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The beginner's guide to winning the Nobel Prize : a life in science /
Peter C. Doherty.
imprint
New York : Columbia University Press, c2006.
description
xxi, 294 p.
ISBN
0231138962 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York : Columbia University Press, c2006.
isbn
0231138962 (alk. paper)
contents note
The Swedish effect -- The science culture -- The scientific life -- Immunity: a science story -- Personal discoveries and new commitments -- The next American century? -- Through different prisms: science and religion -- Discovering the future -- How to win a Nobel prize.
catalogue key
5880234
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
"Winning a Nobel wasn't what I set out to do with my life, and as far as I was concerned, it was an extraordinarily improbable outcome. Why me?" -- The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Nobel Prize
First Chapter

"Winning a Nobel wasn't what I set out to do with my life, and as far as I was concerned, it was an extraordinarily improbable outcome. Why me?"

Read more from the Introduction to The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Nobel Prize. (pdf)

Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Publishers Weekly on 2006-03-06:
In 1974, Doherty and Rolf Zinkernagel published a paper on T-cells that changed how researchers thought about the immune system. In 1996, they received a Nobel Prize for that work. Here Doherty reflects on his unexpected journey, from veterinary school in Australia to the royal palace in Stockholm. But this book is not a memoir in the strictest sense-it's more like a conversation, full of digressions and anecdotes. Doherty reflects on his life in science, what it means to be a scientist, the difficulty of explaining science to politicians and the importance of everyone understanding how science works. Doherty also does a little to burst the bubble of glory that surrounds the name "Nobel"-many Nobel laureates are so swamped with the consequences of their fame that they can't continue their life's work. Doherty, who is now affiliated with St. Jude's Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., has advice for the aspiring Nobel laureate that ranges from the profound (be prepared to fail) to the head-smackingly obvious (don't die before you get your accolades). Maybe what it means to win a Nobel is that you get your own soapbox: this is Peter Doherty's, which he uses sometimes well (to change the world) and sometimes less well (to examine pet peeves). (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Reviews
Review Quotes
A charmingly homely account of his own unlikely path toward this pinnacle.
"A charmingly homely account of his own unlikely path toward this pinnacle." -- Margaret Wertheim, "Los Angeles Times"
"A charmingly homely account of his own unlikely path toward this pinnacle." -- Margaret Wertheim, Los Angeles Times
A highly readable introduction to the modern world of scientific research.
"A highly readable introduction to the modern world of scientific research." -- Mary Powers, "Commercialappeal.com"
"A highly readable introduction to the modern world of scientific research." -- Mary Powers, Commercialappeal.com
Doherty opens the vault to the world of science.
"Doherty opens the vault to the world of science." -- Nature
Important to any aspiring scientist.
"Important to any aspiring scientist." -- "Bookwatch"
"Important to any aspiring scientist." -- Bookwatch
The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Nobel Prize is an interesting and useful read for up-and-coming scientists.
" The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Nobel Prize is an interesting and useful read for up-and-coming scientists." -- Journal of the American Medical Association
" The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Nobel Prizeis an interesting and useful read for up-and-coming scientists." -- Journal of the American Medical Association
" "The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Nobel Prize" is an interesting and useful read for up-and-coming scientists." -- "The Journal of the American Medical Association"
This extended and amusing memoir does show how the path to a Nobel can be rocky and winding.
"This extended and amusing memoir does show how the path to a Nobel can be rocky and winding." -- Jeff Bairstow, Laser Focus World
This item was reviewed in:
Kirkus Reviews,
Publishers Weekly, March 2006
Booklist, April 2006
Boston Globe, May 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Nobel Prize , Doherty recounts his unlikely path to becoming a Nobel Laureate. Beginning with his humble origins in Australia, he tells how he developed an interest in immunology and describes his award-winning, influential work with Rolf Zinkernagel on T-cells and the nature of immune defense. In prose that is at turns amusing and astute, Doherty reveals how his nonconformist upbringing, sense of being an outsider, and search for different perspectives have shaped his life and work. Doherty offers a rare, insider's look at the realities of being a research scientist. He lucidly explains his own scientific work and how research projects are selected, funded, and organized; the major problems science is trying to solve; and the rewards and pitfalls of a career in scientific research. For Doherty, science still plays an important role in improving the world, and he argues that scientists need to do a better job of making their work more accessible to the public. Throughout the book, Doherty explores the stories of past Nobel winners and considers some of the crucial scientific debates of our time, including the safety of genetically modified foods and the tensions between science and religion. He concludes with some "tips" on how to win a Nobel Prize, including advice on being persistent, generous, and culturally aware, and he stresses the value of evidence. The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Noble Prize is essential reading for anyone interested in a career in science.
Main Description
In The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Nobel Prize, Doherty recounts his unlikely path to becoming a Nobel Laureate. Beginning with his humble origins in Australia, he tells how he developed an interest in immunology and describes his award-winning, influential work with Rolf Zinkernagel on T-cells and the nature of immune defense. In prose that is at turns amusing and astute, Doherty reveals how his nonconformist upbringing, sense of being an outsider, and search for different perspectives have shaped his life and work.Doherty offers a rare, insider's look at the realities of being a research scientist. He lucidly explains his own scientific work and how research projects are selected, funded, and organized; the major problems science is trying to solve; and the rewards and pitfalls of a career in scientific research. For Doherty, science still plays an important role in improving the world, and he argues that scientists need to do a better job of making their work more accessible to the public.Throughout the book, Doherty explores the stories of past Nobel winners and considers some of the crucial scientific debates of our time, including the safety of genetically modified foods and the tensions between science and religion. He concludes with some "tips" on how to win a Nobel Prize, including advice on being persistent, generous, and culturally aware, and he stresses the value of evidence. The Beginner's Guide to Winning the Noble Prizeis essential reading for anyone interested in a career in science.
Table of Contents
The Swedish effectp. 9
The science culturep. 26
This scientific lifep. 57
Immunity : a science storyp. 94
Personal discoveries and new commitmentsp. 140
The next American century?p. 159
Through different prisms : science and religionp. 189
Discovering the futurep. 215
How to win a Nobel Prizep. 238
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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