Catalogue


Think global, fear local : sex, violence, and anxiety in contemporary Japan /
David Leheny.
imprint
Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 2006.
description
xi, 230 p.
ISBN
0801444187 (cloth : alk. paper), 9780801444180 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 2006.
isbn
0801444187 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780801444180 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Fear, norms, and politics in contemporary Japan -- A "vague anxiety" in 1990s Japan -- "Whatever it is, it's bad, so stop it" -- Guidance, protection, and punishment in Japan's child -- Sex laws -- Trust in Japan, not in counterterrorism -- The self-fulfilling afterthought -- Local scapegoats and other unintended consequences.
catalogue key
5868959
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
In 1999, responding to international concerns about the sexual exploitation of children, the Japanese Diet voted unanimously to ban child prostitution and child pornography. Two years later, in the wake of 9/11, Junichiro Koizumi's cabinet radically shifted government counterterrorism policy toward new military solutions, and away from an earlier emphasis on law enforcement. Although they seem unrelated, these two policies reveal the unintended consequences of attempts to enforce international norms at the national level. In Think Global, Fear Local, David Leheny posits that when states abide by international agreements to clamp down on transnational crime and security concerns, they respond not to an amorphous international problem but rather to more deeply held and proximate fears. Although opponents of child prostitution and pornography were primarily concerned about the victimization of children in poor nations by wealthy foreigners, the Japanese law has been largely used to crack down on "compensated dating," in which middle-class Japanese schoolgirls date and sometimes have sex with adults. Many Japanese policymakers viewed these girls as villains, and subsequent legal developments have aimed to constrain teenage sexual activities as well as to punish predatory adults. Likewise, following changes in the country's counterterrorism policy, some Japanese leaders have redefined a host of other threats-especially from North Korea-as "terrorist" menaces requiring a more robust and active Japanese military. Drawing from sources as diverse as parliamentary debate records and contemporary film and literature, Leheny uses these two very different cases to argue that international norms can serve as political tools, allowing states to enhance their coercive authority.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"David Leheny's book vividly illustrates how vague and not-so-vague fear is pervasive in post-Cold War and post-9/11 Japanese society."-Takashi Inoguchi, Chuo University
"David Leheny's brilliant book shows how global norms are transformed in Japan by officials in the law enforcement and security fields who seek expanded state powers to target national problems and offer credible solutions. This analysis reveals the cultural politics through which solutions resonate with and amplify local constructions of threats, anxieties, villains, and scapegoats. Leheny's fascinating analysis at the interface of political science and anthropology makes a compelling case for constructionist approaches to transnationalism."-Kay Warren, Brown University
"Insightful social science is rarely such fun. Think Global, Fear Local reveals how broadly accepted global norms against child prostitution and terrorism get transformed by anxiety-ridden Japanese policy makers into powerful weapons used to attack peripheral, though admittedly vexing, domestic demons. Leheny's wry wit and Runyonesque characterizations make this a delicious romp through the back alleys of contemporary Japan in the quest to learn how 'good norms go bad.' Read this book; you won't be disappointed."-T. J. Pempel, Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
Drawing from sources as diverse as parliamentary debate records and contemporary film and literature, Leheny uses these two very different cases to argue that international norms can serve as political tools, allowing states to enhance their coercive authority.
Main Description
In 1999, responding to international concerns about the sexual exploitation of children, the Japanese Diet voted unanimously to ban child prostitution and child pornography. Two years later, in the wake of 9/11, Junichiro Koizumi's cabinet radically shift
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Japanese Terms and Conventionsp. xiii
List of Abbreviationsp. xv
Fear, Norms, and Politics in Contemporary Japanp. 1
A "Vague Anxiety" in 1990s Japanp. 27
"Whatever It Is, It's Bad, So Stop It"p. 49
Guidance, Protection, and Punishment in Japan's Child Sex Lawsp. 85
Trust in Japan, Not in Counterterrorismp. 115
The Self-Fulfilling Afterthoughtp. 147
Local Scapegoats and Other Unintended Consequencesp. 183
Notesp. 193
Indexp. 221
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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