Catalogue


Rhetoric and sexuality : the poetry of Hart Crane, Elizabeth Bishop, and James Merrill /
Peter Nickowitz
edition
1st ed
imprint
New York, N.Y. ; Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, c2006
description
178 p. ; 22 cm
ISBN
1403968497 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
New York, N.Y. ; Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, c2006
isbn
1403968497 (hbk.)
catalogue key
5862129
 
Includes bibliographical references and index
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-09-01:
Comparisons of poets' treatments of themes or images are common in literary criticism; a fairly recent example is Guy Rotella's Castings: Monuments and Monumentality in Poems by Elizabeth Bishop, Robert Lowell, James Merrill, Derek Walcott and Seamus Heaney (CH, Nov'04, 42-1428). In this book, Nickowitz (USC and himself a poet) explores the poetry of three US writers in order to "decode" instances of homosexual identification and desire. Although he acknowledges that none of the three was a confessional poets, he approaches their work in the belief that their poems are still ambiguously confessional. Nickowitz views selected poems through the lens of Freudian psychoanalytic theory, drawing as well on the theory of Melanie Klein, to explore the poets' treatment of initiation and identity; the relationship between self and world; and love. Through extraordinarily detailed (but sometimes a bit too prescriptive) close readings of the poems, Nickowitz concludes that the three poets all reveal a desire for enclosure, for safe spaces away from the rest of the world; that their language both reveals and hides their identities; and that their love poems must be read in the light of traditional love poems in order to see what has been left unsaid. Those disinclined toward Freudian approaches to literature may find these readings forced. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. A. E. McKim St. Thomas University
Reviews
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Choice, September 2006
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Summaries
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Rhetoric and Sexuality' explores the poetry of Crane, Bishop and Merrill, employing close readings and the critical lens of Freudian and Kleinian psychoanalysis in order to illustrate a new way to read American poetry.
Description for Bookstore
Rhetoric and Sexualityexplores the poetry of Hart Crane, Elizabeth Bishop, and James Merrill. Nickowitz combines a rhetorical and thematic interpretation, employing close readings and the critical lens of Freudian and Kleinian psychoanalysis, to illustrate an additional way to read American poetry. He argues that the extent to which homosexual desire is problematic for these poets compels them to formulate new ways of expressing issues of homosexuality for which they have no available words.Rhetoric and Sexualityshows that the logic of identity in twentieth-century American poetry becomes a question of rhetoric.
Long Description
"Rhetoric and Sexuality" explores the poetry of Hart Crane, Elizabeth Bishop, and James Merrill. Nickowitz combines a rhetorical and thematic interpretation, employing close readings and the critical lens of Freudian and Kleinian psychoanalysis, to illustrate an additional way to read American poetry. He argues that the extent to which homosexual desire is problematic for these poets compels them to formulate new ways of expressing issues of homosexuality for which they have no available words. "Rhetoric and Sexuality" shows that the logic of identity in twentieth-century American poetry becomes a question of rhetoric.
Main Description
Rhetoric and Sexuality explores the poetry of Hart Crane, Elizabeth Bishop, and James Merrill. Nickowitz combines a rhetorical and thematic interpretation, employing close readings and the critical lens of Freudian and Kleinian psychoanalysis, to illustrate an additional way to read American poetry. He argues that the extent to which homosexual desire is problematic for these poets compels them to formulate new ways of expressing issues of homosexuality for which they have no available words. Rhetoric and Sexuality shows that the logic of identity in twentieth-century American poetry becomes a question of rhetoric.
Unpaid Annotation
Peter Nickowitz explores a trajectory in 20th-century American poetry by examining the work of Crane, Bishop, and Merrill. He combines a rhetorical and thematic interpretation, employing close readings and the critical lens of Freudian and Kleinian psychoanalysis, to illustrate a new way to read American poetry. Arguing that the extent to which homosexual desire is problematic for these poets compels them to formulate new modes of expression to discuss issues of homosexuality for which they have no available words, the book shows that the logic of identity in twentieth-century American poetry becomes a question of rhetoric.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. vi
Introductionp. 1
Chrysalis Unbound: Poems of Origin and Initiationp. 11
Anatomy of a Motherp. 53
Coda: Literary Mothersp. 92
Burnt Matches, or the Art of Lovep. 101
Afterwordp. 145
Notesp. 151
Bibliographyp. 169
Indexp. 175
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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