Catalogue


Insurgents, terrorists, and militias : the warriors of contemporary combat /
Richard H. Shultz Jr. and Andrea J.Dew.
imprint
New York : Columbia University Press, 2006.
description
316 p. : ill.
ISBN
0231129823 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
added author
imprint
New York : Columbia University Press, 2006.
isbn
0231129823 (cloth : alk. paper)
catalogue key
5908552
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
First Chapter

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Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2006-05-15:
Some academics can see clearly what military generals and Pentagon civilian planners apparently cannotthat the nature of warfare has changed drastically in the past few decades. Shultz and Dew, of the Tufts University International Security Studies Program, grasp that combat involving nongovernment forces calls for innovative tactics by the U.S. military. Failing to understand the changed nature of warfare can lead to deadly consequences, the authors write, as the Iraq insurgency shows. This scholarly book is grounded in warfare theory, but is easily accessible for generalist readers. Looking at post-1990 conflicts in Somalia, Chechnya, Afghanistan and Iraq, "in which the armies of modern nation-states fought armed groups, often with great difficulty, in traditional societal settings," Shultz and Dew propose new taxonomies, describe the reasons nongovernment combatants wage war, and the nontraditional approaches those combatants use. Government strategists hoping to defeat these nonstate warriors must learn about the cultures and traditions of those groups rather than relying solely on how much firepower they possess, the authors argue. Helpfully moving beyond theory, they suggest ways that Pentagon policy makers and field commanders can mine historical, anthropological and cultural studies to understand shadowy enemies. (Aug.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Choice on 2006-12-01:
Schultz and Dew (Fletcher School of Diplomacy, Tufts) bring to light the impact poor linguistic, cultural, and area knowledge has on the intelligence and analysis provided to policy makers, who use the information when making the decision to go to war with a country or, more specifically, to go to war with a tribal/clan society. They examine the cases of Somalia, Chechnya, Afghanistan, and Iraq. In each case the authors highlight the failure of intelligence to provide accurate appraisals of the way in which the four tribal/clan societies view conflict among themselves and with foreigners. Schultz and Dew suggest that the US and other powers would be wise to prepare their intelligence analysts and combat forces with a more complete understanding of an adversary. Among current writings, there are none that focus on the culture of war that exists in tribal/clan societies, providing a unique perspective worth understanding. This is particularly useful for the target audience of policy makers, intelligence analysts, and military officers. Researchers and graduate students will find that this easily readable, concise work suggests further questions concerning the US approach to conflict in the decades to come. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Particularly important for national security and strategic studies collections, upper-division undergraduate through practitioners. A. B. Lowther Arkansas Tech University
Reviews
Review Quotes
An excellent primer on the nature of warfare and our likely enemies in the twenty-first century.
"An excellent primer on the nature of warfare and our likely enemies in the twenty-first century." -- "Parameters"
"An excellent primer on the nature of warfare and our likely enemies in the twenty-first century." -- Parameters
[An] excellent study.
"[An] excellent study." -- Depaak Lal, The International History
A succinct and well-presented history of the birth and growth of the extremist Muslim fundamentalist political movement.
"A succinct and well-presented history of the birth and growth of the extremist Muslim fundamentalist political movement." -- Col. Will Holahan, "Officer"
"A succinct and well-presented history of the birth and growth of the extremist Muslim fundamentalist political movement." -- Col. Will Holahan, Officer
If you are interested in either irregular warfare or counterinsurgency, you should add this book to your reading list.
Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias is a useful introduction to the topic of traditional warriors and modern warfare.
" Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias is a useful introduction to the topic of traditional warriors and modern warfare." -- Walter Ladwig, Military Review
[ Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias ] should be on every Pentagon reading list.
"[ Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias ] should be on every Pentagon reading list." -- Austin Bay, Human Events Online
"Ý "Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias"¨ should be on every Pentagon reading list." -- Austin Bay, "Human Events Online"
"[ Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias] should be on every Pentagon reading list." -- Human Events Online
The book offers an excellent model
[They] have done more than write a book on America's new enemies. The two authors have done a public service.
"[They] have done more than write a book on America's new enemies. The two authors have done a public service." -- Rowan Scarborough, The Washington Times
"ÝThey¨ have done more than write a book on America's new enemies. The two authors have done a public service." -- Rowan Scarborough, "The Washington Times"
"This is one in a handful of truly important books... It is fresh, innovative and immensely informative." -- Michael J. Bonafield, Star Tribune
"This is one in a handful of truly important books... It is fresh, innovative and immensely informative." -- Michael J. Bonafield, "Star Tribune"
"This is a thought-provoking book on a highly topical issue. It advocates examining the lessons of history to wage war successfully against asymmetric enemies. I hope it may influence policy makers to consult their historians and cultural experts before they commit themselves to conflict. Relative success in Afghanistan, set against the difficulties encountered in Iraq, point to the importance of providing one's military command with accurate cultural and historical maps." -- Sir Richard Dearlove KCMG OBE, former chief of MI6
Understanding the nature of the adversary has been the Achilles heel of the West. By studying the most relevant conflicts, Shultz and Dew draw lessons to effectively manage current and the future generation of conflicts confronting the world. It is a must read for both generalists and specialists.
"Understanding the nature of the adversary has been the Achilles heel of the West. By studying the most relevant conflicts, Shultz and Dew draw lessons to effectively manage current and the future generation of conflicts confronting the world. It is a must read for both generalists and specialists." -- Rohan Gunaratna, author of Inside Al Qaeda: Global Network of Terror
"Like it or not, the wars of tomorrow will be fought by small units of fighters who will operate unconventionally. Shultz and Dew have written a first-rate primer about these warriors of contemporary combat. Most importantly, they tell all who care& -including, one hopes, the decision makers in the Pentagon and White House& -a great deal about how to fight in places like Afghanistan and Iraq before things go wrong. Is anyone listening?" -- Seymour M. Hersh, author of Chain of Command: The Road from 9/11 to Abu Ghraib
This is a thought-provoking book on a highly topical issue. It advocates examining the lessons of history to wage war successfully against asymmetric enemies. I hope it may influence policy makers to consult their historians and cultural experts before they commit themselves to conflict. Relative success in Afghanistan, set against the difficulties encountered in Iraq, point to the importance of providing one's military command with accurate cultural and historical maps.
Like it or not, the wars of tomorrow will be fought by small units of fighters who will operate unconventionally. Shultz and Dew have written a first-rate primer about these warriors of contemporary combat. Most importantly, they tell all who care-including, one hopes, the decision makers in the Pentagon and White House-a great deal about how to fight in places like Afghanistan and Iraq before things go wrong. Is anyone listening?
" Insurgents, Terrorists and Militias: The Warriors of Contemporary Combat is an insightful look at the kinds of adversaries the men and women of our armed forces are increasingly likely to face in the future. It should be required reading for strategists, policymakers, political leaders--and our warriors." -- Senator John McCain
Insurgents, Terrorists and Militias: The Warriors of Contemporary Combat is an insightful look at the kinds of adversaries the men and women of our armed forces are increasingly likely to face in the future. It should be required reading for strategists, policymakers, political leaders--and our warriors.
" Insurgents, Terrorists and Militias: The Warriors of Contemporary Combatis an insightful look at the kinds of adversaries the men and women of our armed forces are increasingly likely to face in the future. It should be required reading for strategists, policymakers, political leaders--and our warriors." -- Senator John McCain
" Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militiasauthoritatively traces the evolution of conflict in the twenty-first century and incisively analyzes the formidable national security challenges confronting both established nation-states and the international system. The concluding section's discussion of lessons learned for policymakers, military planners, and intelligence analysts makes the book an especially valuable contribution to the literature." -- Bruce Hoffman, author of Inside Terrorismand senior fellow, Combating Terrorism Center, U.S. Military Academy, West Point, NY
Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias authoritatively traces the evolution of conflict in the twenty-first century and incisively analyzes the formidable national security challenges confronting both established nation-states and the international system. The concluding section's discussion of lessons learned for policymakers, military planners, and intelligence analysts makes the book an especially valuable contribution to the literature.
"Valuable reading... the book is carefully researched and easy to read." -- LtCol Charles L. Armstrong, "Marine Corps Gazette"
Wise and cogent.
"Wise and cogent." -- Robert Kaplan, "Wall Street Journal"
"Wise and cogent." -- Robert Kaplan, Wall Street Journal
"Wise and cogent." -- "Wall Street Journal"
Highly recommended for all senior policymakers, military planners, and soldiers on the ground who will have to confront traditional warriors face to face.
Highly recommended for all senior policymakers, military planners, and soldiers on the ground who will have to confront traditional warriors face to face. -- Canadian Military Journal
An unflinchingly thorough assessment of the unconventional warriors of modern combat, their strengths, our weaknesses in dealing with them, and how to rethink asymmetrical war planning. A first-class primer that asks all the uncomfortable questions that war-fighters, war-planners, and policymakers should ask before taking up arms against insurgents, terrorists, and militias.
"An unflinchingly thorough assessment of the unconventional warriors of modern combat, their strengths, our weaknesses in dealing with them, and how to rethink asymmetrical war planning. A first-class primer that asks all the uncomfortable questions that war-fighters, war-planners, and policymakers should ask before taking up arms against insurgents, terrorists, and militias." -- Brigadier General (Ret) Russell Howard, author of Terrorism and Counterterrorismand the former director of the Combating Terrorism Center at the U.S. Military Academy
Thoroughly researched and highly readable.... Examines how non-state armies fight, identifies the patterns and trends of their combat, and recommends how conventional militaries can defeat these irregular... organizations.
"Thoroughly researched and highly readable.... Examines how non-state armies fight, identifies the patterns and trends of their combat, and recommends how conventional militaries can defeat these irregular... organizations." -- LtCol Charles L. Armstrong, Marine Corps Gazette
This scholarly book is grounded in warfare theory, but is easily accessible for generalist readers.
"This scholarly book is grounded in warfare theory, but is easily accessible for generalist readers." -- "Publishers Weekly"
"This scholarly book is grounded in warfare theory, but is easily accessible for generalist readers." -- Publishers Weekly
This is undoubtedly the single best book written on what has become a true global war on terror.
"This is undoubtedly the single best book written on what has become a true global war on terror." -- Leo J. Daugherty, III, Ph.D., Journal of Slavic Military Studies
[This book] provides valuable insight on what must be considered to set conditions for the commitment of military forces in future conflicts.
"[This book] provides valuable insight on what must be considered to set conditions for the commitment of military forces in future conflicts." -- Proceedings Magazine, US Naval Institute
This is one in a handful of truly important books... It is fresh, innovative and immensely informative.
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, May 2006
Wall Street Journal, July 2006
Choice, December 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
Since the end of the Cold War, conventional militaries and their political leaders have confronted a new, brutal type of warfare in which non-state armed groups use asymmetrical tactics to successfully fight larger, technologically superior forces. In order to prevent future bloodshed and political chaos, it is crucial to understand how these unconventional armed groups think and to adapt to their methods of combat.Richard H. Shultz Jr. and Andrea J. Dew investigate the history and politics of modern asymmetrical warfare. By focusing on four specific hotbeds of instability& -Somalia, Chechnya, Afghanistan, and Iraq& -Shultz and Dew conduct a careful analysis of tribal culture and the value of clan associations. They examine why these "traditional" or "tribal" warriors fight, how they recruit, where they find sanctuary, and what is behind their strategy. Traveling across two centuries and several continents, Shultz and Dew examine the doctrinal, tactical, and strategic advantages and consider the historical, cultural, and anthropological factors behind the motivation and success of the warriors of contemporary combat.In their provocative argument, Shultz and Dew propose that war in the post-Cold War era cannot be waged through traditional Western methods of combat, especially when friendly states and outside organizations like al-Qaeda serve as powerful allies to the enemy. Thoroughly researched and highly readable, Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militiasexamines how non-state armies fight, identifies the patterns and trends of their combat, and recommends how conventional militaries can defeat these irregular yet highly effective organizations.
Main Description
Since the end of the Cold War, conventional militaries and their political leaders have confronted a new, brutal type of warfare in which non-state armed groups use asymmetrical tactics to successfully fight larger, technologically superior forces. In order to prevent future bloodshed and political chaos, it is crucial to understand how these unconventional armed groups think and to adapt to their methods of combat.Richard H. Shultz Jr. and Andrea J. Dew investigate the history and politics of modern asymmetrical warfare. By focusing on four specific hotbeds of instability-Somalia, Chechnya, Afghanistan, and Iraq-Shultz and Dew conduct a careful analysis of tribal culture and the value of clan associations. They examine why these "traditional" or "tribal" warriors fight, how they recruit, where they find sanctuary, and what is behind their strategy. Traveling across two centuries and several continents, Shultz and Dew examine the doctrinal, tactical, and strategic advantages and consider the historical, cultural, and anthropological factors behind the motivation and success of the warriors of contemporary combat.In their provocative argument, Shultz and Dew propose that war in the post-Cold War era cannot be waged through traditional Western methods of combat, especially when friendly states and outside organizations like al-Qaeda serve as powerful allies to the enemy. Thoroughly researched and highly readable, Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militiasexamines how non-state armies fight, identifies the patterns and trends of their combat, and recommends how conventional militaries can defeat these irregular yet highly effective organizations.
Main Description
Since the end of the Cold War, conventional militaries and their political leaders have confronted a new, brutal type of warfare in which non-state armed groups use asymmetrical tactics to successfully fight larger, technologically superior forces. In order to prevent future bloodshed and political chaos, it is crucial to understand how these unconventional armed groups think and to adapt to their methods of combat. Richard H. Shultz Jr. and Andrea J. Dew investigate the history and politics of modern asymmetrical warfare. By focusing on four specific hotbeds of instability& -Somalia, Chechnya, Afghanistan, and Iraq& -Shultz and Dew conduct a careful analysis of tribal culture and the value of clan associations. They examine why these "traditional" or "tribal" warriors fight, how they recruit, where they find sanctuary, and what is behind their strategy. Traveling across two centuries and several continents, Shultz and Dew examine the doctrinal, tactical, and strategic advantages and consider the historical, cultural, and anthropological factors behind the motivation and success of the warriors of contemporary combat. In their provocative argument, Shultz and Dew propose that war in the post-Cold War era cannot be waged through traditional Western methods of combat, especially when friendly states and outside organizations like al-Qaeda serve as powerful allies to the enemy. Thoroughly researched and highly readable, Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias examines how non-state armies fight, identifies the patterns and trends of their combat, and recommends how conventional militaries can defeat these irregular yet highly effective organizations.
Main Description
Since the end of the Cold War, conventional militaries and their political leaders have confronted a new, brutal type of warfare in which non-state armed groups use asymmetrical tactics to successfully fight larger, technologically superior forces. In order to prevent future bloodshed and political chaos, it is crucial to understand how these unconventional armed groups think and to adapt to their methods of combat. Richard H. Shultz Jr. and Andrea J. Dew investigate the history and politics of modern asymmetrical warfare. By focusing on four specific hotbeds of instability-Somalia, Chechnya, Afghanistan, and Iraq-Shultz and Dew conduct a careful analysis of tribal culture and the value of clan associations. They examine why these "traditional" or "tribal" warriors fight, how they recruit, where they find sanctuary, and what is behind their strategy. Traveling across two centuries and several continents, Shultz and Dew examine the doctrinal, tactical, and strategic advantages and consider the historical, cultural, and anthropological factors behind the motivation and success of the warriors of contemporary combat. In their provocative argument, Shultz and Dew propose that war in the post-Cold War era cannot be waged through traditional Western methods of combat, especially when friendly states and outside organizations like al-Qaeda serve as powerful allies to the enemy. Thoroughly researched and highly readable, Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias examines how non-state armies fight, identifies the patterns and trends of their combat, and recommends how conventional militaries can defeat these irregular yet highly effective organizations.
Main Description
Since the end of the Cold War, conventional militaries and their political leaders have confronted a new, brutal type of warfare in which non-state armed groups use asymmetrical tactics to successfully fight larger, technologically superior forces. In order to prevent future bloodshed and political chaos, it is crucial to understand how these unconventional armed groups think and to adapt to their methods of combat.In Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias, Richard H. Shultz Jr. and Andrea J. Dew investigate the history and politics of modern asymmetrical warfare. By focusing on four specific hotbeds of instability-Somalia, Chechnya, Afghanistan, and Iraq-Shultz and Dew conduct a careful analysis of tribal culture and the value of clan associations. They examine why these "traditional" or "tribal" warriors fight, how they recruit, where they find sanctuary, and what is behind their strategy. Traveling across two centuries and several continents, Shultz and Dew examine the doctrinal, tactical, and strategic advantages and consider the historical, cultural, and anthropological factors behind the motivation and success of the warriors of contemporary combat.In their provocative argument, Shultz and Dew propose that war in the post-Cold War era cannot be waged through traditional Western methods of combat, especially when friendly states and outside organizations like al-Qaeda serve as powerful allies to the enemy. Thoroughly researched and highly readable, Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militiasexamines how non-state armies fight, identifies the patterns and trends of their combat, and recommends how conventional militaries can defeat these irregular yet highly effective organizations.
Long Description
Since the end of the Cold War, conventional militaries and their political leaders have confronted a new, brutal type of warfare in which non-state armed groups use asymmetrical tactics to successfully fight larger, technologically superior forces. In order to prevent future bloodshed and political chaos, it is crucial to understand how these unconventional armed groups think and to adapt to their methods of combat.In "Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias," Richard H. Shultz Jr. and Andrea J. Dew investigate the history and politics of modern asymmetrical warfare. By focusing on four specific hotbeds of instability-Somalia, Chechnya, Afghanistan, and Iraq-Shultz and Dew conduct a careful analysis of tribal culture and the value of clan associations. They examine why these "traditional" or "tribal" warriors fight, how they recruit, where they find sanctuary, and what is behind their strategy. Traveling across two centuries and several continents, Shultz and Dew examine the doctrinal, tactical, and strategic advantages and consider the historical, cultural, and anthropological factors behind the motivation and success of the warriors of contemporary combat.In their provocative argument, Shultz and Dew propose that war in the post-Cold War era cannot be waged through traditional Western methods of combat, especially when friendly states and outside organizations like al-Qaeda serve as powerful allies to the enemy. Thoroughly researched and highly readable, "Insurgents, Terrorists, and Militias" examines how non-state armies fight, identifies the patterns and trends of their combat, and recommends how conventional militaries can defeat these irregular yet highly effectiveorganizations.
Table of Contents
War After the Cold Warp. 1
Assessing Enemiesp. 17
Tribes and Clansp. 39
Somalia: Death, Disorder, and Destructionp. 57
Chechnya: Russia's Bloody Quagmirep. 103
Afghanistan: A Superpower Conundrump. 147
Iraq: From Dictatorship to Democracy?p. 197
When Soldiers Fight Warriors: Lessons Learned for Policymakers, Military Planners, and Intelligence Analystsp. 259
Acknowledgmentsp. 271
Notesp. 273
Indexp. 303
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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