Catalogue


Garage rock and its roots : musical rebels and the drive for individuality /
Eric James Abbey.
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Company, 2006.
description
ix, 213 p.
ISBN
0786425644 (softcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Jefferson, N.C. : McFarland & Company, 2006.
isbn
0786425644 (softcover : alk. paper)
abstract
"This study explores garage rock as it evolved alongside mainstream music and examines how it reflects notions of self through the assertion of individuality and rebellion. Section one examines the creation of the scene, the importance of relationships to the past and the appearance used throughout. Section two analyzes the alliances and relationships to society"--Provided by publisher.
catalogue key
5917866
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-04-01:
Since popular songs convey the deepest held convictions of a nation and a people at a given time, the best work on popular music carefully examines the substance and significance to both the time in which the music was created and its echo into the present. Abbey's book on Detroit's garage-rock movement is not such a work but instead a quagmire of little use. Skipping back and forth between 1990s Michigan and the 1960s "British invasion" without any real connection, the narrative soon becomes a tedious list of recordings without any common frame of reference. The book's most egregious flaw is that it fails to address the question most relevant to historical work--"So what?" Abbey (Oakland Community college) fully explains the local significance of the garage-rock movement but pays almost no attention to the movement's lasting impact on the music business (American or worldwide) as a whole. Also unexplored: why did these artists feel the need to avoid the music conglomerates in order to maintain their integrity? A compilation CD of the salient works would have given the inexperienced reader an idea of what Abbey was analyzing. Without it, the book becomes a complex symphony played with gusto to an empty hall. ^BSumming Up: Not recommended. M. J. C. Taylor Dickinson State University
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2006
Choice, April 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
When British rockers invaded the United States in the 1960s, youths responded by growing long hair and playing electrified music in suburban garages. Garage rock has grown from a hobby of the rebellious to a cultural statement: anything not mainstream, from alternative country to hardcore punk, can be included in the realm of contemporary garage rock. Issues of rebellion, clothing and hair styles, playing styles, nostalgia and ?selling out? permeate the modern culture of garage rock. Pure rock from the ?50s, ?60s and ?70s and older root styles such as swing and rockabilly have been reasserted in this form, leaving the confines of garages for clubs and other venues where fans' tastes are tuned to the underground. This study explores garage rock as it evolved alongside mainstream music and examines how it reflects notions of self though the assertion of individuality and rebellion in prosperous postmodern times. Using the Detroit music scene as the focus, the author presents two sections. The first section examines the creation of the scene, the importance of relationships to the past and the appearance used throughout. The second section analyzes the alliances and relationships to society that undergird contemporary garage rock. The author maintains garage rock has developed a place in American cultural history, and its continuation will be based on how the underground situates itself within postmodern society.
Long Description
When British rockers invaded the United States in the 1960s, youths responded by playing electrified music in garages. Garage rock has grown from a hobby of the rebellious to a cultural statement: anything not mainstream, from alternative country to hardcore punk, can be included. This study explores garage rock as it evolved alongside mainstream music and examines how it reflects notions of self though the assertion of individuality and rebellion in prosperous postmodern times. Using the Detroit music scene as the focus, the author presents two sections. The first section examines the creation of the scene, the importance of relationships to the past and the appearance used throughout. The second section analyzes the alliances and relationships to society that undergird contemporary garage rock. The author maintains garage rock has developed a place in American cultural history, and its continuation will be based on how the underground situates itself within postmodern society.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vii
Introductionp. 1
Foundations
Made in Detroit: How an Underground Movement Restructured the Pastp. 15
Setting Your Sights on the Undergroundp. 34
Invasion of the Britishp. 51
The Count Who?p. 69
You're Going to Wear That?p. 87
What Is Garage Rock?p. 102
Implications
Mainstreaming the Undergroundp. 121
Nostalgic Benefitsp. 137
Removing the Constraint: The Confines of Late Capitalismp. 152
The Break Into Individualismp. 167
This Will Wake the Neighbors!p. 185
Chapter Notesp. 201
Bibliographyp. 205
Indexp. 209
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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