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The conversion of Britain : religion, politics, and society in Britain, c.600-800 /
Barbara Yorke.
imprint
Harlow, England ; Toronto : Pearson Education, 2006.
description
xiii, 333 p. : .maps ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0582772923, 9780582772922
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Harlow, England ; Toronto : Pearson Education, 2006.
isbn
0582772923
9780582772922
catalogue key
5937239
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [290]-324) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-07-01:
Yorke (Univ. of Winchester), author of numerous works on Anglo-Saxon England (e.g., Wessex in the Early Middle Ages, CH, May'96, 33-5291), provides an excellent study of a culturally diverse, politically dynamic period in British history. Taking as its subject all the peoples of Britain--the British, Picts, Irish, and Anglo-Saxons--the author utilizes the Christian conversion of England, Wales, and Scotland as a frame for investigating contemporary political and social institutions and practices. Yorke introduces the sources for this period, including such documents as chronicles, law codes, poetry, and hagiography as well as inscriptions, burial sites, and artifacts. She examines each people in the context of the others, using this examination as a base from which to closely chart the different peoples' experience of conversion, the development of the church in their territories, the cultures of the church throughout Britain, and their interactions with political and social institutions and practices. By deft and cautious use of the sources, Yorke shows how conversion or resistance to Christianization often depended as much on local politics as on the customs or beliefs of the evangelized peoples of Britain. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. D. A. Rivard Cottey College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"a most promising series intellectually as well as one that offers much to students." THES Review of the first three books in the Religion, Politics and Society in Britain series: ''All three writers have made distinguished contributions to the specialist literature and, on the basis of these books, this will prove a most promising series intellectually, as well as one that offers much to students.'' Jeremy Black, Professor of History, Exeter University
"a most promising series intellectually as well as one that offers much to students." THES Review of the first three books in theReligion, Politics and Society in Britainseries: ''All three writers have made distinguished contributions to the specialist literature and, on the basis of these books, this will prove a most promising series intellectually, as well as one that offers much to students.'' Jeremy Black, Professor of History, Exeter University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2007
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Religion, Politics and Society in Britain Series Editor: Keith RobbinsThroughout the history of Britain religion has been a potent and influential force, permeating social and political life at many different levels. Yet it has often been written about in restricted institutional terms without accounting for the ways in which religious belief and practice have been bound up with wider social and political developments.Religion, Politics and Society in Britain shifts the focus on this complex and fluctuating relationship and investigates the changing role of religion in British life from 600 AD to the present.The Britain of 600-800 AD was populated by four distinct peoples: the British, Picts, Irish and Anglo-Saxons. It was a period of cultural diversity within Britain in which the languages of Gaelic, Britonnic and Latin were spoken. In 600 the British and the Irish were already Christians. In contrast the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons and Picts had only just begun, and continued to gather momentum during the 7th century. Religion was one of the ways through which cultural difference was expressed, and in different areas of Britain the nature of the dominant religion might be strongly influenced by the concerns of kings and their entourages.In the past, the early medieval history of England, Wales and Scotland has been considered separately for each province and the religion of each area has been studied in isolation from its society and politics. By contrast, in this new book. Barbara Yorke uses the Christian conversion of the different peoples of Britain as a framework through which to explore the workings of their political systems and the structures of their social systems. Because Christianity adapted to and affected existing religious beliefs and social norms wherever it was introduced, it proves the ideal medium through which to study these interrelated aspects of human society.Barbara Yorkeis Professor of Early Medieval History at the University of Winchester. She is author ofNunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses(2003),The Anglo-Saxons(1999),Wessex in the Early Middle Ages(1995) andKings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England(1990).
Back Cover Copy
Religion, Politics and Society in Britain Series Editor: Keith Robbins Throughout the history of Britain religion has been a potent and influential force, permeating social and political life at many different levels. Yet it has often been written about in restricted institutional terms without accounting for the ways in which religious belief and practice have been bound up with wider social and political developments. Religion, Politics and Society in Britain shifts the focus on this complex and fluctuating relationship and investigates the changing role of religion in British life from 600 AD to the present. The Britain of 600-800 AD was populated by four distinct peoples: the British, Picts, Irish and Anglo-Saxons. It was a period of cultural diversity within Britain in which the languages of Gaelic, Britonnic and Latin were spoken. In 600 the British and the Irish were already Christians. In contrast the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons and Picts had only just begun, and continued to gather momentum during the 7th century. Religion was one of the ways through which cultural difference was expressed, and in different areas of Britain the nature of the dominant religion might be strongly influenced by the concerns of kings and their entourages. In the past, the early medieval history of England, Wales and Scotland has been considered separately for each province and the religion of each area has been studied in isolation from its society and politics. By contrast, in this new book. Barbara Yorke uses the Christian conversion of the different peoples of Britain as a framework through which to explore the workings of their political systems and the structures of their social systems. Because Christianity adapted to and affected existing religious beliefs and social norms wherever it was introduced, it proves the ideal medium through which to study these interrelated aspects of human society. Barbara Yorke is Professor of Early Medieval History at the University of Winchester. She is author of Nunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses (2003), The Anglo-Saxons (1999), Wessex in the Early Middle Ages (1995) and Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England (1990).
Back Cover Copy
Religion, Politics and Society in Britain Series Editor: Keith Robbins Throughout the history of Britain religion has been a potent and influential force, permeating social and political life at many different levels. Yet it has often been written about in restricted institutional terms without accounting for the ways in which religious belief and practice have been bound up with wider social and political developments.Religion, Politics and Society in Britain shifts the focus on this complex and fluctuating relationship and investigates the changing role of religion in British life from 600 AD to the present. The Britain of 600-800 AD was populated by four distinct peoples: the British, Picts, Irish and Anglo-Saxons. It was a period of cultural diversity within Britain in which the languages of Gaelic, Britonnic and Latin were spoken. In 600 the British and the Irish were already Christians. In contrast the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons and Picts had only just begun, and continued to gather momentum during the 7th century. Religion was one of the ways through which cultural difference was expressed, and in different areas of Britain the nature of the dominant religion might be strongly influenced by the concerns of kings and their entourages. In the past, the early medieval history of England, Wales and Scotland has been considered separately for each province and the religion of each area has been studied in isolation from its society and politics. By contrast, in this new book. Barbara Yorke uses the Christian conversion of the different peoples of Britain as a framework through which to explore the workings of their political systems and the structures of their social systems. Because Christianity adapted to and affected existing religious beliefs and social norms wherever it was introduced, it proves the ideal medium through which to study these interrelated aspects of human society. Barbara Yorkeis Professor of Early Medieval History at the University of Winchester. She is author ofNunneries and the Anglo-Saxon Royal Houses(2003),The Anglo-Saxons(1999),Wessex in the Early Middle Ages(1995) and Kings and Kingdoms of Early Anglo-Saxon England (1990).
Bowker Data Service Summary
Concerned with the interaction between religion, society and politics, from c600-800, this book compares and contrasts the circumstances in which Christianity became the religion of the four early medieval peoples of Britain. It is suitable for undergraduate students studying early medieval Britain and religious history.
Long Description
The Britainof 600-800 AD was populated by four distinct peoples; the British, Picts, Irish and Anglo-Saxons. They spoke 3 different languages, Gaelic, Brittonic and Old English, and lived in a diverse cultural environment. In 600 the British and the Irish were already Christians. In contrast the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons and Picts occurred somewhat later, at the end of the 6th and during the 7th century. Religion was one of the ways through which cultural difference was expressed, and the rulers of different areas of Britain dictated the nature of the dominant religion in areas under their control. This book uses the Conversion and the Christianisation of the different peoples of Britainas a framework through which to explore the workings of their political systems and the structures of their society. Because Christianity adapted to and affected the existing religious beliefs and social norms wherever it was introduced, it' s the perfect medium through which to study various aspects of society that are difficult to study by any other means.
Main Description
The Britain of 600-800 AD was populated by four distinct peoples; the British, Picts, Irish and Anglo-Saxons. They spoke 3 different languages, Gaelic, Brittonic and Old English, and lived in a diverse cultural environment. In 600 the British and the Irish were already Christians. In contrast the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons and Picts occurred somewhat later, at the end of the 6th and during the 7th century. Religion was one of the ways through which cultural difference was expressed, and the rulers of different areas of Britain dictated the nature of the dominant religion in areas under their control. This book uses the Conversion and the Christianisation of the different peoples of Britainas a framework through which to explore the workings of their political systems and the structures of their society. Because Christianity adapted to and affected the existing religious beliefs and social norms wherever it was introduced, it#146;s the perfect medium through which to study various aspects of society that are difficult to study by any other means.
Main Description
This is the story of Britain's emergence from the Dark Ages and conversion from the paganism of the Celts and Anglo-Saxons to the monotheism of Christianity. Plenty of coverage of the Celts, Picts and Pagans - very popular topics Covers all of Britain not just England Author is one of the most established authorities on this period of history Will be bought by students studying religious history and early medieval history One of the titles launching the new Longman Religion, Politics and Society in Britain series which examines religion in Britain from pre-Christian times to the end of the 20th century
Main Description
This is the story of Britain's emergence from the Dark Ages and conversion from the paganism of the Celts and Anglo-Saxons to the monotheism of Christianity. Plenty of coverage of the Celts, Picts and Pagans - very popular topics Covers all of Britain not just England Author is one of the most established authorities on this period of history Will be bought by students studying religious history and early medieval history One of the titles launching the new LongmanReligion, Politics and Society in Britainseries which examines religion in Britain from pre-Christian times to the end of the 20th century
Table of Contents
Maps Introduction
Politics and Society in Britain c.600-800
The Conversion of Britain to Christianity
The Organisation and Culture of the Church in Early Medieval Britain
Society, Politics and Religion in Early Medieval Britain Conclusion
Timeline of main events and people
Pictish kings from king lists P and Q
The Kings of Northumbria from Æthelfrith to Eardwulf
The kings of Mercia from Penda to Coenwulf
The union of the Bernician and Deiran royal houses through marriage
Two rival theories for the descent of the Pictish kings Constantine and Onuist, the sons of Uurguist/Fergus
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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