Catalogue


Whose body is it anyway? : justice and the integrity of the person /
Cécile Fabre.
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2006.
description
xiv, 232 p. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0199289999 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Oxford : Clarendon Press ; Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2006.
isbn
0199289999 (alk. paper)
standard identifier
9780199289998
contents note
A rights-based theory of justice -- Good samaritanism -- A civilian service -- Confiscating cadaveric organs -- Confiscating live body parts -- Organ sales -- Prostitution -- Surrogacy contracts.
catalogue key
5891958
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [222]-228) and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
Review Quotes
1. A Rights-based Theory of Justice 2. Good Samaritanism 3. A Civilian Service 4. Confiscating Cadaveric Organs 5. Confiscating Live Body Parts 6. Organ Sales 7. Prostitution 8. Surrogacy Contracts Conclusion
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
This work explores the implications that arguments for distributive justice have for the rights we have over ourselves. It looks at topical issues such as good Samaritanism, organ confiscation, organ sales, prostitution and surrogate motherhood.
Long Description
If there is one thing that is beyond the reach of others, it is our body in particular, and our person in general. Our legal and political tradition is such that we have the right to deny others access to our person and body, even though doing so would harm those who need personal services from us, or body parts. But are these rights as watertight as they seem? Cecile Fabre's controversial and original book teases out the unexplored implications that arguments for distributive justice have for the rights we have over ourselves, by looking at topical issues such as good Samaritanism, organ confiscation, organ sales, prostitution, and surrogate motherhood.
Main Description
If there is one thing that is beyond the reach of others, it is our body in particular, and our person in general. Our legal and political tradition is such that we have the right to deny others access to our person and body, even though doing so would harm those who need personal services from us, or body parts. But are these rights as watertight as they seem? C cile Fabre's controversial and original book teases out the unexplored implications that arguments for distributive justice have for the rights we have over ourselves, by looking at topical issues such as good Samaritanism, organ confiscation, organ sales, prostitution, and surrogate motherhood.
Main Description
In the prevailing liberal ethos, if there is one thing that is beyond the reach of others, it is our body in particular, and our person in general: our legal and political tradition is such that we have the right to deny others access to our person and body, even though doing so would harmthose who need personal services from us, or body parts. However, we lack the right to use ourselves as we wish in order to raise income, even though we do not necessarily harm others by doing so---even though we might in fact benefit them by doing so. Cecile Fabre's aim in this book is to show that, according to the principles of distributive justice which inform most liberal democracies, both in practice and in theory, it should be exactly the other way around: that is, if it is true that we lack the right to withhold access to materialresources from those who need them, we also lack the right to withhold access to our body from those who need it; but we do, under some circumstances, have the right to decide how to use it in order to raise income. More specifically, she argues in favour of the confiscation of body parts andpersonal services, as well as of the commercialization of organs, sex, and reproductive capacities.
Table of Contents
A Rights-based Theory of Justice
Good Samaritanism
A Civilian Service
Confiscating Cadaveric Organs
Confiscating Live Body Parts
Organ Sales
Prostitution
Surrogacy Contracts
Conclusion
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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