Catalogue


Women teaching, women learning : historical perspectives /
Elizabeth M. Smyth and Paula Bourne, editors.
imprint
Toronto : Inanna Publications and Education, c2006.
description
236 p. : ports. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0973670932 (pbk.) :
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Toronto : Inanna Publications and Education, c2006.
isbn
0973670932 (pbk.) :
catalogue key
5916084
 
Includes bibliographical references.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
Women Teaching Women Learning: Historical Perspectives is a collection of essays building on the work of Canadian feminist historian Alison Prentice. Drawn from Canada, Australia, and Sweden, the contributors represent an array of researchers whose work has been influenced by that of Prentice. The ten essays explore aspects of women's formal and informal education in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The subjects are women who teach and learn in traditional institutional-based settings as well as in informal learning networks that arose from travel and involvement in social activism. The authors write in a variety of styles and utilize a variety of methodologies, including oral history and document and text analysis, in order to focus on the complex interplay of women and education-with education broadly conceptualized as occurring at home, at school, and in the community. Book jacket.
Main Description
Women Teaching, Women Learning: Historical Perspectives is a collection of essays exploring aspects of women's formal and informal education in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The subjects of the essays are women who teach and learn in such traditional institutional-based settings as schools and universities as well as in informal learning networks that arose from travel and involvement in social activism. The authors write in a variety of styles in order to focus on the complex interplay of women and education with education broadly conceptualized as occurring at home, at school, and in the community.
Main Description
Cultural Writing. Education. Women's Studies. WOMEN TEACHING, WOMEN LEARNING: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES is a collection of essays inspired by the pioneering work of Canadian feminist historian, Alison Prentice, that explores aspects of women's formal and informal education in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The subjects of the essays are women who teach and learn in such traditional institutional-based settings as schools and universities as well as in informal learning networks that arose from travel and involvement in social activism. The authors write in a variety of styles with education broadly conceptualized as occurring at home, at school, and in the community.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. 9
Introductionp. 11
The Lives of Women Teachers
Getting Things Done: Donalda J. Dickie and Leadership Through Practicep. 23
Sustaining the Fire of "Scholarly Passion": Mary G. Hamilton (1883-1972) and Irene Poelzer (1926-)p. 45
And Gladly Teach? The Making of a Woman's Professionp. 65
Cecilia Fryxell: The Life of a Swedish Educatorp. 85
Regulating Women: Social Work, Teaching and Medicine
A Passion for Service: Edith Elwood and the Social Character of Reformp. 105
Gender and Class: State Formation and Schooling Reform in 1880s Torontop. 131
"All Matter Peculiar to Woman and Womanhood": The Medical Context for Women's Education in Canada in the First Half of the Twentieth Centuiryp. 158
Women's Public and Private Lives
Travel Lessons: Canadian Women "Across the Pond" 1865-1905p. 177
"Giving Myself a Toni, Write Thesis Tonight": Negotiating Higher Education in the 1950sp. 195
The Ideology of Domesticity: Re-constructions Across Three Generations in Ontariop. 213
Contributor Notesp. 232
List of Illustrationsp. 235
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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