Catalogue


Building with nature : inspiration for the arts & crafts home /
Leslie M. Freudenheim.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Salt Lake City : Gibbs Smith, c2005.
description
xii, 229 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
ISBN
1586854631
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Salt Lake City : Gibbs Smith, c2005.
isbn
1586854631
catalogue key
5861928
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [212]-216) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Excerpt from Book
In 1967, when Elisabeth Sussman and I began our research into the sources of early California architecture, we joined a small group of pioneers whose work was effectively carving out a new field of American architectural history. Esther McCoy's groundbreaking Five California Architects, Harold Kirker's significant and classic California's Architectural Frontier, David Gebhard's exhibition catalogue Architecture in California 1868-1968, Sally Woodbridge's Buildings of the Bay Region Area, and Roger Olmsted and T. H. Watkins' Here Today-these became the seminal texts in the field. Their precursor, Elisabeth Kendall Thompson's significant article "The Early Domestic Architecture of the San Francisco Bay Region" (1951-52), turned out to be prophetic for us, as Thompson alerted us to the possibility that Reverend Joseph Worcester of the Swedenborgian Church in San Francisco may have played a major role in the architectural development of the region from 1876 to 1915. It has been enormously gratifying to note the outpouring of further research in the field since we published Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition in 1974. Numerous articles and books have advanced the impressive augmentation to our understanding of California's architecture and its role in the Arts & Crafts movement, moving a relatively obscure area of interest into the mainstream of American architectural, intellectual, and social history. This book contains many new photographs that did not appear in the 1974 book, some of which have not been published since 1902. For example, we have included a view of Joseph Worcester's Russian Hill living room, showing the end with the bay windows that looked over the Golden Gate; Charles F. Lummis published the photograph with an incorrect caption (although he labeled the back of the photo itself properly) so that it remained unrecognized until William Kostura kindly drew my attention to it.
Flap Copy
Much has been written about the Arts & Crafts spirit of Californians, their appreciation of the land, their desire to build simple yet interesting houses that connect with the outdoors (sleeping porches, gardens, verandas, terraces, and so on), and their love of natural building materials. This revised edition of a foundation classic focuses on the beginnings (1865 and on) of environmentalism and Arts & Crafts collaboration in California, and the origins of the trend toward building simple rustic homes in harmony with nature. Freudenheim and Sussman explore how and why a small, influential group of Californians (including Joseph Worcester, Bernard Maybeck, Charles Keeler, William Keith, Charles Lummis, A. Page Brown, and others)--all of whom had come from the East or from England--were especially devoted to Ruskin and the Arts & Crafts and how this combined with their dedication to preserve California's natural beauty to create a unique architectural movement. Building with Nature: Development of the California Arts & Crafts Home presents some revolutionary ideas, including exciting new material on the San Francisco Swedenborgian Church, now a National Landmark and considered to be the model for several lines of Mission-style furniture; new information on the architectural development of Russian hill; and the similarities and differences of the almost simultaneous development of the Arts & Crafts movements in England and the Bay Area. Freudenheim examines how Worcester and his circle encouraged less materialism through architecture that complemented a simpler life in tune with nature, and includes letters from Worcester to his cousin, architect Daniel H. Burnham, along with previously unpublished original documents relating to architectural developments in the Bay Area at the turn of the century. Leslie Freudenheim, with coauthor Elisabeth Sussman, did pioneering research on the Arts & Crafts movement and its architectural manifestations in the San Francisco Bay region. This collaboration resulted in the publication of Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition (Gibbs Smith, Publisher, 1974). Subsequently, Freudenheim continued her work in architectural history. She wrote a weekly column on architecture and urban affairs for the Baltimore Sun, and contributed to the Washington Post and Museum News. Thereafter she served as Editor of Federal Design Matters for the Design Department, National Endowment for the Arts, and while living in Berlin (1999-2000) wrote on art and architecture for DieWelt and Art News. Since 2001 she has returned to studying the architectural and social roots of the Arts & Crafts movement in California. Freudenheim lives in Washington, D.C. Elisabeth Sussman is a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Her recent exhibitions and catalogues include Eva Hesse: A Retrospective and Diane Arbus: Revelations (both originated at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art). Sussman lives in New York City.
Flap Copy
Much has been written about the Arts & Crafts spirit of Californians, their appreciation of the land, their desire to build simple yet interesting houses that connect with the outdoors (sleeping porches, gardens, verandas, terraces, and so on), and their love of natural building materials. This revised edition of a foundation classic focuses on the beginnings (1865 and on) of environmentalism and Arts & Crafts collaboration in California, and the origins of the trend toward building simple rustic homes in harmony with nature.Freudenheim and Sussman explore how and why a small, influential group of Californians (including Joseph Worcester, Bernard Maybeck, Charles Keeler, William Keith, Charles Lummis, A. Page Brown, and others)--all of whom had come from the East or from England--were especially devoted to Ruskin and the Arts & Crafts and how this combined with their dedication to preserve California's natural beauty to create a unique architectural movement.Building with Nature: Development of the California Arts & Crafts Home presents some revolutionary ideas, including exciting new material on the San Francisco Swedenborgian Church, now a National Landmark and considered to be the model for several lines of Mission-style furniture; new information on the architectural development of Russian hill; and the similarities and differences of the almost simultaneous development of the Arts & Crafts movements in England and the Bay Area. Freudenheim examines how Worcester and his circle encouraged less materialism through architecture that complemented a simpler life in tune with nature, and includes letters from Worcester to his cousin, architect Daniel H. Burnham, along with previously unpublished original documents relating to architectural developments in the Bay Area at the turn of the century. Leslie Freudenheim, with coauthor Elisabeth Sussman, did pioneering research on the Arts & Crafts movement and its architectural manifestations in the San Francisco Bay region. This collaboration resulted in the publication of Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition (Gibbs Smith, Publisher, 1974). Subsequently, Freudenheim continued her work in architectural history. She wrote a weekly column on architecture and urban affairs for the Baltimore Sun, and contributed to the Washington Post and Museum News. Thereafter she served as Editor of Federal Design Matters for the Design Department, National Endowment for the Arts, and while living in Berlin (1999-2000) wrote on art and architecture for DieWelt and Art News. Since 2001 she has returned to studying the architectural and social roots of the Arts & Crafts movement in California. Freudenheim lives in Washington, D.C.Elisabeth Sussman is a curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Her recent exhibitions and catalogues include Eva Hesse: A Retrospective and Diane Arbus: Revelations (both originated at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art). Sussman lives in New York City.
First Chapter

In 1967, when Elisabeth Sussman and I began our research into the sources of early California architecture, we joined a small group of pioneers whose work was effectively carving out a new field of American architectural history. Esther McCoy's groundbreaking Five California Architects, Harold Kirker's significant and classic California's Architectural Frontier, David Gebhard's exhibition catalogue Architecture in California 1868-1968, Sally Woodbridge's Buildings of the Bay Region Area, and Roger Olmsted and T. H. Watkins' Here Today-these became the seminal texts in the field. Their precursor, Elisabeth Kendall Thompson's significant article "The Early Domestic Architecture of the San Francisco Bay Region" (1951-52), turned out to be prophetic for us, as Thompson alerted us to the possibility that Reverend Joseph Worcester of the Swedenborgian Church in San Francisco may have played a major role in the architectural development of the region from 1876 to 1915.

It has been enormously gratifying to note the outpouring of further research in the field since we published Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition in 1974. Numerous articles and books have advanced the impressive augmentation to our understanding of California's architecture and its role in the Arts & Crafts movement, moving a relatively obscure area of interest into the mainstream of American architectural, intellectual, and social history.

This book contains many new photographs that did not appear in the 1974 book, some of which have not been published since 1902. For example, we have included a view of Joseph Worcester's Russian Hill living room, showing the end with the bay windows that looked over the Golden Gate; Charles F. Lummis published the photograph with an incorrect caption (although he labeled the back of the photo itself properly) so that it remained unrecognized until William Kostura kindly drew my attention to it.

Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, May 2006
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Summaries
Main Description
This new edition of the classic, Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition, focuses on the beginnings (1865 and on) of the Bay Area shingle style and Arts & Crafts collaboration in California, and the origins of the trend toward building simple rustic homes in harmony with nature. Freudenheim explores how and why a small, influential group of Californians (including Joseph Worcester, Bernard Maybeck, Charles Keeler, William Keith, Charles Lummis, A. Page Brown, and others)--all of whom had come from the East or from England--were especially devoted to Ruskin and the Arts & Crafts style and how this combined with their dedication to California's natural beauty to create a unique architectural movement.
Long Description
Much has been said about the Arts & Crafts spirit of Californians, their appreciation of the land, their desire to build "simple" yet interesting houses that connect with the outdoors (sleeping porches, gardens, verandas, terraces, and so on), and their love of wilderness areas. This new edition of the classic, Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition, focuses on the beginnings (1865 and on) of the Bay Area shingle style and Arts & Crafts collaboration in California, and the origins of the trend toward building simple rustic homes in harmony with nature. Freudenheim explores how and why a small, influential group of Californians (including Joseph Worcester, Bernard Maybeck, Charles Keeler, William Keith, Charles Lummis, A. Page Brown, and others)--all of whom had come from the East or from England--were especially devoted to Ruskin and the Arts & Crafts style and how this combined with their dedication to California's natural beauty to create a unique architectural movement. Building with Nature: The Development of the California Arts and Crafts Home presents some revolutionary ideas, including exciting new material on the San Francisco Swedenborgian Church, now a National Landmark and considered to be the model for several lines of Mission-Style furniture; new information on the architectural development of Russian Hill; and the similarities and differences of the almost simultaneous development of the Arts & Crafts movements in England and in the Bay Area. Freudenheim examines how Worcester and his circle encouraged less materialism through architecture that complemented a simpler life in tune with nature, and includes letters from Worcester to his cousin, architect Daniel H. Burnham, along with previously unpublished original documents relating to architectural developments in the Bay Area at the turn of the century. Leslie Freudenheim is the coauthor of Building with Nature: Roots of the San Francisco Bay Region Tradition (Gibbs Smith, Publisher, 1974). Freudenheim has continued to work on architectural history and related areas, and has been published in the Baltimore Sun and the Washington Post. She also served as editor of Federal Design Matters for the Design Department, National Endowment for the Arts. Since 2002 she has returned to studying Arts & Crafts homes and the architectural and social roots of this movement.
Bowker Data Service Summary
'Architecture is Elementary' is a self-instruction text that concisely and coherently discusses the principles of architectural design.
Main Description
Much has been said about the Arts & Crafts spirit of Californians, their appreciation of the land, their desire to build "simple" yet interesting houses that connect with the outdoors and their love of wilderness areas. Leslie Freudenheim explores the beginnings of environmentalism and Arts & Crafts collaboration in California and the trend toward building simple rustic homes in harmony with nature. This beautifully illustrated book was originally published 30 years ago.
Table of Contents
Introduction 2004 Setting the Scene
A Very Influential 1876 Brown Shingle, Redwood Interior, Rustic Suburban House and Its Extraordinary Owner
Russian Hill: An Early Arts & Crafts Neighborhood
A National Landmark, Arts & Crafts Building in San Francisco: The Swedenborgian Church
Transition in the Bay Region: Willis Polk and Ernest Coxhead
Development of the Simple Home: Bernard Maybeck and Charles Keeler
Early Environmentalists: Veneration and Exploitation and The Hillside Club
A Wizard Influences Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley: John Galen Howard Continues the Arts & Crafts Shingle Tradition
Expanding the Arts & Crafts Concept: A Plethora of Vernacular Sources- Barn, Mission, Pueblo, English Arts & Crafts Cottages-and Contact with Secessionist and Other Modern Movements Begins
Arts & Crafts Expands into the Popular Mission and Mediterranean Styles in the Early Twentieth Century
A Note on the Sources
Abbreviations and Endnotes
Bibliography
Index
Acknowledgments 2004
Acknowledgments 1974
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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