Catalogue


Polarized America : the dance of ideology and unequal riches /
Nolan McCarty, Keith T. Poole, and Howard Rosenthal.
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 2006.
description
xii, 240 p. : ill.
ISBN
0262134640 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, 2006.
isbn
0262134640 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5908897
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-02-01:
McCarty, Poole, and Rosenthal have written a book of unusually large empirical scope that explains many central characteristics of contemporary American politics. The authors chart increasing partisan polarization in Congress and increased income disparity in recent decades. How are these changes linked? The two parties' agendas have dramatically diverged as income inequality has risen. In Congress, the GOP has become more conservative and Democrats more liberal, leading to lower levels of legislative productivity, as majority agreements are harder to achieve. Employing sophisticated quantitative analysis, the authors note a recent move away from redistributive policies by the national government, in part fueled by rising real incomes since 1960 that translated into greater GOP strength. Noting that partisan polarization and economic inequality "have proven to be durable features of our political economy for almost three decades," the authors argue that "reordering the system will require major changes in the loyalties of various groups to the political parties." That, they argue, will happen slowly, if at all. This book is essential reading for all students of American politics. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. S. E. Schier Carleton College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"A breath of fresh air.... A book that will guide and inform the study of polarization for years to come." Jeffrey A. Jenkins Chicago Tribune
--David W. Brady, Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science and Leadership Values, Stanford University
"Important.... Essential reading for anyone who wants to understand what's happening to America." Paul Krugman New York Times
"In this impressive book, McCarty, Poole, and Rosenthal break through the wall political scientists have inadvertently constructed between American political institutions and American society. Their findings concerning the links between mounting inequality, immigration, and the rise of political polarization are sure to generate much discussion. Their fine scholarship will enlighten that discussion as well." --Paul Pierson, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
--Paul Pierson, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
"In this impressive book, McCarty, Poole, and Rosenthal break through the wall political scientists have inadvertently constructed between American political institutions and American society. Their findings concerning the links between mounting inequality, immigration, and the rise of political polarization are sure to generate much discussion. Their fine scholarship will enlighten that discussion as well." - Paul Pierson , Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
"In this impressive book, McCarty, Poole, and Rosenthal break through the wall political scientists have inadvertently constructed between American political institutions and American society. Their findings concerning the links between mounting inequality, immigration, and the rise of political polarization are sure to generate much discussion. Their fine scholarship will enlighten that discussion as well." -Paul Pierson, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
"The topic of polarization-its causes and consequences-has risen to the front of the study of American politics. Nolan McCarty and his coauthors have written the gold standard against which others will be judged. Their analysis of the consequences of polarization has caused me to rethink my belief that there are no real policy consequences to the elite polarization of American politics." - David W. Brady , Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science and Leadership Values, Stanford University
"The topic of polarization-its causes and consequences-has risen to the front of the study of American politics. Nolan McCarty and his coauthors have written the gold standard against which others will be judged. Their analysis of the consequences of polarization has caused me to rethink my belief that there are no real policy consequences to the elite polarization of American politics." -David W. Brady, Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science and Leadership Values, Stanford University
"In this impressive book, McCarty, Poole, and Rosenthal break through the wall political scientists have inadvertently constructed between American political institutions and American society. Their findings concerning the links between mounting inequality, immigration, and the rise of political polarization are sure to generate much discussion. Their fine scholarship will enlighten that discussion as well."--Paul Pierson, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
"The topic of polarization -- its causes and consequences -- has risen to the front of the study of American politics. Nolan McCarty and his coauthors have written the gold standard against which others will be judged. Their analysis of the consequences of polarization has caused me to rethink my belief that there are no real policy consequences to the elite polarization of American politics."--David W. Brady, Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science and Leadership Values, Stanford University
"The topic of polarizationits causes and consequenceshas risen to the front of the study of American politics. Nolan McCarty and his coauthors have written the gold standard against which others will be judged. Their analysis of the consequences of polarization has caused me to rethink my belief that there are no real policy consequences to the elite polarization of American politics." David W. Brady , Bowen H. and Janice Arthur McCoy Professor of Political Science and Leadership Values, Stanford University
This item was reviewed in:
Chicago Tribune, August 2006
Choice, February 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Analysing how the increasing polarisation of American politics has been accompanied and accelerated by greater income inequality, rising immigration, and other social and economic changes, this book examines this relationship, characterising it as a dance of give and take and back and forth causality.
Long Description
The idea of America as politically polarized--that there is an unbridgeable divide between right and left, red and blue states--has become a cliche. What commentators miss, however, is that increasing polarization in recent decades has been closely accompanied by fundamental social and economic changes--most notably, a parallel rise in income inequality. In "Polarized America," Nolan McCarty, Keith Poole, and Howard Rosenthal examine the relationships of polarization, wealth disparity, immigration, and other forces, characterizing it as a dance of give and take and back and forth causality. Using NOMINATE (a quantitative procedure that, like interest group ratings, scores politicians on the basis of their roll call voting records) to measure polarization in Congress and public opinion, census data and Federal Election Commission finance records to measure polarization among the public, the authors find that polarization and income inequality fell in tandem from 1913 to 1957 and rose together dramatically from 1977 on; they trace a parallel rise in immigration beginning in the 1970s. They show that Republicans have moved right, away from redistributive policies that would reduce income inequality. Immigration, meanwhile, has facilitated the move to the right: non-citizens, a larger share of the population and disproportionately poor, cannot vote; thus there is less political pressure from the bottom for redistribution than there is from the top against it. In "the choreography of American politics" inequality feeds directly into political polarization, and polarization in turn creates policies that further increase inequality.
Main Description
Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2007. The idea of America as politically polarized-that there is an unbridgeable divide between right and left, red and blue states-has become a cliche. What commentators miss, however, is that increasing polarization in recent decades has been closely accompanied by fundamental social and economic changes-most notably, a parallel rise in income inequality. In Polarized America , Nolan McCarty, Keith Poole, and Howard Rosenthal examine the relationships of polarization, wealth disparity, immigration, and other forces, characterizing it as a dance of give and take and back and forth causality. Using NOMINATE (a quantitative procedure that, like interest group ratings, scores politicians on the basis of their roll call voting records) to measure polarization in Congress and public opinion, census data and Federal Election Commission finance records to measure polarization among the public, the authors find that polarization and income inequality fell in tandem from 1913 to 1957 and rose together dramatically from 1977 on; they trace a parallel rise in immigration beginning in the 1970s. They show that Republicans have moved right, away from redistributive policies that would reduce income inequality. Immigration, meanwhile, has facilitated the move to the right: non-citizens, a larger share of the population and disproportionately poor, cannot vote; thus there is less political pressure from the bottom for redistribution than there is from the top against it. In "the choreography of American politics" inequality feeds directly into political polarization, and polarization in turn creates policies that further increase inequality.
Main Description
Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2007. The idea of America as politically polarized-that there is an unbridgeable divide between right and left, red and blue states-has become a cliche. What commentators miss, however, is that increasing polarization in recent decades has been closely accompanied by fundamental social and economic changes-most notably, a parallel rise in income inequality. In Polarized America, Nolan McCarty, Keith Poole, and Howard Rosenthal examine the relationships of polarization, wealth disparity, immigration, and other forces, characterizing it as a dance of give and take and back and forth causality. Using NOMINATE (a quantitative procedure that, like interest group ratings, scores politicians on the basis of their roll call voting records) to measure polarization in Congress and public opinion, census data and Federal Election Commission finance records to measure polarization among the public, the authors find that polarization and income inequality fell in tandem from 1913 to 1957 and rose together dramatically from 1977 on; they trace a parallel rise in immigration beginning in the 1970s. They show that Republicans have moved right, away from redistributive policies that would reduce income inequality. Immigration, meanwhile, has facilitated the move to the right: non-citizens, a larger share of the population and disproportionately poor, cannot vote; thus there is less political pressure from the bottom for redistribution than there is from the top against it. In "the choreography of American politics" inequality feeds directly into political polarization, and polarization in turn creates policies that further increase inequality.
Main Description
The idea of America as politically polarized--that there is an unbridgeable divide between right and left, red and blue states--has become a clich . What commentators miss, however, is that increasing polarization in recent decades has been closely accompanied by fundamental social and economic changes--most notably, a parallel rise in income inequality. In Polarized America, Nolan McCarty, Keith Poole, and Howard Rosenthal examine the relationships of polarization, wealth disparity, immigration, and other forces, characterizing it as a dance of give and take and back and forth causality.Using NOMINATE (a quantitative procedure that, like interest group ratings, scores politicians on the basis of their roll call voting records) to measure polarization in Congress and public opinion, census data and Federal Election Commission finance records to measure polarization among the public, the authors find that polarization and income inequality fell in tandem from 1913 to 1957 and rose together dramatically from 1977 on; they trace a parallel rise in immigration beginning in the 1970s. They show that Republicans have moved right, away from redistributive policies that would reduce income inequality. Immigration, meanwhile, has facilitated the move to the right: non-citizens, a larger share of the population and disproportionately poor, cannot vote; thus there is less political pressure from the bottom for redistribution than there is from the top against it. In "the choreography of American politics" inequality feeds directly into political polarization, and polarization in turn creates policies that further increase inequality.
Main Description
The idea of America as politically polarized--that there is an unbridgeable divide between right and left, red and blue states--has become a cliché. What commentators miss, however, is that increasing polarization in recent decades has been closely accompanied by fundamental social and economic changes--most notably, a parallel rise in income inequality. In Polarized America, Nolan McCarty, Keith Poole, and Howard Rosenthal examine the relationships of polarization, wealth disparity, immigration, and other forces, characterizing it as a dance of give and take and back and forth causality.Using NOMINATE (a quantitative procedure that, like interest group ratings, scores politicians on the basis of their roll call voting records) to measure polarization in Congress and public opinion, census data and Federal Election Commission finance records to measure polarization among the public, the authors find that polarization and income inequality fell in tandem from 1913 to 1957 and rose together dramatically from 1977 on; they trace a parallel rise in immigration beginning in the 1970s. They show that Republicans have moved right, away from redistributive policies that would reduce income inequality. Immigration, meanwhile, has facilitated the move to the right: non-citizens, a larger share of the population and disproportionately poor, cannot vote; thus there is less political pressure from the bottom for redistribution than there is from the top against it. In "the choreography of American politics" inequality feeds directly into political polarization, and polarization in turn creates policies that further increase inequality.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
The Choreography of American Politicsp. 1
Polarized Politiciansp. 15
Income Polarization and the Electoratep. 71
Immigration, Income, and the Voter's Incentive to Redistributep. 115
Campaign Finance and Polarizationp. 139
Polarization and Public Policyp. 165
Where Have You Gone, Mr. Samp. 191
Notesp. 205
Referencesp. 219
Indexp. 229
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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