Catalogue


Ulster unionism and the peace process in Northern Ireland /
Christopher Farrington.
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
description
xi, 214 p. ; 23 cm.
ISBN
1403992851 (cloth)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Houndmills, Basingstoke ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2006.
isbn
1403992851 (cloth)
catalogue key
5862133
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 194-207) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Christopher Farrington is a Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Politics and International Relations, University College Dublin, Republic of Ireland
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-12-01:
There are hundreds of books on Northern Ireland, but Farrington (University College, Dublin) surprisingly has found something new to write on: the relationship between Unionism and the Northern Ireland peace process since the 1980s. He discusses a number of intra-Unionist debates but notes that the Unionists substantially agree that the peace process is Nationalist in origin, that Unionists have no sense of ownership, and that Britain has become neutral toward the Union. Where Unionists divide is over whether the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) or the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) can best secure core unionist interests. The long-term majority Unionist party, the UUP, is not able to assure Unionists that its cooperative strategy has led republicans to embrace democratic politics, and the DUP has become the majority Unionist party with power to block anything that most Unionists do not see as a "fair deal." The book is tightly argued and well documented, but it assumes more knowledge of Northern Ireland than even well-informed Americans will have. Outsiders may also have lost interest in the Northern Ireland problem, given much more substantial ethnic and/or religious conflict elsewhere. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Researchers and faculty. A. J. Ward emeritus, College of William and Mary
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, December 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
The politics of Ulster Unionism is central to the success or failure of any political settlement in Northern Ireland. However, current research does not adequately address why Unionists take the political positions that they do nor analyse how they interpret the political situation. This book answers many questions.
Main Description
The politics of Unionism is central to the success or failure of any political settlement in Northern Ireland. The aim of this book is to place the politics of Unionism in its proper historical context and understand its dynamics with relation to its internal structures, including identity, ideology, social structures and political parties; and its external environment, including the policy of the British and Irish governments; its relationship with Irish Nationalists and Irish Nationalismand the wider influences on the peace process such as those of the US, South Africa, and civil society.
Description for Bookstore
The aim of this book is to place the politics of Unionism in its proper historical context and understand its dynamics with relation to its internal structures, including identity, ideology, social structures and political parties; and its external environment, including the policy of the British and Irish governments; its relationship with Irish Nationalists and Irish Nationalism and the wider influences on the peace process such as those of the US, South Africa, and civil society.
Long Description
The politics of Unionism is central to the success or failure of any political settlement in Northern Ireland. The aim of this book is to place the politics of Unionism in its proper historical context and understand its dynamics with relation to its internal structures, including identity, ideology, social structures and political parties; and its external environment, including the policy of the British and Irish governments; its relationship with Irish Nationalists and Irish Nationalism and the wider influences on the peace process such as those of the US, South Africa, and civil society.
Table of Contents
List of Figures and Tablep. vii
Acknowledgementsp. viii
Abbreviationsp. x
Introductionp. 1
The structure of the bookp. 12
The Development of Unionist Ideasp. 14
Who?p. 16
What were they saying?p. 18
The critiquesp. 28
Party political effectsp. 35
Conclusionp. 45
The Challenge of the Anglo-Irish Agreement and the Unionist Responsep. 48
The Unionist withdrawal of consentp. 51
The integration debatep. 61
Devolution and North-South relationsp. 74
Conclusionp. 82
Unionism in Local Governmentp. 85
Local Government politicsp. 86
Unionists political parties and local governmentp. 89
Relationships with nationalismp. 102
Conclusionp. 118
Unionism and the Peace Processp. 120
The Unionist analysis of the peace processp. 122
Consentp. 130
The limits of a settlementp. 137
Conclusionp. 148
Unionism and the Politics of the Agreementp. 150
The politics of the Agreementp. 152
Party politicsp. 162
Conclusionp. 180
Conclusion: Questions of Unityp. 182
Notesp. 190
Bibliographyp. 194
Indexp. 208
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem