Catalogue

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Learning to stand & speak : women, education, and public life in America's republic /
Mary Kelley.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press ; Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, c2006.
description
x, 294 p.
ISBN
080783064X (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807830642 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press ; Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia, c2006.
isbn
080783064X (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807830642 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5932468
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
Education was decisive in recasting women's subjectivity and the lived reality of their collective experience in post-Revolutionary and antebellum America. Asking how and why women shaped their lives anew through education, Mary Kelley measures the significant transformation in individual and social identities fostered by female academies and seminaries. Constituted in a curriculum that matched the course of study at male colleges, women's liberal learning, Kelley argues, played a key role in one of the most profound changes in gender relations in the nation's history: the movement of women into public life.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Adds considerably to the historiography on American women, education, and politics.' '”Journal of the Early Republic
"Adds considerably to the historiography on American women, education, and politics." -- Journal of the Early Republic
"Adds considerably to the historiography on American women, education, and politics." --Journal of the Early Republic
"A detailed analysis of the relationship between education and women's participation in civil society. . . .Best utilized in a course examining the historic relationship between women's education and women's participation in public life." -- Feminist Teacher
"A detailed analysis of the relationship between education and women's participation in civil society. . . .Best utilized in a course examining the historic relationship between women's education and women's participation in public life." --Feminist Teacher
"A detailed analysis of the relationship between education and women's participation in civil society. . . .Best utilized in a course examining the historic relationship between women's education and women's participation in public life." '”Feminist Teacher
"A fresh interpretation of the place of education, reading, and voluntary association in American women's lives between the Revolution and the Civil War." -- New England Quarterly
"A fresh interpretation of the place of education, reading, and voluntary association in American women's lives between the Revolution and the Civil War." --New England Quarterly
"A fresh interpretation of the place of education, reading, and voluntary association in American women's lives between the Revolution and the Civil War." '”New England Quarterly
"A landmark publication in American women's history. . . . Will guide scholarship on early America's free women and learning for years to come." -- William and Mary Quarterly
"A landmark publication in American women's history. . . . Will guide scholarship on early America's free women and learning for years to come." --William and Mary Quarterly
"A landmark publication in American women's history. . . . Will guide scholarship on early America's free women and learning for years to come." '”William and Mary Quarterly
"Ambitious and fascinating. . . . Women's voices are vibrantly present." _ Journal of American History
"Ambitious and fascinating. . . . Women's voices are vibrantly present." -- Journal of American History
"Ambitious and fascinating. . . . Women's voices are vibrantly present." --Journal of American History
"[An] innovative and meticulously researched book." _ American Antiquarian Society Newsletter
"[An] innovative and meticulously researched book." -- American Antiquarian Society Newsletter
"[An] innovative and meticulously researched book." --American Antiquarian Society Newsletter
A pathbreaking interpretation of the new and expanding spaces for female education between the Revolution and the Civil War.--John Brooke, Ohio State University
A pathbreaking interpretation of the new and expanding spaces for female education between the Revolution and the Civil War. --John Brooke, Ohio State University
"A wealth of detail about this lost world of educated women, which had a lasting impact on defining women's cultural authority in American society.' '”American Historical Review
"A wealth of detail about this lost world of educated women, which had a lasting impact on defining women's cultural authority in American society." -- American Historical Review
"A wealth of detail about this lost world of educated women, which had a lasting impact on defining women's cultural authority in American society." --American Historical Review
"Elegant. . . . Kelley has drawn from a vast array of sources, crossing regional and racial lines, to produce a meticulous argument. Her story explains rather that valorizes." _ Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"Elegant. . . . Kelley has drawn from a vast array of sources, crossing regional and racial lines, to produce a meticulous argument. Her story explains rather that valorizes." -- Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"Elegant. . . . Kelley has drawn from a vast array of sources, crossing regional and racial lines, to produce a meticulous argument. Her story explains rather that valorizes." --Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"The book's greatest strength is its archival depth and breadth. . . . Presents an impressive number of examples drawn from the experiences of women across seven decades and at least a dozen states. . . . An important resource for all historians of gender, education or print culture in early republic and antebellum America." _ Common-Place
"The book's greatest strength is its archival depth and breadth. . . . Presents an impressive number of examples drawn from the experiences of women across seven decades and at least a dozen states. . . . An important resource for all historians of gender, education or print culture in early republic and antebellum America." -- Common-Place
"The book's greatest strength is its archival depth and breadth. . . . Presents an impressive number of examples drawn from the experiences of women across seven decades and at least a dozen states. . . . An important resource for all historians of gender, education or print culture in early republic and antebellum America." --Common-Place
"This superb book persuasively and gracefully makes the case that education . . . was the decisive factor propelling women's entrance into the public sphere during the nineteenth century. . . . Deserves the widest possible readership." --The Historian
"This superb book persuasively and gracefully makes the case that education . . . was the decisive factor propelling women's entrance into the public sphere during the nineteenth century. . . . Deserves the widest possible readership." _ The Historian
"This superb book persuasively and gracefully makes the case that education . . . was the decisive factor propelling women's entrance into the public sphere during the nineteenth century. . . . Deserves the widest possible readership." -- The Historian
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Education was decisive in recasting women's subjectivity and the felt reality of their collective experience in post-Revolutionary and antebellum America. Asking how and why women shaped their lives anew through education, Mary Kelley measures the significant transformation in individual and social identities fostered by female academies and seminaries. Constituted in a curriculum that matched the course of study at male colleges, women's liberal learning, Kelley argues, played a key role in one of the most profound changes in gender relations in the nation's history: the movement of women into public life.By the 1850s, the large majority of women deeply engaged in public life as educators, writers, editors, and reformers had been schooled at female academies and seminaries. Although most women did not enter these professions, many participated in networks of readers, literary societies, or voluntary associations that became the basis for benevolent societies, reform movements, and activism in the antebellum period. Kelley's analysis demonstrates that female academies and seminaries taught women crucial writing, oration, and reasoning skills that prepared them to claim the rights and obligations of citizenship.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
List of Illustrationsp. xiii
Introductionp. 1
You Will Arrive at Distinguished Usefulness: The Grounds for Women's Entry into Public Lifep. 16
The Need of Their Genius: The Rights and Obligations of Schoolingp. 34
Female Academies Are Everywhere Establishing: Curriculum and Pedagogyp. 66
Meeting in This Social Way to Search for Truth: Literary Societies, Reading Circles, and Mutual Improvement Associationsp. 112
The Privilege of Reading: Women, Books, and Self-Imaginingp. 154
Whether to Make Her Surname More or Adams: Women Writing Women's Historyp. 191
The Mind Is, in a Sense, Its Own Home: Gendered Republicanism as Lived Experiencep. 245
Epiloguep. 275
Indexp. 281
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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