Catalogue


Picturing the city : urban vision and the Ashcan School /
Rebecca Zurier.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2006.
description
x, 407 p.
ISBN
0520220188 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520220188 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2006.
isbn
0520220188 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520220188 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
The setting: Another look at the Ashcan School -- Seeing New York: the turn-of-the-century culture of looking -- A walk through the city on paper: the tradition of the mobile observer -- The artists -- Robert Henri and the real thing -- The reporter's vision: Everett Shinn and the city as spectacle -- The cartoonist's vision (Part 1): William Glackens and the legible city -- The cartoonist's vision (Part 2): Bellows, Luks, and urban difference -- John Sloan's urban vision -- The storyteller's vision: John Sloan and the limits of Visual knowledge -- Conclusion: the legacy of the Ashcan School.
catalogue key
5932508
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
New York City Book Awards, USA, 2006 : Won
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"Zurier vividly locates the Ashcan School artists within the early twentieth-century crosscurrents of newspaper journalism, literary realism, illustration, sociology, and urban spectatorship. Her compassionate study newly assesses the artists' rejection of 'genteel' New York, their alignments with mass media, and their innovative ways of seeing in the modern city."--Wanda M. Corn, author of The Great American Thing: Modern Art and National Identity, 1915-35 If the Ashcan School brought a special and embracing eye to the city, Rebecca Zurier in her richly contextual and impressively interdisciplinary book explains and evokes that historically specific urban vision in all its richness. Finally, in Picturing the City, we have the study these painters have long deserved. And we gain new and delightful access to New York City at the moment of its emergence as a compelling embodiment of metropolitan modernity."--Thomas Bender, Director, International Center for Advanced Studies, New York University " Picturing the City is both meticulous and wide-ranging in its assessment of the Ashcan artists and their passionate efforts to represent New York. It charts their pleasures and problems, warmth and prejudices, generosity and differences, originality and formula. It takes seriously their habits as journalists and provides the most complete sense of their immersion in a world of urban spectatorship and vision. Rebecca Zurier has written a wonderful, timely book that will be a benchmark for any future discussions of them."--Anthony W. Lee, author of Picturing Chinatown: Art and Orientalism in San Francisco "Rebecca Zurier takes us on an intellectually exhilarating and breathtakingly beautiful visual voyage through turn-of-the-century New York City as the Ashcan painters saw it. As we watch them learn a new way of looking in the commercially dynamic, sensual New York of a century ago, we too see that time and place with fresh eyes. Inevitably, thanks to Zurier, the way we look at city life today will change as well."--Lizabeth Cohen, author of A Consumers' Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America
Flap Copy
"Zurier vividly locates the Ashcan School artists within the early twentieth-century crosscurrents of newspaper journalism, literary realism, illustration, sociology, and urban spectatorship. Her compassionate study newly assesses the artists' rejection of 'genteel' New York, their alignments with mass media, and their innovative ways of seeing in the modern city."--Wanda M. Corn, author of "The Great American Thing: Modern Art and National Identity, 1915-35" If the Ashcan School brought a special and embracing eye to the city, Rebecca Zurier in her richly contextual and impressively interdisciplinary book explains and evokes that historically specific urban vision in all its richness. Finally, in "Picturing the City," we have the study these painters have long deserved. And we gain new and delightful access to New York City at the moment of its emergence as a compelling embodiment of metropolitan modernity."--Thomas Bender, Director, International Center for Advanced Studies, New York University ""Picturing the City" is both meticulous and wide-ranging in its assessment of the Ashcan artists and their passionate efforts to represent New York. It charts their pleasures and problems, warmth and prejudices, generosity and differences, originality and formula. It takes seriously their habits as journalists and provides the most complete sense of their immersion in a world of urban spectatorship and vision. Rebecca Zurier has written a wonderful, timely book that will be a benchmark for any future discussions of them."--Anthony W. Lee, author of "Picturing Chinatown: Art and Orientalism in San Francisco" "Rebecca Zurier takes us on an intellectually exhilarating andbreathtakingly beautiful visual voyage through turn-of-the-century New York City as the Ashcan painters saw it. As we watch them learn a new way of looking in the commercially dynamic, sensual New York of a century ago, we too see that time and place with fresh eyes. Inevitably, thanks to Zurier, the way we look at city life today will change as well."--Lizabeth Cohen, author of A "Consumers' Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America"
Flap Copy
"Zurier vividly locates the Ashcan School artists within the early twentieth-century crosscurrents of newspaper journalism, literary realism, illustration, sociology, and urban spectatorship. Her compassionate study newly assesses the artists' rejection of 'genteel' New York, their alignments with mass media, and their innovate ways of seeing in the modern city."--Wanda M. Corn, author ofThe Great American Thing: Modern Art and National Identity, 1915-35 If the Ashcan School brought a special and embracing eye to the city, Rebecca Zurier in her richly contextual and impressively interdisciplinary book explains and evokes that historically specific urban vision in all its richness. Finally, inPicturing the City,we have the study these painters have long deserved. And we gain new and delightful access to New York City at the moment of its emergence as a compelling embodiment of metropolitan modernity."--Thomas Bender, Director, International Center for Advanced Studies, New York University "Picturing the Cityis both meticulous and wide-ranging in its assessment of the Ashcan artists and their passionate efforts to represent New York. It charts their pleasures and problems, warmth and prejudices, generosity and differences, originality and formula. It takes seriously their habits as journalists and provides the most complete sense of their immersion in a world of urban spectatorship and vision. Rebecca Zurier has written a wonderful, timely book that will be a benchmark for any future discussions of them."--Anthony W. Lee, author ofPicturing Chinatown: Art and Orientalism in San Francisco "Rebecca Zurier takes us on an intellectually exhilarating and breathtakingly beautiful visual voyage through turn-of-the-century New York City as the Ashcan painters saw it. As we watch them learn a new way of looking in the commercially dynamic, sensual New York of a century ago, we too see that time and place with fresh eyes. Inevitably, thanks to Zurier, the way we look at city life today will change as well."--Lizabeth Cohen, author of AConsumers' Republic: The Politics of Mass Consumption in Postwar America
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Engages in the most valuable kind of interdisciplinary criticism, one whose breadth of attention is united with deep, discipline-specific close reading of technique."
"Engages in the most valuable kind of interdisciplinary criticism, one whose breadth of attention is united with deep, discipline-specific close reading of technique."-- Modernism/Modernity
"Makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the Ashcan school."-- Art Bulletin (Caa)
"Makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the Ashcan school."
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Taking a different look at the group of urban realists known as the Ashcan School, this book examines the booming cultures of vision and representation in early 20th century New York. It considers what it meant to live in a city where strangers habitually watched each other and public life seemed to consist of continual display.
Long Description
Picturing the City takes an innovative look at the group of urban realists known as the Ashcan School, and at the booming cultures of vision and representation in early twentieth-century New York. Offering fresh insights into the development of modern cities and modern art in America, Rebecca Zurier considers what it meant to live in a city where strangers habitually watched each other and public life seemed to consist of continual display, as new classes of immigrants and working women claimed their places in the metropolis. Through her study of six artists--George Bellows, William Glackens, Robert Henri, George Luks, Everett Shinn, and John Sloan--Zurier illuminates the quest for new forms of realism to describe changes in urban life, commercial culture, and codes of social conduct in the early 1900s. Synthesizing visual and literary analysis with urban cultural history, Picturing the City focuses new attention on the materiality and design process of pictures. The author scrutinizes all manner of visual activity, from the pandemonium of comics to the mise-en-scene of early movies, from the mark of an individual pen stroke to a glance on the street, from illustrators' manuals to ambitious paintings that became icons of American art. By situating the Ashcan School within its proper visual culture, Zurier opens up the question of what the artists' "realism" meant at a time when many other forms of representation, including journalism and cinema, were competing to define "real life" in New York City.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction
The Setting
Another Look at the Ashcan School
Seeing New York: The Turn-of-the-Century Culture of Looking
A Walk through the City on Paper: The Tradition of the Mobile Observer
The Artists
Robert Henri and the Real Thing
The Reporter's Vision: Everett Shinn and the City as Spectacle
The Cartoonist's Vision (Part 1): William Glackens and the Legible City
The Cartoonist's Vision (Part 2): Bellows, Luks, and Urban Difference
John Sloan's Urban Vision
The Storyteller's Vision: John Sloan and the Limits of Visual Knowledge
Conclusion: The Legacy of the Ashcan School
Notes
Selected Bibliography
List of Illustrations
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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