Catalogue


Women and the pamphlet culture of revolutionary England, 1640-1660 /
by Marcus Andrew Nevitt.
imprint
Aldershot, England : Ashgate, c2006.
description
xii, 218 p. : ill., facsims. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0754641155 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, England : Ashgate, c2006.
isbn
0754641155 (alk. paper)
contents note
Justification cannot be self-justification : Katherine Chidley and the discourses of religious toleration -- Agency in crisis : women write the regicide -- A woman in the business of revolutionary news : Elizabeth Alkin, "Parliament Joan", and the Commonwealth newsbook -- Clothing the naked woman : writing women's agency in revolutionary England -- Gender identities and women's agency in early modern tithe dispute.
catalogue key
5932189
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [183]-211) and index.
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Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2006
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Summaries
Long Description
Offering an analysis of the ways in which groups of non-aristocratic women circumvented a number of interdictions against female participation in the pamphlet culture of revolutionary England, this book is primarily a study of female agency. Despite the fact that pamphlets, or cheap unbound books, have recently been located among the most inclusive or democratic aspects of the social life of early modern England, this study provides a more gender-sensitive picture. Marcus Nevitt argues instead that throughout the revolutionary decades pamphlet culture is actually constructed around the public silence and exclusion of women. In support of his thesis, he discusses more familiar seventeenth-century authors such as John Milton, John Selden and Thomas Edwards in relation to the less canonical but equally forceful writings of Katherine Chidley, Elizabeth Poole, Mary Pope, 'Parliament Joan' and a large number of Quaker women.This is the first sustained study of the relationship between female agency and cheap print throughout the revolutionary decades 1640 to 1660. It adds to the study of gender in the field of the English Revolution by engaging with recent work in the history of the book, stressing the materiality of texts and the means and physical processes by which women's writing emerged through the printing press and networks of publication and dissemination. It will stimulate welcome debate about the nature and limits of discursive freedom in the early modern period, and for women in particular.
Main Description
An important study of the relationship between female agency and cheap print throughout the revolutionary decades 1640 to 1660, this book offers an analysis of the ways in which groups of non-aristocratic women circumvented a number of assumptions about female participation in the pamphlet culture of revolutionary England. Through analyses of both the rhetorical and material aspects of that culture, Marcus Nevitt demonstrates that some of the key political and religious debates of the 1640s and 50s were actually reliant upon the public silencing and exclusion of women.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Part of the 'Women and Gender in the Early Modern World' series, this text includes chapters on 'justification cannot be self-justification'; agency in crisis; a woman in the business of revolutionary news; and gender identities and women's agency in early modern tithe dispute.
Table of Contents
Introduction: Women's agency and early modern pamphlet culture
'Justification cannot be self-justification': Katherine Chidley and the discourses of religious toleration
Agency in crisis: women write the regicide
A woman in the business of revolutionary news: Elizabeth Alkin, 'Parliament Joan' and the Commonwealth newsbook
Clothing the naked woman: writing women's agency in revolutionary England
Gender identities and women's agency in early modern tithe dispute
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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