Catalogue

COVID-19: Updates on library services and operations.

A seat at the table : Huston Smith in conversation with native Americans on religious freedom /
edited and with a preface by Phil Cousineau ; with assistance from Gary Rhine.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2006.
description
xxi, 232 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520244397 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2006.
isbn
0520244397 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5903920
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 205-218) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
""A Seat At The Table" is a valuable and insightful book about a too long overlooked topic - the right of Native American people to have their sacred sites and practices honored and protected. Let's hope it gets read far and wide, enough to bring about a real shift in policy and consciousness."--Bonnie Raitt "Phil Cousineau has created a fine companion book to accompany the important film he and Gary Rhine have made in defense of the religious traditions of Native Americans. [Native Americans] are recognized the world over as keepers of a vital piece of the Creator's original orders, and yet they are regarded as little more than squatters at home. This book features impressive interviews, beautiful illustrations, and gives a voice to the voiceless."--Peter Coyote
Flap Copy
" A Seat At The Table is a valuable and insightful book about a too long overlooked topic - the right of Native American people to have their sacred sites and practices honored and protected. Let's hope it gets read far and wide, enough to bring about a real shift in policy and consciousness."--Bonnie Raitt "Phil Cousineau has created a fine companion book to accompany the important film he and Gary Rhine have made in defense of the religious traditions of Native Americans. [Native Americans] are recognized the world over as keepers of a vital piece of the Creator's original orders, and yet they are regarded as little more than squatters at home. This book features impressive interviews, beautiful illustrations, and gives a voice to the voiceless."--Peter Coyote
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-05-01:
This excellent volume presents interviews conducted by religious historian Smith (emer., Syracuse) with noted Native scholars, activists, and leaders. What makes it important and unique are the words and voices of highly respected Native Americans who help readers understand the 500-year-long struggle for indigenous religious rights in North America, and other issues and challenges relating to practice and preservation of Native spirituality. These include language; loss of land, rivers, and forests to development despite the centrality of land, place, and indigenous plants and animals to spiritual tradition; protection of endangered sacred sites; legal impediments; cultural appropriation; prisoners' rights; and the Human Genome Project. In 1999, Smith interviewed the late Vine Deloria Jr. (Lakota), Winona LaDuke (Anishinabe), Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee), Frank Dayish Jr. (Navajo), Charlotte Black Elk (Lakota), Douglas George-Kanentiio (Mohawk), Lenny Foster (Dine), Tonya Gonnella Frichner (Onondaga), Anthony Guy Lopez (Lakota), and Oren Lyons (Onondaga) during and after their participation in the World Parliament of Religions in Cape Town, South Africa. The book's title was aptly chosen; this was the first time that First Nations religious delegates participated in this parliament. This work shares its title with the 2005 award-winning documentary written by Cousineau and produced by Rhine, the author's late colleague and collaborator. ^BSumming Up: Highly recommended. All levels. M. Cedar Face Southern Oregon University
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2005-09-12:
In 1999, Smith, renowned authority on world religions, accompanied a delegation of Native American religious leaders to the World Parliament of Religions in Cape Town, South Africa. These delegates contended that understanding the world's religions was impossible without considering the indigenous religions of the New World, which had so often been overlooked. This book grew out of a documentary film of the sessions at the parliament called A Seat at the Table: Struggling for American Indian Religious Freedom. Smith interviewed Native American leaders ranging from the well-known (Vine Deloria Jr., Walter Echo-Hawk and Charlotte Black Elk) to the less widely recognized, such as Lenny Foster and Tonya Gonella Frichner. The remarkable conversations trace the common thread that Native Americans follow a spiritual path imbuing all their life, encompassing art, morality and literature. Topics include the fight for prisoners' rights, ceremonial rituals, the role of elders and the genius of oral traditions. Smith's interlocutors plead for a restoration of religious freedom so long repressed by an American government they believe is seeking to displace tribes from their lands and rob them of their tribal and spiritual identities. The interviews provide a fine introduction to Native American religions. (Nov.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Publishers Weekly, September 2005
Choice, May 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Back Cover Copy
""A Seat At The Table is a valuable and insightful book about a too long overlooked topic - the right of Native American people to have their sacred sites and practices honored and protected. Let's hope it gets read far and wide, enough to bring about a real shift in policy and consciousness."--Bonnie Raitt"Phil Cousineau has created a fine companion book to accompany the important film he and Gary Rhine have made in defense of the religious traditions of Native Americans. [Native Americans] are recognized the world over as keepers of a vital piece of the Creator's original orders, and yet they are regarded as little more than squatters at home. This book features impressive interviews, beautiful illustrations, and gives a voice to the voiceless."--Peter Coyote
Bowker Data Service Summary
Ten influential Native American spiritual & political leaders in conversation with Huston Smith about their 500 year struggle for religious freedom.
Main Description
In this collection of illuminating conversations, renowned historian of world religions Huston Smith invites ten influential American Indian spiritual and political leaders to talk about their five-hundred-year struggle for religious freedom. Their intimate, impassioned dialogues yield profound insights into one of the most striking cases of tragic irony in history: the country that prides itself on religious freedom has resolutely denied those same rights to its own indigenous people. With remarkable erudition and curiosity--and respectfully framing his questions in light of the revelation that his discovery of Native American religion helped him round out his views of the world's religions--Smith skillfully helps reveal the depth of the speakers' knowledge and experience. American Indian leaders Vine Deloria, Jr. (Standing Rock Sioux), Winona LaDuke (Anishshinaabeg), Walter Echo-Hawk (Pawnee), Frank Dayish, Jr. (Navajo), Charlotte Black Elk (Oglala Lakota), Douglas George-Kanentiio (Mohawk-Iroquois), Lenny Foster (Dine/Navajo), Tonya Gonnella Frichner (Onondaga), Anthony Guy Lopez (Lakota-Sioux), and Oren Lyons (Onondaga) provide an impressive overview of the critical issues facing the Native American community today. Their ideas about spirituality, politics, relations with the U.S. government, their place in American society, and the continuing vitality of their communities give voice to a population that is all too often ignored in contemporary discourse. The culture they describe is not a relic of the past, nor a historical curiosity, but a living tradition that continues to shape Native American lives.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Prefacep. xiii
The Indian Way of Storyp. xxi
Introduction: The Primal Religionsp. 1
The Spiritual Malaise in America: The Confluence of Religion, Law, and Communityp. 6
Five Hundred Nations Within One: The Search for Religious Justicep. 24
Ecology and Spirituality: Following the Path of Natural Lawp. 39
The Homelands of Religion: The Clash of Worldviews Over Prayer, Place, and Ceremonyp. 58
Native Language, Native Spirituality: From Crisis to Challengep. 75
The Triumph of the Native American Church: Celebrating the Free Exercise of Religionp. 97
The Fight for Native American Prisoners' Rights: The Red Road to Rehabilitationp. 113
Stealing Our Spirit: The Threat of the Human Genome Diversity Projectp. 130
The Fight for Mount Graham: Looking for the Fingerprints of Godp. 146
Redeeming the Future: The Traditional Instructions of Spiritual Lawp. 162
The Healing of Indian Country: Kinship, Custom, Ceremony, and Oratoryp. 184
Afterwordp. 201
Notesp. 205
Bibliographyp. 211
Acknowledgmentsp. 217
Indexp. 219
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem