Catalogue


Eighteenth-century letters and British culture /
Clare Brant.
imprint
Basingstoke [England] : Palgrave Macmillian, 2006.
description
x, 431 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
140399482X (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Basingstoke [England] : Palgrave Macmillian, 2006.
isbn
140399482X (cloth)
catalogue key
5884379
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 337-417) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Clare Brant is Senior Lecturer in English at King's College London, UK
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-10-01:
The product of laborious and intelligent reading, this book surveys an important and prolific 18th-century literary genre, the personal letter. Departing from the practice of earlier works--e.g., Bruce Redford's The Converse of the Pen (CH, Jun'87), which examined such canonical authors as Montagu, Gray, and Walpole--Brant (King's College, UK) organizes her book thematically. This approach has the advantage of allowing the author to "call[] into question the status of canonical authors as canonical letter-writers" and also draws attention to "the immense quality and diversity of eighteenth-century letters." After an opening meditation on the concept of letter writing in the 18th century and a discussion of the book's approach, Brant examines numerous individual letters under such organizational rubrics as "writing as a lover," "writing as a criminal," "writing as a Christian," etc. Eclectic in its criticism, lucid in structure, and lively (even trenchant) in style, this study summarizes and extends the recent critical conversation on 18th-century letter writing. This will not be the last word on the topic but, given the book's remarkable range and inclusiveness, it will surely stand as an indispensable resource and touchstone for the next generation of scholars. ^BSumming Up: Essential. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. A. W. Lee Kentucky Wesleyan College
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Brant makes illuminating connections between the practice of letter-writing and the development of print journalism . . .Eighteenth-Century Letters and British Cultureis a dense book full of brilliant insights. It distills an immense amount of reading and fully vindicates its assertion of the cultural significance of letters." --Times Literary Supplement
"Brant makes illuminating connections between the practice of letter-writing and the development of print journalism . . . "Eighteenth-Century Letters and British Culture" is a dense book full of brilliant insights. It distills an immense amount of reading and fully vindicates its assertion of the cultural significance of letters." --"Times Literary Supplement"
"Brant makes illuminating connections between the practice of letter-writing and the development of print journalism . . . Eighteenth-Century Letters and British Culture is a dense book full of brilliant insights. It distills an immense amount of reading and fully vindicates its assertion of the cultural significance of letters." -- Times Literary Supplement
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, October 2006
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Summaries
Description for Bookstore
A wide-ranging study of letter-writing in the eighteenth century, this book explores epistolatory forms and practices in relation to important areas of British culture.
Main Description
A major study of letter-writing in the eighteenth century, this book explores epistolary forms and practices in important areas of British culture. Who wrote letters? Who read letters? What were the conventions of letters and how were they understood? Each chapter explores these questions in relation to a series of characters, including men and women of letters, parents, lovers, criminals, citizens, travellers, historians and Christians. Bringing together a wide range of epistolary materials, both non-fictional and fictional, this original and important study gives an extensively researched understanding of the central place of letters in eighteenth-century writing, and a new way of looking at eighteenth-century life. The book will be of immense value to literary scholars and historians alike, and marks an important milestone in eighteenth-century studies. Book jacket.
Long Description
A wide-ranging study of letter-writing in the eighteenth century, this book explores epistolatory forms and practices in relation to important areas of British culture. Organised around a series of characters, each chapter explores with depth and breadth the patterns of letter-writing and letter-reading in the period. Familiar ideas about epistolatory fiction and personal correspondence, and public and private, are re-examined in the light of alternative paradigms, showing how the letter is a genre at the centre of eighteenth-century life.
Bowker Data Service Summary
A study of letter-writing in the 18th century, this book explores epistolary forms and practices. Ideas about epistolary fiction are re-examined in the light of alternative paradigms, showing how the letter is a genre during the period.
Main Description
A wide-ranging study of letter-writing in the eighteenth century, this book explores epistolatory forms and practices in relation to important areas of British culture. Organised around a series of characters, each chapter explores with depth and breadth the patterns of letter-writing and letter-reading in the period. Familiar ideas about epistolatory fiction and personal correspondence, and public and private, are re-examined in the light of alternative paradigms, showing how the letter isa genre at the centre of eighteenth-century life.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgementsp. viii
A Letter of Introductionp. 1
Learning to Writep. 33
Writing as a Parentp. 60
Writing as a Loverp. 93
Writing as a Criminalp. 125
Writing as a Citizenp. 169
Writing as a Travellerp. 213
Writing as a Historianp. 246
Writing as a Christianp. 281
Postscriptp. 331
Notesp. 337
Short Bibliographyp. 405
Indexp. 418
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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