Catalogue


1001 ways to reward employees /
Bob Nelson.
edition
Rev., updated. ed.
imprint
New York : Workman Pub., c2005.
description
381 p. ; 21 cm.
ISBN
0761136819 (alk. paper), 9780761136811
format(s)
Book
Holdings
Subjects
More Details
imprint
New York : Workman Pub., c2005.
isbn
0761136819 (alk. paper)
9780761136811
catalogue key
5882007
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
DAY-TO-DAY RECOGNITION In my doctoral research on why managers use or don't use recognition with their employees, I found the top variable distinguishing those managers who use recognition was that they felt it was their responsibility-not corporate's or human resources'-to create the motivational environment for their people. They truly believed that recognizing their deserving employees played an integral part in how those workers felt about their jobs. This finding coincides with what my research shows are the most important ways that employees prefer to be recognized when they do good work-that is, simple day-to-day behaviors that any manager can express with their employees, the most important of which is praise. The best praise is done soon, specifically, sincerely, personally, positively, and proactively. In a matter of seconds, a simple praise conveys, "I saw what you did, I appreciate it, here's why it's important, and here's how it makes me feel"-a lot of punch in a small package! Four out of the top ten categories of motivators reported by employees in my research are forms of praise, and these categories make up the four chapters in Part I: personal praise, written praise, electronic praise, and public praise. Now, you might say, "Are these really different types of praise? Don't they all have the same effect?" This was my initial thought, too, but I learned that these types of praise are in fact distinct from one another. Praising someone in person means something different to that person than writing him or her a note, and these forms of praise are both different from praising the person in public. To get the maximum impact out of this simple behavior, vary the forms you use, and use them all frequently. Research by Dr. Gerald Graham of Wichita State University supports these observations. In multiple studies, he found that employees preferred personalized, instant recognition from their direct supervisors more than any other kind of motivation. In fact, in another survey of American workers, 63 percent of the respondents ranked "a pat on the back" as a meaningful incentive. In Graham's studies, employees perceived that manager-initiated rewards for performance were done least often, and that company-initiated rewards for presence (that is, rewards based simply on being in the organization) occurred most often. Dr. Graham concluded, "It appears that the techniques that have the greatest motivational impact are practiced the least, even though they are easier and less expensive to use." Graham's study determined the top five motivating techniques reported by employees to be: 1. The manager personally congratulates employees who do a good job. 2. The manager writes personal notes about good performance. 3. The organization uses performance as the basis for promotion. 4. The manager publicly recognizes employees for good performance. 5. The manager holds morale-building meetings to celebrate success. Ideally, you should vary the ways you recognize your staff while still trying to do things on a day-to-day basis. For example, Robin Horder-Koop, manager of programs and services at Amway Corporation, the distributor of house and personal-care products and other goods in Ada, MI, uses these inexpensive ways to recognize the 200 people who work for her on a day-to-day basis: On days when some workloads are light, the department's employees help out workers in other departments. After accumulating eight hours of such work, employees get a thank-you note from Horder-Koop. Additional time earns a luncheon with company officials in the executive dining room. All workers are recognized on a rotating basis. Each month, photos of different employees are displayed on a bulletin bo
First Chapter
DAY-TO-DAY RECOGNITION In my doctoral research on why managers use or dont use recognition with their employees, I found the top variable distinguishing those managers who use recognition was that they felt it was their responsibilitynot corporates or human resourcesto create the motivational environment for their people. They truly believed that recognizing their deserving employees played an integral part in how those workers felt about their jobs. This finding coincides with what my research shows are the most important ways that employees prefer to be recognized when they do good workthat is, simple day-to-day behaviors that any manager can express with their employees, the most important of which is praise. The best praise is done soon, specifically, sincerely, personally, positively, and proactively. In a matter of seconds, a simple praise conveys, I saw what you did, I appreciate it, heres why its important, and heres how it makes me feela lot of punch in a small package! Four out of the top ten categories of motivators reported by employees in my research are forms of praise, and these categories make up the four chapters in Part I: personal praise, written praise, electronic praise, and public praise. Now, you might say, Are these really different types of praise? Dont they all have the same effect? This was my initial thought, too, but I learned that these types of praise are in fact distinct from one another. Praising someone in person means something different to that person than writing him or her a note, and these forms of praise are both different from praising the person in public. To get the maximum impact out of this simple behavior, vary the forms you use, and use them all frequently. Research by Dr. Gerald Graham of Wichita State University supports these observations. In multiple studies, he found that employees preferred personalized, instant recognition from their direct supervisors more than any other kind of motivation. In fact, in another survey of American workers, 63 percent of the respondents ranked a pat on the back as a meaningful incentive. In Grahams studies, employees perceived that manager-initiated rewards for performance were done least often, and that company-initiated rewards for presence (that is, rewards based simply on being in the organization) occurred most often. Dr. Graham concluded, It appears that the techniques that have the greatest motivational impact are practiced the least, even though they are easier and less expensive to use. Grahams study determined the top five motivating techniques reported by employees to be: 1. The manager personally congratulates employees who do a good job. 2. The manager writes personal notes about good performance. 3. The organization uses performance as the basis for promotion. 4. The manager publicly recognizes employees for good performance. 5. The manager holds morale-building meetings to celebrate success. Ideally, you should vary the
Reviews
Review Quotes
"There's a difference between having someone show up for work and bringing out the best thinking and initiative in each person. To do that requires treating employees more as partners, not as subordinates. Being nice isn't just the right thing to do, it's also the economical thing to do." - Seattle Post-Intelligencer
"There's a difference between having someone show up for work and bringing out the best thinking and initiative in each person. To do that requires treating employees more as partners, not as subordinates. Being nice isn't just the right thing to do, it's also the economical thing to do." -Seattle Post-Intelligencer
"Welcome to Bob's World: A place of above-average managers and workers, all committed to personal excellence, good will and, of course, company profits. [This book] details how a little praise goes a long way." - The Philadelphia Inquirer
"The most interesting and inventive business book on the market today . . .a publishing phenomenon." -Training magazine
"Welcome to Bob's World: A place of above-average managers and workers, all committed to personal excellence, good will and, of course, company profits. [This book] details how a little praise goes a long way." -The Philadelphia Inquirer
"The most interesting and inventive business book on the market today . . .a publishing phenomenon." - Training magazine
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, November 2005
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This volume includes hundreds of new ideas and examples of how companies use rewards and recognitions to boost productivity and keep valued employees happy.
Back Cover Copy
"You get the best effort from others not by lighting a fire beneath them, but by building a fire within them." So sums up Bob Nelson about the philosophy of motivation that makes 1001 Ways to Reward Employees the million-copy bestseller that is indispensable for business. Now completely revised and updated, with hundreds of new, real-world examples, 1001 Ways to Reward Employees is a chock-full guide to rewards of every conceivable type for every conceivable situation.
Main Description
Why is 1001 Ways to Reward Employees, with over 1.4 million copies in print, such an extraordinary bestseller? Because a little over ten years ago Bob Nelson took the seeds of an idea and turned it into something indispensable for business. The idea? That it's not a raise that motivates an employee, and it's not a promotion-what really sparks a person to perform are those intangible, unexpected gestures that signify real appreciation for a job well done. Now, after having worked with thousands of organizations in the years since 11001 Ways to Reward. . . was first published, Bob Nelson presents a second edition packed with hundreds of new ideas and examples of how companies are using rewards and recognitions to boost productivity and keep their valued employees happy. Airplane mechanics are rewarded with balloons and pinwheels. Another manager calls his employees' mothers and thanks them for raising such industrious children. There are ideas from the offbeat (The Margarita Award) to the company-wide (a quiet room) to the embarrassingly simple (a hand-written thank you note) to the wacky (the Laugh-a-Day challenge) to the formal (a two-week promotion to special assistant to the president). Each section includes no-cost rewards and low-cost rewards, both public and private, making this new edition an indispensable resource for making the person/achievement/reward equation work.
Main Description
Why is 1001 Ways to Reward Employees , with over 1.4 million copies in print, such an extraordinary bestseller? Because a little over ten years ago Bob Nelson took the seeds of an idea and turned it into something indispensable for business. The idea? That it's not a raise that motivates an employee, and it's not a promotion-what really sparks a person to perform are those intangible, unexpected gestures that signify real appreciation for a job well done. Now, after having worked with thousands of organizations in the years since 1 1001 Ways to Reward . . . was first published, Bob Nelson presents a second edition packed with hundreds of new ideas and examples of how companies are using rewards and recognitions to boost productivity and keep their valued employees happy. Airplane mechanics are rewarded with balloons and pinwheels. Another manager calls his employees' mothers and thanks them for raising such industrious children. There are ideas from the offbeat (The Margarita Award) to the company-wide (a quiet room) to the embarrassingly simple (a hand-written thank you note) to the wacky (the Laugh-a-Day challenge) to the formal (a two-week promotion to special assistant to the president). Each section includes no-cost rewards and low-cost rewards, both public and private, making this new edition an indispensable resource for making the person/achievement/reward equation work.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Bob Nelson presents hundreds of new ideas and examples of how companies are using rewards and recognitions to boost productivity and keep their valued employees happy.
Table of Contents
Day-to-Day Recognitionp. 1
Personal Praise & Recognitionp. 5
Written Praise & Recognitionp. 13
Electronic Praise & Recognitionp. 26
Public Praise & Recognitionp. 31
Informal Intangible Recognitionp. 43
Information, Support & Involvementp. 45
Autonomy & Authorityp. 55
Flexible Work Hours & Time Offp. 64
Learning & Career Developmentp. 75
Manager Availability & Timep. 86
Tangible Recognition & Rewardsp. 95
Outstanding Employee & Achievement Awardsp. 97
Cash, Cash Substitutes & Gift Certificatesp. 115
Nominal Gifts, Merchandise & Foodp. 128
Special Privileges, Perks & Employee Servicesp. 141
Group Recognition, Rewards & Activitiesp. 153
Group Recognition & Rewardsp. 156
Fun, Games & Contestsp. 170
Celebrations, Parties & Special Eventsp. 191
Field Trips & Travelp. 202
Rewards For Specific Achievementsp. 210
Sales Revenuep. 212
Customer Servicep. 229
Employee Suggestionsp. 244
Productivity & Qualityp. 255
Attendance & Safetyp. 263
Formal Organizational Reward Programsp. 270
Multilevel Reward Programs & Point Systemsp. 271
Company Benefits & Perksp. 284
Employee & Company Anniversariesp. 303
Charity & Community Servicep. 314
Company Stock & Ownershipp. 324
Appendixesp. 330
Where to Get Specialty Reward Itemsp. 330
Companies That Arrange Unusual Reward Activitiesp. 339
Incentive Travel Coordinatorsp. 344
Motivational and Incentive Companies and Associationsp. 350
Featured Companiesp. 353
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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