Catalogue


Being right is not enough : what progressives must learn from conservative success /
Paul Waldman.
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley & Sons, c2006.
description
v, 266 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
ISBN
0471789607 (cloth), 9780471789604 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley & Sons, c2006.
isbn
0471789607 (cloth)
9780471789604 (cloth)
contents note
Returning fire -- Beyond red and blue -- A progressive country -- Knowing who you are -- Say it like you mean it -- Telling the story -- Manipulating the media for fun and profit -- Thinking big -- Time to get tough -- The progressive moment.
catalogue key
5924334
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 240-256) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
The 2006 elections could be a major turning point for the Democratic Party, but they'll need more than poor poll numbers for Bush to build a new progressive majority. What will it take to break the right wing's stranglehold on power? Can progressives turn the tables by understanding and adapting the highly successful strategies and tactics developed by the right? In Being Right Is Not Enough, political analyst Paul Waldman offers Democrats and progressives a clear-eyed, multifaceted strategy for victory in elections, policy debates, and the fundamental battle between progressivism and conservatism. The time has come, he says, for progressives to borrow several pages from the right-wing playbook and beat them at their own game. The book outlines an exhaustive list of things progressives must do, and do soon, including: Create a single progressive movement--not a collection of interest groups--devoted to the twin goals of fighting conservatism and advancing a progressive worldview Agree on a core set of progressive principles and create a progressive master narrative that unifies them Understand that political success comes not from the details of policy plans but from the communication of character and values Stop pandering to the voters who dislike them the most and find new ways to create a lasting majority Devote themselves not to short-term victories but to a long-term vision of the progressive America they want to create--even if it takes decades to get there Stop worrying about whether the elite media approve of them Stop being timid and become warriors for their cause Waldman provides more than a list of suggestions. He specifies techniques and strategies aimed at increasingthe number of progressive commentators and pundits in the media, identifying strengths and weaknesses that should guide progressive strategies in the future, and defining progressive ideology in terms that all Americans will embrace. Just what the pollster ordered for the Democratic Party, Being Right Is Not Enough provides a hard-hitting, insightful, and pragmatic vision for progressives of every stripe who are tired of losing and ready for victory.
Flap Copy
The 2006 elections could be a major turning point for the Democratic Party, but they'll need more than poor poll numbers for Bush to build a new progressive majority. What will it take to break the right wing's stranglehold on power? Can progressives turn the tables by understanding and adapting the highly successful strategies and tactics developed by the right? In Being Right Is Not Enough, political analyst Paul Waldman offers Democrats and progressives a clear-eyed, multifaceted strategy for victory in elections, policy debates, and the fundamental battle between progressivism and conservatism. The time has come, he says, for progressives to borrow several pages from the right-wing playbook and beat them at their own game. The book outlines an exhaustive list of things progressives must do, and do soon, including: Create a single progressive movement-not a collection of interest groups-devoted to the twin goals of fighting conservatism and advancing a progressive worldview Agree on a core set of progressive principles and create a progressive master narrative that unifies them Understand that political success comes not from the details of policy plans but from the communication of character and values Stop pandering to the voters who dislike them the most and find new ways to create a lasting majority Devote themselves not to short-term victories but to a long-term vision of the progressive America they want to create-even if it takes decades to get there Stop worrying about whether the elite media approve of them Stop being timid and become warriors for their cause Waldman provides more than a list of suggestions. He specifies techniques and strategies aimed at increasing the number of progressive commentators and pundits in the media, identifying strengths and weaknesses that should guide progressive strategies in the future, and defining progressive ideology in terms that all Americans will embrace. Just what the pollster ordered for the Democratic Party, Being Right Is Not Enough provides a hard-hitting, insightful, and pragmatic vision for progressives of every stripe who are tired of losing and ready for victory.
Flap Copy
The 2006 elections could be a major turning point for the Democratic Party, but they2ll need more than poor poll numbers for Bush to build a new progressive majority. What will it take to break the right wing2s stranglehold on power? Can progressives turn the tables by understanding and adapting the highly successful strategies and tactics developed by the right? In Being Right Is Not Enough, political analyst Paul Waldman offers Democrats and progressives a clear-eyed, multifaceted strategy for victory in elections, policy debates, and the fundamental battle between progressivism and conservatism. The time has come, he says, for progressives to borrow several pages from the right-wing playbook and beat them at their own game. The book outlines an exhaustive list of things progressives must do, and do soon, including: Create a single progressive movement-not a collection of interest groups-devoted to the twin goals of fighting conservatism and advancing a progressive worldview Agree on a core set of progressive principles and create a progressive master narrative that unifies them Understand that political success comes not from the details of policy plans but from the communication of character and values Stop pandering to the voters who dislike them the most and find new ways to create a lasting majority Devote themselves not to short-term victories but to a long-term vision of the progressive America they want to create-even if it takes decades to get there Stop worrying about whether the elite media approve of them Stop being timid and become warriors for their cause Waldman provides more than a list of suggestions. He specifies techniques and strategies aimed at increasing the number of progressive commentators and pundits in the media, identifying strengths and weaknesses that should guide progressive strategies in the future, and defining progressive ideology in terms that all Americans will embrace. Just what the pollster ordered for the Democratic Party, Being Right Is Not Enough provides a hard-hitting, insightful, and pragmatic vision for progressives of every stripe who are tired of losing and ready for victory.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2006-02-13:
A senior fellow at Media Matters for America and the former associate director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center, Waldman briefly indulges in matter-of-fact self-blame while lauding the Right for its hard work and cheering on future Democratic activism in this well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation. Let's "inaugurate the age of the progressive warrior," Waldman (Fraud: The Strategy Behind the Bush Lies and Why the Media Didn't Tell You) trumpets, proposing that Democrats take a cue from their opponents in order to do so. He maps out a rhetorical strategy, a "thematically unified master narrative" in answer to the "four pillars of conservatism": low taxes, small government, strong defense and traditional social values. "We're all in it together" is Waldman's progressive answer, a maxim that encompasses five principles: "government that works for everyone, opportunity for everyone, security for everyone, individual freedom for everyone, progress for everyone." Under each principle one can fit any topical issue (e.g., corporate accountability), Waldman explains. He details more grounded, if less conventional, strategies as well: attract moderate voters to the Democratic Party by attacking moderate Republican politicians instead of radical conservatives, and focus on the Southwest instead of the South. Daunted progressives may take heart in Waldman's pragmatic if untested ideas. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2006-05-01:
This book presumes to offer the most comprehensive and cohesive plan yet for Democrats to win back the White House and reclaim majority party status. Waldman (senior fellow, Media Matters for America; Fraud: The Strategy Behind the Bush Lies and Why the Media Didn't Tell You) argues that the problem is not with the party's ideas but with how the ideas are conveyed, viz., the rhetoric employed. He would jettison the word liberal and replace it with progressive, which he expects will give the party an improved public image. Following the example of conservatives, he would have progressives invest heavily in think tanks in order to coin new phrases for their old causes. If all Democrats were to speak consistently from a new "master narrative," for instance, the public would prefer the Democrats' positions to those of the Republicans. If all this sounds too simplistic, it is. Assuming that finding new words or phrases will somehow bridge the divisions within the party is unrealistic. Still, the book has a few interesting ideas, and it's a more balanced approach than the books above. Recommended for larger public libraries or those whose readers are mostly liberals-that is, progressives. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...well-sourced...pragmatic." (Publishers Weekly, February 13, 2006)
A senior fellow at Media Matters for America and the former associate director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center, Waldman briefly indulges in matter-of-fact self-blame while lauding the Right for its hard work and cheering on future Democratic activism in this well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation. Let's "inaugurate the age of the progressive warrior," Waldman (Fraud: The Strategy Behind the Bush Lies and Why the Media Didn't Tell You) trumpets, proposing that Democrats take a cue from their opponents in order to do so. He maps out a rhetorical strategy, a "thematically unified master narrative" in answer to the "four pillars of conservatism": low taxes, small government, strong defense and traditional social values. "We're all in it together" is Waldman's progressive answer, a maxim that encompasses five principles: "government that works for everyone, opportunity for everyone, security for everyone, individual freedom for everyone, progress for everyone." Under each principle one can fit any topical issue (e.g., corporate accountability), Waldman explains. He details more grounded, if less conventional, strategies as well: attract moderate voters to the Democratic Party by attacking moderate Republican politicians instead of radical conservatives, and focus on the Southwest instead of the South. Daunted progressives may take heart in Waldman's pragmatic if untested ideas. (May) (Publishers Weekly, February 13, 2006)
A senior fellow at Media Matters for America and the former associate director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center, Waldman briefly indulges in matter-of-fact self-blame while lauding the Right for its hard work and cheering on future Democratic activism in this well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation. Let's "inaugurate the age of the progressive warrior," Waldman ( Fraud: The Strategy Behind the Bush Lies and Why the Media Didn't Tell You) trumpets, proposing that Democrats take a cue from their opponents in order to do so. He maps out a rhetorical strategy, a "thematically unified master narrative" in answer to the "four pillars of conservatism": low taxes, small government, strong defense and traditional social values. "We're all in it together" is Waldman's progressive answer, a maxim that encompasses five principles: "government that works for everyone, opportunity for everyone, security for everyone, individual freedom for everyone, progress for everyone." Under each principle one can fit any topical issue (e.g., corporate accountability), Waldman explains. He details more grounded, if less conventional, strategies as well: attract moderate voters to the Democratic Party by attacking moderate Republican politicians instead of radical conservatives, and focus on the Southwest instead of the South. Daunted progressives may take heart in Waldman's pragmatic if untested ideas. (May) ( Publishers Weekly, February 13, 2006)
"Waldman's book is terrific-good sense mustered with evidence, well argued and sharply written to boot. I agree fervently with almost everything he writes. This is the indispensable book for the 2006 elections." -Todd Gitlin, bestselling author of The Sixties and The Twilight of Common Dreams "Here's the ticket for Democrats to get back in power: read this book, understand what it means to be a true American progressive, expose conservatives as the mean elitists they are, get tough, and fight back. Nobody paints the strengths of progressives and the weaknesses of conservatives like Paul Waldman." -Bill Press, author How the Republicans Stole Christmas "With clarity and passion, Paul Waldman demonstrates persuasively that the forces of the right have not "taken over the country," as the media often lazily put it. They've only taken over politics. That can be reversed, and Waldman shows exactly how." -Michael Tomasky, Editor, The American Prospect
A senior fellow at Media Matters for America and the former associate director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center, Waldman briefly indulges in matter-of-fact self-blame while lauding the Right for its hard work and cheering on future Democratic activism in this well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation. Let's "inaugurate the age of the progressive warrior," Waldman ("Fraud: The Strategy Behind the Bush Lies and Why the Media Didn't Tell You") trumpets, proposing that Democrats take a cue from their opponents in order to do so. He maps out a rhetorical strategy, a "thematically unified master narrative" in answer to the "four pillars of conservatism": low taxes, small government, strong defense and traditional social values. "We're all in it together" is Waldman's progressive answer, a maxim that encompasses five principles: "government that works for everyone, opportunity for everyone, security for everyone, individual freedom for everyone, progress for everyone." Under each principle one can fit any topical issue (e.g., corporate accountability), Waldman explains. He details more grounded, if less conventional, strategies as well: attract moderate voters to the Democratic Party by attacking moderate Republican politicians instead of radical conservatives, and focus on the Southwest instead of the South. Daunted progressives may take heart in Waldman's pragmatic if untested ideas. "(May)" ("Publishers Weekly," February 13, 2006)
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, February 2006
Library Journal, May 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
The 2006 midterm elections may be the most hotly contested midterm election in decades, and the Democrats are hoping to win big. But they can't do it without a coherent strategy. Now, a much needed architect has arrived in Paul Waldman, as he gives progressives, at last, the clear-eyed, multi-facted plan they need for victory. Like conservatives since Barry Goldwater's defeat, he argues, progressives need to start planning for long-term success, and they need for starter's, to come up with a way to describe their worldview in a single sentence. Offering a host of specific advice and recommendations-how Democratic candidates must be strong as well as right, and why Democrats should forget the South and embrace the Southwest-this book may well be the landmark game plan for progressives that The Emerging Republican Majority was for the Goldwater/Reagan Republicans.
Back Cover Copy
"Waldman's book is terrific-good sense mustered with evidence, well argued, and sharply written to boot. I agree fervently with almost everything he writes. This is the indispensable book for the 2006 elections." -Todd Gitlin, author of The Sixties and The Twilight of Common Dreams "A well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation." -Publishers Weekly "Here's the ticket for Democrats to get back in power: read this book, understand what it means to be a true American progressive, expose conservatives as the mean elitists they are, get tough, and fight back. Nobody paints the strengths of progressives and the weaknesses of conservatives like Paul Waldman." -Bill Press, author How the Republicans Stole Christmas "With clarity and passion, Paul Waldman demonstrates persuasively that the forces of the right have not 'taken over the country,' as the media often lazily put it. They've only taken over politics. That can be reversed, and Waldman shows exactly how." -Michael Tomasky, Editor, the American Prospect
Back Cover Copy
"Waldman's book is terrific-good sense mustered with evidence, well argued, and sharply written to boot. I agree fervently with almost everything he writes. This is the indispensable book for the 2006 elections." --Todd Gitlin, author of "The Sixties and The Twilight of Common Dreams" "A well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation." --"Publishers Weekly" "Here's the ticket for Democrats to get back in power: read this book, understand what it means to be a true American progressive, expose conservatives as the mean elitists they are, get tough, and fight back. Nobody paints the strengths of progressives and the weaknesses of conservatives like Paul Waldman." --Bill Press, author "How the Republicans Stole Christmas" "With clarity and passion, Paul Waldman demonstrates persuasively that the forces of the right have not 'taken over the country, ' as the media often lazily put it. They've only taken over politics. That can be reversed, and Waldman shows exactly how." --Michael Tomasky, Editor, the "American Prospect"
Back Cover Copy
"Waldman's book is terrific-good sense mustered with evidence, well argued, and sharply written to boot. I agree fervently with almost everything he writes. This is the indispensable book for the 2006 elections." -Todd Gitlin, author of The Sixties and The Twilight of Common Dreams "A well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation." - Publishers Weekly "Here's the ticket for Democrats to get back in power: read this book, understand what it means to be a true American progressive, expose conservatives as the mean elitists they are, get tough, and fight back. Nobody paints the strengths of progressives and the weaknesses of conservatives like Paul Waldman." -Bill Press, author How the Republicans Stole Christmas "With clarity and passion, Paul Waldman demonstrates persuasively that the forces of the right have not 'taken over the country,' as the media often lazily put it. They've only taken over politics. That can be reversed, and Waldman shows exactly how." -Michael Tomasky, Editor, the American Prospect
Main Description
"Waldman's book is terrificgood sense mustered with evidence, well argued, and sharply written to boot. I agree fervently with almost everything he writes. This is the indispensable book for the 2006 elections." Todd Gitlin, author of The Sixties and The Twilight of Common Dreams"A well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation." Publishers Weekly"Here's the ticket for Democrats to get back in power: read this book, understand what it means to be a true American progressive, expose conservatives as the mean elitists they are, get tough, and fight back. Nobody paints the strengths of progressives and the weaknesses of conservatives like Paul Waldman." Bill Press, author How the Republicans Stole Christmas"With clarity and passion, Paul Waldman demonstrates persuasively that the forces of the right have not 'taken over the country,' as the media often lazily put it. They've only taken over politics. That can be reversed, and Waldman shows exactly how." Michael Tomasky, Editor, the American Prospect
Main Description
"Waldman's book is terrific-good sense mustered with evidence, well argued, and sharply written to boot. I agree fervently with almost everything he writes. This is the indispensable book for the 2006 elections." --Todd Gitlin, author of The Sixties and The Twilight of Common Dreams "A well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation." --Publishers Weekly "Here's the ticket for Democrats to get back in power: read this book, understand what it means to be a true American progressive, expose conservatives as the mean elitists they are, get tough, and fight back. Nobody paints the strengths of progressives and the weaknesses of conservatives like Paul Waldman." --Bill Press, author How the Republicans Stole Christmas "With clarity and passion, Paul Waldman demonstrates persuasively that the forces of the right have not 'taken over the country,' as the media often lazily put it. They've only taken over politics. That can be reversed, and Waldman shows exactly how." --Michael Tomasky, Editor, the American Prospect
Main Description
The 2006 midterm elections may be the most hotly contested in decades, and the Democrats are hoping to win big. But they can't do it without a coherent strategy. Now, a much needed architect has arrived in Paul Waldman, who at last gives progressives the clear-eyed, multifaceted plan they need for victory. Like conservatives since Barry Goldwater's defeat, he argues, progressives need to start planning for long-term success, and they need for starters, to come up with a way to describe their worldview in a single sentence. Offering a host of specific advice and recommendations-how Democratic candidates must be strong as well as right, and why Democrats should forget the South and embrace the Southwest-this book may well be the landmark game plan for progressives that The Emerging Republican Majority was for the Goldwater/Reagan Republicans.Paul Waldman (Washington, DC) is a Senior Fellow at Media Matters for America and the former associate director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center. His books include Fraud: The Strategy Behind the Bush Lies and Why the Media Didn't Tell You (1-4022-0252-0).
Long Description
"Waldman2s book is terrific-good sense mustered with evidence, well argued, and sharply written to boot. I agree fervently with almost everything he writes. This is the indispensable book for the 2006 elections." -Todd Gitlin, author of The Sixties and The Twilight of Common Dreams "A well-sourced, partisan blueprint for undoing Republican control of the nation." -Publishers Weekly "Here2s the ticket for Democrats to get back in power: read this book, understand what it means to be a true American progressive, expose conservatives as the mean elitists they are, get tough, and fight back. Nobody paints the strengths of progressives and the weaknesses of conservatives like Paul Waldman." -Bill Press, author How the Republicans Stole Christmas "With clarity and passion, Paul Waldman demonstrates persuasively that the forces of the right have not 2taken over the country,2 as the media often lazily put it. They2ve only taken over politics. That can be reversed, and Waldman shows exactly how." -Michael Tomasky, Editor, the American Prospect
Long Description
The 2006 midterm elections may be the most hotly contested in decades, and the Democrats are hoping to win big. But they can' t do it without a coherent strategy. Now, a much needed architect has arrived in Paul Waldman, who at last gives progressives the clear-eyed, multifaceted plan they need for victory. Like conservatives since Barry Goldwater' s defeat, he argues, progressives need to start planning for long-term success, and they need for starters, to come up with a way to describe their worldview in a single sentence. Offering a host of specific advice and recommendations- how Democratic candidates must be strong as well as right, and why Democrats should forget the South and embrace the Southwest- this book may well be the landmark game plan for progressives that The Emerging Republican Majority was for the Goldwater/Reagan Republicans. Paul Waldman (Washington, DC) is a Senior Fellow at Media Matters for America and the former associate director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center. His books include Fraud: The Strategy Behind the Bush Lies and Why the Media Didn' t Tell You (1-4022-0252-0).
Table of Contents
Returning Firep. 1
Beyond Red and Bluep. 29
A Progressive Countryp. 59
Knowing Who You Arep. 86
Say It Like You Mean Itp. 110
Telling the Storyp. 139
Manipulating the Media for Fun and Profitp. 168
Thinking Bigp. 195
Time to Get Toughp. 216
The Progressive Momentp. 234
Acknowledgmentsp. 239
Notesp. 240
Indexp. 257
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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