Catalogue


Madness at home : the psychiatrist, the patient, and the family in England, 1820-1860 /
Akihito Suzuki.
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2006.
description
xii, 259 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0520245806 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780520245808
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Berkeley : University of California Press, c2006.
isbn
0520245806 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520245808
contents note
Commissions of lunacy: background, sources, and content -- The structure of psychiatric practice -- The problems of liberty and property -- Managing lunatics within the domestic sphere -- Destabilizing the domestic psychiatric regime -- Public authorities and the ambiguities of the lunatic at home.
catalogue key
5895836
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-248) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Flap Copy
"A brilliant and profoundly original book, one of the most important contributions to the history of psychiatry in the past decade."--Andrew Scull, co-author ofCustomers and Patrons of the Mad-Trade: The Management of Lunacy in Eighteenth-Century London "Suzuki's sophisticated and revealing account is a persuasive reminder that the family's recent involvement in mental health care policy-making is nothing new. As he shows, in more ways than one, madness does indeed begin at home."--Ian Dowbiggin, author ofA Concise History of Euthanasia: Life, Death, God and Medicine "Suzuki beautifully composes a portrait of domestic care for the insane in nineteenth century England. In this text, Suzuki skillfully and elegantly explores the importance of family relationships in the identification, treatment and re-integration of the insane. Suzuki elucidates the web of relationships which marked out the private and public worlds of insanity in the long nineteenth century and captures the interplay of different actors who were engaged in the care, treatment, and disposal of those considered mad."--Joseph Melling, author ofThe Politics of Madness: Insanity and the English Asylum, 1845-1914
Flap Copy
"A brilliant and profoundly original book, one of the most important contributions to the history of psychiatry in the past decade."--Andrew Scull, co-author of "Customers and Patrons of the Mad-Trade: The Management of Lunacy in Eighteenth-Century London" "Suzuki's sophisticated and revealing account is a persuasive reminder that the family's recent involvement in mental health care policy-making is nothing new. As he shows, in more ways than one, madness does indeed begin at home."--Ian Dowbiggin, author of "A Concise History of Euthanasia: Life, Death, God and Medicine" "Suzuki beautifully composes a portrait of domestic care for the insane in nineteenth century England. In this text, Suzuki skillfully and elegantly explores the importance of family relationships in the identification, treatment and re-integration of the insane. Suzuki elucidates the web of relationships which marked out the private and public worlds of insanity in the long nineteenth century and captures the interplay of different actors who were engaged in the care, treatment, and disposal of those considered mad."--Joseph Melling, author of "The Politics of Madness: Insanity and the English Asylum, 1845-1914"
Flap Copy
"A brilliant and profoundly original book, one of the most important contributions to the history of psychiatry in the past decade."--Andrew Scull, co-author of Customers and Patrons of the Mad-Trade: The Management of Lunacy in Eighteenth-Century London "Suzuki's sophisticated and revealing account is a persuasive reminder that the family's recent involvement in mental health care policy-making is nothing new. As he shows, in more ways than one, madness does indeed begin at home."--Ian Dowbiggin, author of A Concise History of Euthanasia: Life, Death, God and Medicine "Suzuki beautifully composes a portrait of domestic care for the insane in nineteenth century England. In this text, Suzuki skillfully and elegantly explores the importance of family relationships in the identification, treatment and re-integration of the insane. Suzuki elucidates the web of relationships which marked out the private and public worlds of insanity in the long nineteenth century and captures the interplay of different actors who were engaged in the care, treatment, and disposal of those considered mad."--Joseph Melling, author of The Politics of Madness: Insanity and the English Asylum, 1845-1914
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
A study on the care of mentally ill people in England during the 19th century, with particular focus on the role of the family.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Akihito Suzuki's richly detailed social history includes several fascinating case histories and looks closely at little studied source material to provide an illuminating historical perspective on our own day and age, when the mentally ill are mainly treated at home and in the community.
Back Cover Copy
"A brilliant and profoundly original book, one of the most important contributions to the history of psychiatry in the past decade."--Andrew Scull, co-author of "Customers and Patrons of the Mad-Trade: The Management of Lunacy in Eighteenth-Century London "Suzuki's sophisticated and revealing account is a persuasive reminder that the family's recent involvement in mental health care policy-making is nothing new. As he shows, in more ways than one, madness does indeed begin at home."--Ian Dowbiggin, author of "A Concise History of Euthanasia: Life, Death, God and Medicine "Suzuki beautifully composes a portrait of domestic care for the insane in nineteenth century England. In this text, Suzuki skillfully and elegantly explores the importance of family relationships in the identification, treatment and re-integration of the insane. Suzuki elucidates the web of relationships which marked out the private and public worlds of insanity in the long nineteenth century and captures the interplay of different actors who were engaged in the care, treatment, and disposal of those considered mad."--Joseph Melling, author of "The Politics of Madness: Insanity and the English Asylum, 1845-1914
Long Description
The history of psychiatric institutions and the psychiatric profession is by now familiar: asylums multiplied in nineteenth-century England and psychiatry established itself as a medical specialty around the same time. We are, however, largely ignorant about madness at home in this key period: what were the family's attitudes toward its insane member, what were patient's lives like when they remained at home? Until now, most accounts have suggested that the family and community gradually abdicated responsibility for taking care of mentally ill members to the doctors who ran the asylums. However, this provocatively argued study, painting a fascinating picture of how families viewed and managed madness, suggests that the family actually played a critical role in caring for the insane and in the development of psychiatry itself. Akihito Suzuki's richly detailed social history includes several fascinating case histories, looks closely at little studied source material including press reports of formal legal declarations of insanity, or Commissions of Lunacy, and also provides an illuminating historical perspective on our own day and age, when the mentally ill are mainly treated in home and community.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Psychiatry in the Private and the Public Spheres
Commissions of Lunacy: Background, Sources, and Content
The Structure of Psychiatric Practice
The Problems of Liberty and Property
Managing Lunatics within the Domestic Sphere
Destabilizing the Domestic Psychiatric Regime
Public Authorities and the Ambiguities of the Lunatic at Home
Conclusion
Appendix
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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