Catalogue

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Boston modern : figurative expressionism as alternative modernism /
Judith Bookbinder.
edition
1st ed.
imprint
Durham, N.H. : University of New Hampshire Press ; Hanover : University Press of New England, c2005.
description
x, 372 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
ISBN
1584654880 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Durham, N.H. : University of New Hampshire Press ; Hanover : University Press of New England, c2005.
isbn
1584654880 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
"The new heroism" : Karl Zerbe's beginnings, the German avant-garde, and 'Entartete Kunst' in Boston -- Immigrant childhoods : the education of Hyman Bloom and Jack Levine -- Society as a morality play : Jack Levine's view of the world -- Mystery and materiality : Hyman Bloom's spiritual renderings -- Teaching by example : Karl Zerbe's painting and pedagogy -- Challenging established assumptions : David Aronson, other museum school students, and the debate at the Institute of Contemporary Art -- Reestablishing roots : Aronson, Guston, and a renewed figurative expressionist debate -- Conclusion : figurative expressionism beyond Boston.
catalogue key
5861515
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [331]-353) and index.
A Look Inside
About the Author
Author Affiliation
Judith Bookbinder teaches art history at Boston College
First Chapter
"In Boston Modern, Judith Bookbinder firmly establishes Boston figurative expressionism as an integral part of American modernism, one that presents an alternative approach to the trajectory of abstraction in the turbulent decades bracketing the Second World War. The works of the movement's most remarkable artists boldly confront issues of personal and group identity in the modern world; consider the role of the artist as witness to violence, prejudice, and corruption in modern society; and intricately reinterpret the nature of the creative process and its formal and spatial implications. Within Boston's unique and surprisingly receptive Anglo-Saxon and academic tradition, Karl Zerbe, Hyman Bloom, Jack Levine, David Aronson, Philip Guston, and others, many of whom were Jewish immigrants from eastern Europe or their children, struggled to clarify their identities as outsiders in an insider's world and as modern artists. Although at first critically and popularly well received throughout the country, Boston figurative expressionists were increasingly marginalized by the development of abstract modernism centered in New York." "However, giving voice to the ethos of a community in flux, the movement continues to inspire artists today. The vibrant dialogue the group established between their individual perspectives and the aesthetic conventions taught at Boston's academic institutions is here at last given the prominent treatment it deserves. Boston Modern definitively challenges widely accepted notions of modernist discourse in American art history."--BOOK JACKET.
Reviews
Review Quotes
"[Bookbinder] punctuates this history with thoughtful analyses of individual artworks . . . she tells an interesting story about the role of institutions and formal education in American cultural history and makes an important contribution to this history."--The New England Quarterly
"[Bookbinder] punctuates this history with thoughtful analyses of individual artworks . . . she tells an interesting story about the role of institutions and formal education in American cultural history and makes an important contribution to this history."Ă‘The New England Quarterly
"Judith Bookbinder has delivered the first comprehensive study of its kind. Richly documented and lucidly written, Boston Modern is erudite and beautifully synthesizing at once. It fills a scholarly gap in the history of modernism and brings to life a regional legacy whose sources and significance extend far beyond regionalism."
"Judith Bookbinder has delivered the first comprehensive study of its kind. Richly documented and lucidly written, Boston Modern is erudite and beautifully synthesizing at once. It fills a scholarly gap in the history of modernism and brings to life a regional legacy whose sources and significance extend far beyond regionalism." -- Asher D. Biemann, University of Virginia
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Main Description
In Boston Modern, Judith Bookbinder firmly establishes Boston figurative expressionism as an integral part of American modernism, one that presents an alternative approach to the trajectory of abstract art in the turbulent decades bracketing the Second World War. The works of the movement's most remarkable artists boldly confront issues of personal and group identity in the modern world, consider the role of the artist as witness to violence, prejudice, and corruption in modern society, and intricately reinterpret the nature of the creative process and its formal and spatial implications. Within Boston's unique and surprisingly receptive Anglo-Saxon and academic tradition, Karl Zerbe, Hyman Bloom, Jack Levine, David Aronson, Philip Guston, and others, many of whom were Jewish immigrants from eastern Europe or their children, struggled to clarify their identities as outsiders in an insider's world and as modern artists. Although at first critically and popularly well received throughout the country, Boston figurative expressionists were increasingly marginalized by the development of abstract modernism centered in New York. However, by giving voice to the ethos of a community in flux, the movement continues to inspire artists today. The vibrant dialogue the group established between their individual perspectives and the aesthetic conventions taught at Boston's academic institutions is here at last given the prominent treatment it deserves. Lavishly illustrated and skillfully presented, Boston Modern definitively challenges widely accepted notions of modernist discourse in American art history.
Unpaid Annotation
In this illustrated book, that challenges accepted notions of modernist discourse in American art history, the author establishes Boston figurative expressionism as an integral part of American modernism, one that presents an alternative approach to the trajectory of abstract art in the turbulent decades bracketing the Second World War.
Table of Contents
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
Introductionp. 1
"The New Heroism": Karl Zerbe's Beginnings, the German Avant-Garde, and Entartete Kunst in Bostonp. 29
Immigrant Childhoods: The Education of Hyman Bloom and Jack Levinep. 57
Society as a Morality Play: Jack Levine's View of the Worldp. 90
Mystery and Materiality: Hyman Bloom's Spiritual Renderingsp. 125
Teaching by Example: Karl Zerbe's Painting and Pedagogyp. 161
Challenging Established Assumptions: David Aronson, Other Museum School Students, and the Debate at the Institute of Contemporary Artp. 193
Reestablishing Roots: Aronson, Guston, and a Renewed Figurative Expressionist Debatep. 232
Conclusion: Figurative Expressionism beyond Bostonp. 271
Notesp. 275
Bibliographyp. 331
Indexp. 355
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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