Catalogue


Absence and memory in colonial American theatre : Fiorelli's plaster /
Odai Johnson.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
description
x, 322 p. : ill., map.
ISBN
1403971005 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
isbn
1403971005 (alk. paper)
standard identifier
9781403971005
catalogue key
5929132
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-12-01:
With this book, Johnson (Univ. of Washington) may well force American theater historians to reexamine their previous assumptions of the early years of the Colonial theater. Most historians have agreed that Puritan and Quaker opposition created an atmosphere that discouraged the development of theatrical practice in the Colonies. This meticulously researched book suggests that Colonial theater activity was far more vibrant than previously recorded. In fact, Johnson argues that the newly arrived British elite's memories of London theaters and theatergoing created an atmosphere that was conducive to the development of Colonial theater. The author sheds new light on the important Colonial theater and theater practitioners, including David Douglass and Lewis Hallam Jr. One of this book's many strengths is Johnson's examination of itinerant theater companies touring the South in the years before the American Revolution. This work serves as an excellent counterbalance to the assumptions Hugh Rankin made in The Theater in Colonial America (CH, Oct'65). Excellent endnotes and bibliography. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. M. D. Whitlatch Buena Vista University
Reviews
Review Quotes
"With "Absence and Memory in Colonial American Theatre," Odai Johnson has written a book that scholars of American Theatre and early American History have been waiting for. He explores histories and lives that have remained largely unknown until this point. Johnson challenges previous misconceptions about the development of the colonial stage, and through meticulous research, helps to fill in numerous gaps in the historical record. Moreover, his imaginative framework and narrative allow the work to transcend a simple historical account of events, offering a creative new paradigm for theatre research."--Heather S. Nathans, University of Maryland"Odai Johnson demonstrates that our historical memories and narratives on American colonial theatre and society have shaped the evidence to tell a distorted story of anti-theatricalism, counter to the far more interesting and complex history that emerges here. With this book, Odai Johnson establishes himself as a theatre historian we all must read."--Thomas Postlewait, Ohio State University
"With Absence and Memory in Colonial American Theatre , Odai Johnson has written a book that scholars of American Theatre and early American History have been waiting for. He explores histories and lives that have remained largely unknown until this point. Johnson challenges previous misconceptions about the development of the colonial stage, and through meticulous research, helps to fill in numerous gaps in the historical record. Moreover, his imaginative framework and narrative allow the work to transcend a simple historical account of events, offering a creative new paradigm for theatre research."--Heather S. Nathans, University of Maryland "Odai Johnson demonstrates that our historical memories and narratives on American colonial theatre and society have shaped the evidence to tell a distorted story of anti-theatricalism, counter to the far more interesting and complex history that emerges here. With this book, Odai Johnson establishes himself as a theatre historian we all must read."--Thomas Postlewait, Ohio State University
"WithAbsence and Memory in Colonial American Theatre, Odai Johnson has written a book that scholars of American Theatre and early American History have been waiting for. He explores histories and lives that have remained largely unknown until this point. Johnson challenges previous misconceptions about the development of the colonial stage, and through meticulous research, helps to fill in numerous gaps in the historical record. Moreover, his imaginative framework and narrative allow the work to transcend a simple historical account of events, offering a creative new paradigm for theatre research."--Heather S. Nathans, University of Maryland "Odai Johnson demonstrates that our historical memories and narratives on American colonial theatre and society have shaped the evidence to tell a distorted story of anti-theatricalism, counter to the far more interesting and complex history that emerges here. With this book, Odai Johnson establishes himself as a theatre historian we all must read."--Thomas Postlewait, Ohio State University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2006
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
This book is a study of how the past has survived--in this case the history of colonial America--considering how the period of roughly 1750-1775 was represented in its own day on stage, and subsequently by the chroniclers of the time.
Long Description
In the case of colonial theater in America, much of what we know about performance has come from the detractors of theater and not its producers: anti-theatrical legislation, sermons, petitions, and prohibitions against the theater, all of which have resulted in a history told as a contest of Puritan and Player. Yet such a narrative hardly accounts for the flourishing theatrical circuit established between 1760 and 1776 (nineteen theatres in seven colonies and the Anglophone Caribbean). This study explores the culture's social support of the theater in the material evidence it left behind as well as the immaterial evidence: the culture's memory of theater, and its enormous desire for it.
Bowker Data Service Summary
In colonial theatre in America, much of what we know about performance has come from the detractors of theatre and not its producers. This study explores the culture's social support of the theatre in the material evidence it left behind, as well as the immaterial evidence: the culture's memory of theatre, and its desire for it.
Table of Contents
(IM)Material Witnesses
Working Up from Post-holes
Mr. Sauthier's Maps
The Anatomy of Desire
The Countenance of Mr. Douglass
Mrs. Warren's Profession
Assuming the Wall -
Care-Takers of Memory
Spoiling Nice Stories
Case Studies
The Burning of the Lena Edwin
Silent Travelers, Silent Journals
The Perfect Storm
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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