Catalogue


Violence in late antiquity : perceptions and practices /
edited by H.A. Drake ; co-editors, Emily Albu ... [et al.] ; editorial assistance, Jacob Latham.
imprint
Aldershot, England : Ashgate, c2006.
description
xix, 395 p. : ill., maps, plans ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0754654982 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Aldershot, England : Ashgate, c2006.
isbn
0754654982 (alk. paper)
general note
Based on papers presented at the fifth biennial Conference on Shifting Frontiers in Late Antiquity, held at the Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, March 20-23, 2003.
catalogue key
5863917
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [359]-389) and index.
A Look Inside
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This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, February 2007
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Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
This volume brings together a selection of papers delivered at the fifth biennial "Shifting Frontiers" conference with others specially commissioned for the volume.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Written by H.A. Drake, the chapters in this text focus on: assessing violence in late antiquity; 'legitimate' violence, violence and rhetoric; and religious violence.
Long Description
'Violence' is virtually synonymous in the popular imagination with the period of the Later Roman Empire-a time when waves of barbarian invaders combined with urban mobs and religious zealots to bring an end to centuries of peace and serenity. All of these images come together in the Visigothic sack of the city of Rome in A.D. 410, a date commonly used for the fall of the entire empire. But was this period in fact as violent as it has been portrayed? A new generation of scholars in the field of Late Antiquity has called into question the standard narrative, pointing to evidence of cultural continuity and peaceful interaction between "barbarians" and Romans, Christians and pagans.To assess the state of this question, the fifth biennial 'Shifting Frontiers' conference was devoted to the theme of 'Violence in Late Antiquity'. Conferees addressed aspects of this question from standpoints as diverse as archaeology and rhetoric, anthropology and economics. A selection of the papers then delivered has been prepared for the present volume, along with others commissioned for the purpose and a concluding essay by Martin Zimmerman, reflecting on the theme of the book. The four sections on Defining Violence, 'Legitimate' Violence, Violence and Rhetoric, and Religious Violence are each introduced by a theme essay from a leading scholar in the field. While offering no definitive answer to the question of violence in Late Antiquity, the papers in this volume aim to stimulate a fresh look at this age-old problem.
Main Description
Violence in Late Antiquity brings together a selection of the papers delivered at the fifth biennial 'Shifting Frontiers' conference with others specially commissioned for the volume. The four sections on Defining Violence, 'Legitimate' Violence, Violence and Rhetoric, and Religious Violence are each introduced by a theme essay from a leading scholar in the field. While offering no definitive answer to the question of violence in Late Antiquity, the papers in this volume aim to stimulate a fresh look at this age-old problem, from standpoints as diverse as archaeology and rhetoric, anthropology and economics.
Table of Contents
List of figures
List of tables
List of contributors
List of abbreviations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Gauging violence in late antiquity
Assessing Violence in Late Antiquity: Perceptions of barbarian violence
Violent behavior and the construction of barbarian identity in late antiquity
Violence in the barbarian successor kingdoms
Justifiably outraged or simply outrageous? The Isaurian incident of Ammianus Marcellinus 14.2
The inn as a place of violence and danger in rabbinic literature
A question of faith? Persecution and political centralization in the Sasanian empire of Yazdgard II (438-457 CE)
Legitimate Violence: Violence, victims and the legal tradition in late antiquity
Violence in the process of arrest and imprisonment in late antique Egypt
Coercion, resistance and 'the command economy' in late Roman Aperlae
Making late Roman taxpayers pay: imperial government strategies and practice
Desires of the hangman: Augustine on legitimized violence
Violence, purification and mercy in the late antique afterlife
Exiled bishops in the Christian empire: victims of imperial violence?
Reasoned violence and shifty frontiers: shared victory in the late Roman East
Violence and Rhetoric: Bad boys: circumcellions and fictive violence
Teaching violence in the schools of rhetoric
Doing violence to the image of an empress: the destruction of Eudoxias reputation
The Thessalonian affair in the fifth-century histories
'Kill all the dogs!' or 'Apollonius says!': two stories against punitive violence
Epiphanius of Cyprus and the geography of heresy
Cyclic violence and the poetics of negotiation in pre-Islamic Arabia
Religious Violence: Rethinking Pagan-Christian violence
Bookburning in the Christian Roman empire: Transforming a Pagan rife of purification
Christianizing the rural communities of late Roman Africa: a process of coercion or persuasion?
Hellenic heritage and Christian challenge: conflict over panhellenic sanctuaries in late antiquity
Embodied theologies: Christian identity and violence in Alexandria in the early Arian controversy
The murder of Hypatia: acceptable or unacceptable violence?
Conclusion: Violence in late antiquity reconsidered
Bibliography
Index.
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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