Catalogue

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Strangers nowhere in the world : the rise of cosmopolitanism in early modern Europe /
Margaret C. Jacob.
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2006.
description
187 p. : ill.
ISBN
0812239334 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780812239331
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, c2006.
isbn
0812239334 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780812239331
catalogue key
5890560
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-06-01:
Being cosmopolitan in the early modern period (1650-1800) as well as today requires thinking beyond national, religious, and ethnic identities to accept and be comfortable with foreigners at home and abroad. More than another history of high ideas, Jacob's book focuses on cultural practices, behaviors, social habits, and mores from the daily past. To the dismay of Church fathers in southern France, Inquisition records revealed the mingling of Christians and Jews, Protestants and Catholics who breached class lines and committed other "border crossing" that indicated the emergence of cosmopolitan society. Jacob (UCLA) also examines the fraternizing Masonic brotherhoods, the jostling of traders and merchants in the very public stock markets across northern and western European cities, and the clubbing of genteel alchemists and naturalists who busily distilled plants or made air pumps in the open setting of natural inquiry. All of these interactions nurtured cosmopolitan values and ideals. The book concludes with liberal Protestants and republican revolutionaries of the 1790s who sought to remake the world and in the process invented the bohemian. By the late 18th century, a preexisting set of assumptions, vocabularies, and experiences identifiably cosmopolitan and present for a century or more made the international republican movement, which included universal principles like the equality of man, happen more easily. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All academic levels/libraries. D. J. Heimmermann University of North Alabama
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Although the book's focus lies across the Atlantic, centuries ago, Strangers Nowhere in the World has much to tell Americans and other contemporaries who would call themselves 'citizens of the world.'"- Wall Street Journal
"Although the book's focus lies across the Atlantic, centuries ago,Strangers Nowhere in the Worldhas much to tell Americans and other contemporaries who would call themselves 'citizens of the world.'"--Wall Street Journal
"Elegantly written, intellectually stimulating, and politically insightful."- American Historical Review
"Elegantly written, intellectually stimulating, and politically insightful."--American Historical Review
This item was reviewed in:
Wall Street Journal, July 2006
Choice, June 2007
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The mingling of aristocrats and commoners in a southern French city, the jostling of foreigners in stock markets across northern and western Europe - Jacob provides glimpses of the cosmopolitan ethos that emerged over the course of the 17th and 18th centuries.
Long Description
Focusing on Europe from roughly 1650 to 1800, Jacob investigates the rise of the cosmopolitan ideal in the early modem period. Utilizing records from the Inquisition, spy reports, scientific minutes, and the writings of revolutionaries, Jacob illustrates how by the late eighteenth century it had become possible to advocate being a cosmopolitan.
Main Description
The mingling of aristocrats and commoners in a southern French city, the jostling of foreigners in stock markets across northern and western Europe, the club gatherings in Paris and London of genteel naturalists busily distilling plants or making air pumps, the ritual fraternizing of "brothers" in privacy and even secrecy--Margaret Jacob invokes all these examples inStrangers Nowhere in the Worldto provide glimpses of the cosmopolitan ethos that gradually emerged over the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Jacob investigates what it was to be cosmopolitan in Europe during the early modern period. Then--as now--being cosmopolitan meant the ability to experience people of different nations, creeds, and colors with pleasure, curiosity, and interest. Yet such a definition did not come about automatically, nor could it always be practiced easily by those who embraced its principles. Cosmopolites had to strike a delicate balance between the transgressive and the subversive, the radical and the dangerous, the open-minded and the libertine. Jacob traces the history of this precarious balancing act to illustrate how ideals about cosmopolitanism were eventually transformed into lived experiences and practices. From the representatives of the Inquisition who found the mixing of Catholics and Protestants and other types of "border crossing" disruptive to their authority, to the struggles within urbane masonic lodges to open membership to Jews, Jacob also charts the moments when the cosmopolitan impulse faltered. Jacob pays particular attention to the impact of science and merchant life on the emergence of the cosmopolitan ideal. In the decades after 1650, modern scientific practices coalesced and science became an open enterprise. Experiments were witnessed in social settings of natural inquiry, congenial for the inculcation of cosmopolitan mores. Similarly, the public venues of the stock exchanges brought strangers and foreigners together in ways encouraging them to be cosmopolites. The amount of international and global commerce increased greatly after 1700, and luxury tastes developed that valorized foreign patterns and designs. Drawing upon sources as various as Inquisition records and spy reports, minutes of scientific societies and the writings of political revolutionaries,Strangers Nowhere in the Worldreveals a moment in European history when an ideal of cultural openness came to seem strong enough to counter centuries of chauvinism and xenophobia. Perhaps at no time since, Jacob cautions, has that cosmopolitan ideal seemed more fragile and elusive than it is today.
Main Description
The mingling of aristocrats and commoners in a southern French city, the jostling of foreigners in stock markets across northern and western Europe, the club gatherings in Paris and London of genteel naturalists busily distilling plants or making air pumps, the ritual fraternizing of "brothers" in privacy and even secrecy-Margaret Jacob invokes all these examples in Strangers Nowhere in the World to provide glimpses of the cosmopolitan ethos that gradually emerged over the course of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Jacob investigates what it was to be cosmopolitan in Europe during the early modern period. Then-as now-being cosmopolitan meant the ability to experience people of different nations, creeds, and colors with pleasure, curiosity, and interest. Yet such a definition did not come about automatically, nor could it always be practiced easily by those who embraced its principles. Cosmopolites had to strike a delicate balance between the transgressive and the subversive, the radical and the dangerous, the open-minded and the libertine. Jacob traces the history of this precarious balancing act to illustrate how ideals about cosmopolitanism were eventually transformed into lived experiences and practices. From the representatives of the Inquisition who found the mixing of Catholics and Protestants and other types of "border crossing" disruptive to their authority, to the struggles within urbane masonic lodges to open membership to Jews, Jacob also charts the moments when the cosmopolitan impulse faltered. Jacob pays particular attention to the impact of science and merchant life on the emergence of the cosmopolitan ideal. In the decades after 1650, modern scientific practices coalesced and science became an open enterprise. Experiments were witnessed in social settings of natural inquiry, congenial for the inculcation of cosmopolitan mores. Similarly, the public venues of the stock exchanges brought strangers and foreigners together in ways encouraging them to be cosmopolites. The amount of international and global commerce increased greatly after 1700, and luxury tastes developed that valorized foreign patterns and designs. Drawing upon sources as various as Inquisition records and spy reports, minutes of scientific societies and the writings of political revolutionaries, Strangers Nowhere in the World reveals a moment in European history when an ideal of cultural openness came to seem strong enough to counter centuries of chauvinism and xenophobia. Perhaps at no time since, Jacob cautions, has that cosmopolitan ideal seemed more fragile and elusive than it is today.
Table of Contents
Introductionp. 1
Censors, Inquisitors, and Cosmopolitesp. 13
Alchemy, Science, and a Universalist Languagep. 41
Markets Not So Freep. 66
Secrecy and the Paradox at the Heart of Modernity (the Masonic Moment)p. 95
Liberals, Radicals, and Bohemiansp. 122
Epiloguep. 144
Notesp. 147
Indexp. 181
Acknowledgmentsp. 189
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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