Catalogue


Time's purpled masquers : stars and the afterlife in Renaissance English literature /
Alastair Fowler.
imprint
New York : Clarendon Press, 1996.
description
171 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
0198183402
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Clarendon Press, 1996.
isbn
0198183402
catalogue key
591352
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [129]-163) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
"...Fowler has served students of religion well. The transformations of social and symbolic systems during the period in question are multifaceted. Fowler has drawn attention to one more aspect of which students of religion may be unaware."--Sixteenth Century Journal "...offers an elegant and striking examination of the old belief in an afterlife in the stars and a brief, rather tour de force survey of astronomical thinking in the Renaissance..."--Chronique
"...Fowler has served students of religion well. The transformations of social and symbolic systems during the period in question are multifaceted. Fowler has drawn attention to one more aspect of which students of religion may be unaware."-- Sixteenth Century Journal "...offers an elegant and striking examination of the old belief in an afterlife in the stars and a brief, rather tour de force survey of astronomical thinking in the Renaissance..."-- Chronique
"...Fowler has served students of religion well. The transformations of social and symbolic systems during the period in question are multifaceted. Fowler has drawn attention to one more aspect of which students of religion may be unaware."--Sixteenth Century Journal "...offers an elegant and striking examination of the old belief in an afterlife in the stars and a brief, rathertour de forcesurvey of astronomical thinking in the Renaissance..."--Chronique
...the book (modestly termed 'no more than an essay') is a major work, stunningly learned in art history, wonderfully subtle in literary analysis, and truly communal, drawing on a rich array of recent secondary work.
'The primary merit of Time's Purpled Masquers... is its conceptualization - and concise, often illuminating, discussion - of a topic that has either been insufficiently addressed or overlooked entirely in more ambitious studies of early modern science, art and iconography, and literature andcultural history.'Seventeenth-Century News
'This slender but highly compressed volume is a veritable cornucopia, replete with references to an astonishing number of related studies ... the new volume is a generally reliable guide to the little early modern science it needs.'Times Literary Supplement
'This slender but highly compressed volume is a veritable cornucopia, replete with references to an astonishing number of related studies ... the new volume is a generally reliable guide to the little early modern science it needs.'Times Literary Supplement'The primary merit of Time's Purpled Masquers... is its conceptualization - and concise, often illuminating, discussion - of a topic that has either been insufficiently addressed or overlooked entirely in more ambitious studies of early modern science, art and iconography, and literature and cultural history.'Seventeenth-Century News
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Summaries
Long Description
Alastair Fowler's fascinating study explores the extraordinary prominence of astronomical imagery in Renaissance literature. Although the stars were important astrologically, this is at best a partial explanation for the popularity of such imagery, and the impact of astronomical discoveries (particularly their implications for stellification, or translation to the stars) is also an important factor. Seventeenth-century culture was both religious and materialistic and the literature of the period shows a great variety of negotiated reconciliations of the two.
Main Description
Alastair Fowler's fascinating study explores the extraordinary prominence of astronomical imagery in Renaissance literature. Although the stars were important astrologically, this is at best a partial explanation for the popularity of such imagery, and the impact of astronomical discoveries(particularly their implications for stellification, or translation to the stars) is also an important factor. Seventeenth-century culture was both religious and materialistic and the literature of the period shows a great variety of negotiated reconciliations of the two.
Main Description
Alastair Fowler's fascinating study explores the extraordinary prominence of astronomical imagery in Renaissance literature. He describes the forgotten Renaissance beliefs about stellification, an afterlife in the stars through metamorphosis into stellar or angelic substance. The newastronomy of Copernicus and Brahe, far from working against religious beliefs, encouraged hopes of access to the uncorrupted spheres. Fowler's many-faceted book scrutinizes these ideas--both sacred and scientific--as they manifested in literature, masques, architecture, and the pursuit offame.
Main Description
Alastair Fowler's fascinating study explores the extraordinary prominence of astronomical imagery in Renaissance literature. He describes the forgotten Renaissance beliefs about stellification, an afterlife in the stars through metamorphosis into stellar or angelic substance. The new astronomy of Copernicus and Brahe, far from working against religious beliefs, encouraged hopes of access to the uncorrupted spheres. Fowler's many-faceted book scrutinizes these ideas--both sacred and scientific--as they manifested in literature, masques, architecture, and the pursuit of fame.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. vii
Introductionp. 1
Histories of Heavenp. 33
Stellar Afterlivesp. 59
Trumpets and Asterismsp. 87
Obelisks and Pyramidsp. 107
Referencesp. 129
Indexp. 165
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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