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William Lowndes Yancey and the coming of the Civil War /
Eric H. Walther.
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2006.
description
xi, 477 p.
ISBN
0807830275 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780807830277 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, c2006.
isbn
0807830275 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780807830277 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Introduction -- Jordan's stormy banks -- Rebellion and Union -- Flush times and bad times in Alabama and South Carolina -- Politician -- Party and honor -- The Alabama platform -- Secessionist -- Creating the "leaven of disunion" -- Public man, private life -- Yancey and the house divided -- Walker and Walker, the league and the letter -- The conventions of 1860 -- The voice of the South -- The men and the hours -- In King Arthur's court -- Journeys home -- The main pillar of the Confederacy.
catalogue key
5912338
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
In the first comprehensive biography of William Lowndes Yancey (1814-63), one of the leading secessionists of the Old South, Eric H. Walther examines the personality and political life of the uncompromising fire-eater and presents a nuanced look at the roots of Southern honor, violence, and understandings of manhood as they developed in the nineteenth century.
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-12-01:
In this valuable biography of Yancey, a leader of the Southern movement of secession from the Union, Walther (Univ. of Houston) provides a better understanding of how strongly some political leaders from the Old South felt about States' Rights, the Union, and slavery from the 1830s until the Civil War. For Yancey, "the great menace in 1855" was neither the new Republican Party of the North nor Kansas, but the success of the American Party, the Know-Nothing party that replaced the Whig Party in some southern states, including Yancey's Alabama. The Know-Nothings challenged Alabama Democrats and signaled a growing evil and intolerance across the nation. Yancey opposed them because they advocated the maintenance of the Union as "the paramount political good." They were the latest manifestation of Federalism. Yancey believed that life in the South was proper and good. Using a biblical phrase long before Abe Lincoln, he declared, "A house divided against itself cannot stand." A worthwhile and well-researched addition serving libraries interested in the history of the South and the coming of the Civil War. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. General collections and upper-division undergraduates and above. H. M. Druks City University of New York Brooklyn College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A major contribution . . . which will be of great interest to students of the Old South and the Civil War." _ North Carolina Historical Review
"A major contribution . . . which will be of great interest to students of the Old South and the Civil War." -- North Carolina Historical Review
"A major contribution . . . which will be of great interest to students of the Old South and the Civil War." --North Carolina Historical Review
"An admirable biography of a less than admirable man. . . . Thoroughly researched and skillfully argued, this book is a major contribution to our understanding of antebellum American politics and the coming of the Civil War. . . . Walther has written a superb book, an often-disturbing exploration of a politics of anger and fear. It is a book that no one interested in American history should ignore." _ Alabama Review
"An admirable biography of a less than admirable man. . . . Thoroughly researched and skillfully argued, this book is a major contribution to our understanding of antebellum American politics and the coming of the Civil War. . . . Walther has written a superb book, an often-disturbing exploration of a politics of anger and fear. It is a book that no one interested in American history should ignore." -- Alabama Review
"An admirable biography of a less than admirable man. . . . Thoroughly researched and skillfully argued, this book is a major contribution to our understanding of antebellum American politics and the coming of the Civil War. . . . Walther has written a superb book, an often-disturbing exploration of a politics of anger and fear. It is a book that no one interested in American history should ignore."--Alabama Review
"Gives historians their first close look at this straw man of secession. . . . The research is in impressive. . . . Scholars will thank Walther for finally giving them a full portrait of this intriguing figure." _ The Historian
"Gives historians their first close look at this straw man of secession. . . . The research is in impressive. . . . Scholars will thank Walther for finally giving them a full portrait of this intriguing figure." -- The Historian
"Gives historians their first close look at this straw man of secession. . . . The research is in impressive. . . . Scholars will thank Walther for finally giving them a full portrait of this intriguing figure." --The Historian
"Until now . . . 'the prince of Fire-eaters' has lacked a modern biography." _ Civil War History
"Until now . . . 'the prince of Fire-eaters' has lacked a modern biography." -- Civil War History
"Until now . . . 'the prince of Fire-eaters' has lacked a modern biography." --Civil War History
"Walther has not only exhaustively explored the sources for Yancey's life, but he has written a careful and judicious biography of a man known for his fiery words and actions in the nation's greatest crisis." _ South Carolina Historical Magazine
"Walther has not only exhaustively explored the sources for Yancey's life, but he has written a careful and judicious biography of a man known for his fiery words and actions in the nation's greatest crisis." -- South Carolina Historical Magazine
"Walther has not only exhaustively explored the sources for Yancey's life, but he has written a careful and judicious biography of a man known for his fiery words and actions in the nation's greatest crisis." --South Carolina Historical Magazine
"Whether or not Yancey was a man obsessed, this biography should be a book possessed." -- Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"Whether or not Yancey was a man obsessed, this biography should be a book possessed." --Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
"Whether or not Yancey was a man obsessed, this biography should be a book possessed." '”Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
This item was reviewed in:
Wall Street Journal, July 2006
Choice, December 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
William Lowndes Yancey (1814-63) was one of the leading secessionists of the Old South. This biography examines his personality and political life. Born in Georgia but raised in the North by a fiercely abolitionist stepfather, Yancey grew up believing that abolitionists were cruel, meddling, and hypocritical.
Main Description
In the first comprehensive biography of William Lowndes Yancey (1814-63), one of the leading secessionists of the Old South, Eric H. Walther examines the personality and political life of the uncompromising fire-eater. Born in Georgia but raised in the North by a fiercely abolitionist stepfather and an emotionally unstable mother, Yancey grew up believing that abolitionists were cruel, meddling, and hypocritical. His personal journey led him through a series of mentors who transformed his political views, and upon moving to frontier Alabama in his twenties, Yancey's penchant for rhetorical and physical violence was soon channeled into a crusade to protect slaveholders' rights. Yancey defied Northern Democrats at their national nominating convention in 1860, rending the party and setting the stage for secession after the election of Abraham Lincoln. Selected to introduce Jefferson Davis in Montgomery as the president-elect of the Confederacy, Yancey also served the Confederacy as a diplomat and a senator before his death in 1863, just short of his forty-ninth birthday. More than a portrait of an influential political figure before and during the Civil War, this study also presents a nuanced look at the roots of Southern honor, violence, and understandings of manhood as they developed in the nineteenth century.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
Jordan's Stormy Banksp. 4
Rebellion and Unionp. 18
Flush Times and Bad Times in Alabama and South Carolinap. 38
Politicianp. 56
Party and Honorp. 74
The Alabama Platformp. 92
Secessionistp. 113
Creating the "Leaven of Disunion"p. 128
Public Man, Private Lifep. 145
Yancey and the House Dividedp. 179
Walker and Walker, the League and the Letterp. 203
The Conventions of 1860p. 229
The Voice of the Southp. 253
The Men and the Hoursp. 274
In King Arthur's Courtp. 296
Journeys Homep. 322
The Main Pillar of the Confederacyp. 342
Legacyp. 369
Notesp. 377
Bibliographyp. 435
Indexp. 461
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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