Catalogue


Cognition, aging, and self-reports /
edited by Norbert Schwarz ... [et al.].
imprint
Philadelphia, PA : Psychology Press, c1999.
description
xvii, 407 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1560327804 (hardcover : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Philadelphia, PA : Psychology Press, c1999.
isbn
1560327804 (hardcover : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5914000
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
This book provides a state-of-the-art overview of age-related changes in cognitive functioning and explores the implications of these changes for the self-report of attitudes and behaviors. The contributors are leading researchers in cognitive aging and survey methodology, and chapters are written to be accessible to non-specialists. The first part of the book provides an authoritative review of the current state of cognitive aging research, covering topics such as working memory, inhibition, autobiographical memory, metacognition, and attention. A second section examines the unique issues associated with aging, language comprehension and interpersonal communication, while the final section reviews researcher into age-related differences in survey responding. Of particular interest is how age-related changes in cognitive and communicative functioning influence the question-answering process in research situations. Experimental research illustrates that older and younger respondents are differentiallyaffected by question order, question wording and other features of questionnaire design. As a result, many age-related differences in reported attitudes and behaviors may reflect age-related differences in the response process rather than differences in respondents' actual attitudes or behaviors. Implications for research design and psychological theorizing are addressed, and practical solutions are offered. As such, the book will be of interest not only to those in the fields of cognitive aging and gerontology, but also to survey methodologists and researchers in public opinion, marketing, and related fields, who rely on respondents' answers to questions in their research.
Back Cover Copy
This book provides a state-of-the-art overview of age-related changes in cognitive functioning and explores the implications of these changes for the self-report of attitudes and behaviors. The contributors are leading researchers in cognitive aging and survey methodology, and chapters are written to be accessible to non-specialists. The first part of the book provides an authoritative review of the current state of cognitive aging research, covering topics such as working memory, inhibition, autobiographical memory, metacognition, and attention. A second section examines the unique issues associated with aging, language comprehension and interpersonal communication, while the final section reviews researcher into age-related differences in survey responding. Of particular interest is how age-related changes in cognitive and communicative functioning influence the question-answering process in research situations. Experimental research illustrates that older and younger respondents are differentially affected by question order, question wording and other features of questionnaire design. As a result, many age-related differences in reported attitudes and behaviors may reflect age-related differences in the response process rather than differences in respondents' actual attitudes or behaviors. Implications for research design and psychological theorizing are addressed, and practical solutions are offered. As such, the book will be of interest not only to those in the fields of cognitive aging and gerontology, but also to survey methodologists and researchers in public opinion, marketing, and related fields, who rely on respondents' answers to questions in their research.
Unpaid Annotation
This book provides a state-of-the-art overview of age-related changes in cognitive functioning & explores the implications of these changes for the self-report of attitudes & behaviors. The contributors are leading researchers in cognitive aging & survey methodology, & chapters are written to be accessible to non-specialists. Of particular interest is how age-related changes in cognitive & communicative functioning influence the question-answering process in research situations. Experimental research illustrates that older & younger respondents are differentially affected by question order, question wording & other features of questionnaire design. As a result, many age-related differences in reported attitudes & behaviors may reflect age-related differences in the response process rather than differences in respondents' actual attitudes or behaviors. Implications for research design & psychological theorizing are addressed, & practical solutions are offered. As such, the book will be of interest not only to those in the fields of cognitive aging & gerontology, but also to survey methodologists & researchers in public opinion, marketing, & related fields, who rely on respondents' answers to questions in their research.
Back Cover Copy
This text provides an overview of age-related changes in cognitive functioning and explores the implications of these changes for the self- report of attitudes and behaviours. The contributors are researchers in cognitive ageing and survey methodology, and chapters are written to be accessible to non-specialists. The first part of the book provides a review of late 1990s cognitive ageing research, covering topics such as working memory, inhibition, autobiographical memory, metacognition and attention. A second section examines issues associated with ageing, language comprehension and interpersonal communication, while the final reviews research into age-related differences in survey responding.; Of particular interest is how age-related changes in cognitive and communiticative functioning influence the question-answering process in research situations. Experimental research illustrates that older and younger respondents are differentially affected by question order, question wording and other features of questionnaire design. As a result, many age-related differences in reported attitudes and behaviours may reflect age-related differences in the response process rather than differences in respondents' actual attitudes or behaviours. Implications for research design and psychological theorizing are addressed, and practical solutions are offered. As such, the book should be of interest not only to those in the fields of cognitive ageing and gerontology, but also to survey methodologists and researchers in public opinion, marketing, and related fields, who rely on respondents' answers to questions in their research.
Table of Contents
Contributors
Acknowledgments
Cognition, Aging, and Self-Reports: Editors' Introductionp. 1
Self-Reports of Behaviors and Opinions: Cognitive and Communicative Processesp. 17
Cognitive Aging, Processing Resources, and Self-Reportp. 45
The Concept of Gains in Cognitive Agingp. 71
Memory, Aging, and Survey Measurementp. 95
Aging, Circadian Arousal Patterns, and Cognitionp. 117
Metamemory as Social Cognition: Challenges for (and from) Survey Researchp. 145
Autobiographical Memory and Aging: Distributions of Memories Across the Life-Span and Their Implications for Survey Researchp. 163
Pressing Issues in Cognitive Agingp. 185
Comprehending Spoken Questions: Effects of Cognitive and Sensory Change in Adult Agingp. 201
Aging and Message Production and Comprehensionp. 229
Intergenerational Communication: The Survey Interview as a Social Exchangep. 245
Asking Survey Respondents About Health Status: Judgment and Response Issuesp. 265
Cognitive Testing of Cognitive Functioning Questionsp. 285
Dynamics of Survey Interviewing and the Quality of Survey Reports: Age Comparisonsp. 303
Cognitive Performance Measures in Survey Research on Older Adultsp. 327
Age Differences in Question and Response Order Effectsp. 341
Aging and Errors of Measurement: Implications for the Study of Life-Span Developmentp. 365
Indexp. 387
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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