman Republic through to the death of Julius Caesar. Discusses current controversies in the field.
Main Description
This Companion provides an authoritative and up-to-date overview of Roman Republican history as it is currently practiced. Highlights recent developments, including archaeological discoveries, fresh approaches to textual sources, and the opening up of new areas of historical study Retains the drama of the Republic's rise and fall Emphasizes not just the evidence of texts and physical remains, but also the models and assumptions that scholars bring to these artefacts Looks at the role played by the physical geography and environment of Italy Offers a compact but detailed narrative of military and political developments from the birth of the Roman Republic through to the death of Julius Caesar Discusses current controversies in the field
Table of Contents
List of Mapsp. x
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Notes on Contributorsp. xiv
Mapsp. xix
Abbreviationsp. xxvii
Prefacep. xxviii
Introductoryp. 1
Methods, Models, and Historiographyp. 3
Literary Sourcesp. 29
Epigraphy and Numismaticsp. 51
The Topography and Archaeology of Republican Romep. 81
The Physical Geography and Environment of Republican Italyp. 102
Narrativep. 123
Between Myth and History: Rome's Rise from Village to Empire (the Eighth Century to 264)p. 125
Mediterranean Empire (264-134)p. 147
From the Gracchi to the First Civil War (133-70)p. 167
The Final Crisis (69-44)p. 190
Civic Structuresp. 213
Communicating with the Godsp. 215
Law in the Roman Republicp. 236
The Constitution of the Roman Republicp. 256
Army and Societyp. 278
Societyp. 297
Social Structure and Demographyp. 299
Finding Roman Womenp. 324
Political Culturep. 343
The City of Romep. 345
Aristocratic Valuesp. 365
Popular Power in the Roman Republicp. 383
Patronagep. 401
Rhetoric and Public Lifep. 421
The Republican Bodyp. 439
The Creation of a Roman Identityp. 457
Romans and Othersp. 459
History and Collective Memory in the Middle Republicp. 478
Art and Architecture in the Roman Republicp. 496
Literaturep. 543
Controversiesp. 565
Conceptualizing Roman Imperial Expansion under the Republic: An Introductionp. 567
The Economy: Agrarian Change During the Second Centuryp. 590
Rome and Italyp. 606
The Transformation of the Republicp. 625
Bibliographyp. 638
Indexp. 695
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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