Catalogue

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Jack Kennedy : the education of a statesman /
Barbara Leaming.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
New York : W.W. Norton & Company, c2006.
description
509 p.
ISBN
0393051617 (hardcover), 9780393051612 (hardcover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : W.W. Norton & Company, c2006.
isbn
0393051617 (hardcover)
9780393051612 (hardcover)
catalogue key
5903980
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Awards
This item was nominated for the following awards:
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2006-04-03:
Hollywood chronicler Leaming (Orson Welles; Katharine Hepburn) overreaches and overstates in her first attempt at political biography. Leaming endeavors to show how JFK's WWII-era relationships with British aristocrats (such as his doomed brother-in-law, Billy Hartington, heir to the duke of Devonshire), together with extensive readings in British political history and an idealization of Churchill, formed the mature Kennedy's brinkmanship approach to the Cold War. Leaming fails to point out that President Kennedy's modus operandi with regard to the Soviets followed precedent established by Truman and Eisenhower, and that JFK was often a junior partner in policies articulated by such NATO leaders as British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan-all of them, of course, influenced to some extent by Churchill, who had first articulated the concept of an iron curtain. That Kennedy idealized and romanticized the British aristocracy is true. That this idealization had a great impact on his presidential philosophy regarding foreign policy is somewhat less so. In fact, America's longstanding cultural, emotional and ethical alliance with Britain, and the need to play hardball in the face of early 1960s Soviet aggression, would have gone a long way toward defining JFK's tactics in international relations even had he not visited England as a young man. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Appeared in Library Journal on 2006-01-01:
Harvard student Kennedy got his first taste of statesmanship in England, where his father was ambassador, argues best-selling biographer Leaming. With a six-city tour. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Library Journal, January 2006
Library Journal, April 2006
Publishers Weekly, April 2006
New York Times Book Review, June 2006
Washington Post, July 2006
Reference & Research Book News, August 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Long Description
The enthralling, previously untold story of the friendships and forces that shaped the Kennedy presidency. In the summer of 1938 a tall, raw-boned Harvard student arrived in London, where his father was the American ambassador and his favorite sister, Kick, had gained entree to a closed group of young aristocrats. In the run-up to World War II, as Winston Churchill called on a reluctant Britain to resist Adolf Hitler before it was too late, Jack Kennedy formed bonds of friendship and family that would forever change his life and the course of American history. Drawing on many new primary sources, this book is the first to trace the dramatic arc of Kennedy's intellectual and political formation, and to detail the goals of his presidency as he saw them. For the first time we get an intimate picture of a leader torn between politics and principle, a president wrestling with private demons and unresolved conflicts dating back to the 1930s, when Churchill and Ambassador Joseph Kennedy were adversaries on the public stage. 24 pages of photographs.
Library of Congress Summary
The story of the friendships and forces that shaped the Kennedy presidency. In the summer of 1938 a tall Harvard student arrived in London, where his father was the American ambassador and his sister had gained entrée to a group of young aristocrats. As Winston Churchill called on a reluctant Britain to resist Hitler before it was too late, Jack Kennedy formed bonds of friendship and family that would forever change his life and the course of American history. Drawing on many new primary sources, this book is the first to trace the arc of Kennedy's intellectual and political formation, and to detail the goals of his presidency as he saw them, giving an intimate picture of a leader torn between politics and principle, a president wrestling with private demons and unresolved conflicts dating back to the 1930s, when Churchill and Ambassador Joseph Kennedy were adversaries on the public stage.--From publisher description.
Main Description
Drawing on new primary sources, this biography is the first to detail the influence of British history, literature, and culture-in particular, the ideas of Winston Churchill-on America's thirty-fifth president. For the first time we trace the friendships and forces that led to the White House and shaped Kennedy's actions there. In this intimate portrait of a leader torn between politics and principle, we finally come to know the man Kennedy wanted to be and understand his long, private struggle to become that man. Book jacket.
Table of Contents
The Twenty-Five-Year Conversationp. 9
The Aristocratic Cousinhoodp. 39
Sunset Glow before the Stormp. 63
The Form Most Pleasing to His Audiencep. 95
Billy Hartington Wants to Knowp. 122
Straw in the Windp. 138
What about You?p. 154
By Watching England We Will Have Much to Learnp. 169
A Divided Naturep. 195
To Find a Beginningp. 221
On the Churchill Ticketp. 235
What the Man Would Like to Bep. 258
The Meaning of "Miscalculation"p. 289
The Edge of the Precipicep. 316
The Go-Betweenp. 334
A Lesson in Dutyp. 359
In Reading the History of Past Wars and How They Beganp. 383
Before It Is Too Latep. 413
Epiloguep. 439
Acknowledgmentsp. 443
Source Notesp. 445
Indexp. 493
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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