Catalogue


Policing America : methods, issues, challenges /
Kenneth J. Peak.
edition
5th ed.
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Pearson/Prentice Hall, c2006.
description
xxvii, 480 p. : ill., map ; 26 cm.
ISBN
013118864X
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Pearson/Prentice Hall, c2006.
isbn
013118864X
catalogue key
5851776
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
This fifth edition ofPolicing America, more than its predecessors, reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day.The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this edition, as well as what the police are doing to prevent ? and react to ? any future attacks. Like its forerunners, however, this edition is my best attempt to inform the reader, to the fullest extent possible, of what it is like to wear a police uniform. Because the author brings more than 34 years of both scholarly and policing backgrounds to this effort, the chapters contain a ?real world? flavor not found in most policing textbooks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing.New materials have been added throughout, especially with regard to terrorism, three eras of community policing, mitochondrial DNA, crimes against children, cold cases, policing in Iraq, new technologies in research and development, and recent court decisions (other nuances are listed below).Meanwhile, this edition continues to provide updated material and in-dept coverage of such topics as patrol, the police subculture, accountability, civil liability, extraordinary problems and practices, the rule of law, investigations, organization and administration, policing in selected foreign venues, and policing in the future. Disseminated throughout the book are several ?Practitioner's Perspectives?--short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing. There are other pedagogical attributes as well. To continue my attempt to make this textbook more reader-friendly, each chapter in this edition begins with a listing of its key items and concepts and an overview of the chapter(each key term is bolded the first time it is used in the chapter). The textbook also includes "Items for Review," and "Independent Student Activities," and "Related Web Sites" at the end of each chapter. It is recommended that the reader examine the review items after reading each chapter in order to get a feel for how well the chapter's are understood. The independent activities and Web sites are also intended to enhance the reader's understanding of the applied aspects of policing.Other instructional aids include the aforementioned "Practitioner's Perspectives," tables and figures, and boxes with recent news items. Finally, a detailed index at the end of the book facilitates the reader's ability to locate specific topics more quickly. [ An Instructor's Manual/Test Bank is also available for classroom instructors using this textbook.]From its introduction, by * * * * * *, through the final chapter, the reader is provided with a penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult and challenging occupations in America. Chapter Organization and Overview Chapter 1 discusses the history of policing, and Chapter 2 examines the contemporary status of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies; here the focus is on the federal agencies, which have been reorganized in major fashion since the creation of Homeland Security. Chapter 3 examines the police subculture and how ordinary citizens are socialized to the role. The next chapter considers how police agencies are organized and administered and how administrators, middle managers, and supervisors perform their functions. Chapter 5 explores the very important function of patrolling and including its methods and menaces. Chapter 6 focuses on a rapidly spreading form of policing that is being embraced by thousands of police agencies across the United States and around the world: community oriented policing and problem solvi
Introduction or Preface
This fifth edition ofPolicing America, more than its predecessors, reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day.The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this edition, as well as what the police are doing to prevent - and react to - any future attacks.Like its forerunners, however, this edition is my best attempt to inform the reader, to the fullest extent possible, of what it is like to wear a police uniform. Because the author brings more than 34 years of both scholarly and policing backgrounds to this effort, the chapters contain a "real world" flavor not found in most policing textbooks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing.New materials have been added throughout, especially with regard to terrorism, three eras of community policing, mitochondrial DNA, crimes against children, cold cases, policing in Iraq, new technologies in research and development, and recent court decisions (other nuances are listed below).Meanwhile, this edition continues to provide updated material and in-dept coverage of such topics as patrol, the police subculture, accountability, civil liability, extraordinary problems and practices, the rule of law, investigations, organization and administration, policing in selected foreign venues, and policing in the future. Disseminated throughout the book are several "Practitioner's Perspectives"--short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing.There are other pedagogical attributes as well. To continue my attempt to make this textbook more reader-friendly, each chapter in this edition begins with a listing of its key items and concepts and an overview of the chapter(each key term is bolded the first time it is used in the chapter). The textbook also includes "Items for Review," and "Independent Student Activities," and "Related Web Sites" at the end of each chapter. It is recommended that the reader examine the review items after reading each chapter in order to get a feel for how well the chapter's are understood. The independent activities and Web sites are also intended to enhance the reader's understanding of the applied aspects of policing.Other instructional aids include the aforementioned "Practitioner's Perspectives," tables and figures, and boxes with recent news items. Finally, a detailed index at the end of the book facilitates the reader's ability to locate specific topics more quickly. [ An Instructor's Manual/Test Bank is also available for classroom instructors using this textbook.]From its introduction, by * * * * * *, through the final chapter, the reader is provided with a penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult and challenging occupations in America. Chapter Organization and OverviewChapter 1 discusses the history of policing, and Chapter 2 examines the contemporary status of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies; here the focus is on the federal agencies, which have been reorganized in major fashion since the creation of Homeland Security. Chapter 3 examines the police subculture and how ordinary citizens are socialized to the role. The next chapter considers how police agencies are organized and administered and how administrators, middle managers, and supervisors perform their functions. Chapter 5 explores the very important function of patrolling and including its methods and menaces.Chapter 6 focuses on a rapidly spreading form of policing that is being embraced by thousands of police agencies across the United States and around the world: community oriented policing and problem solvi
Introduction or Preface
This fifth edition of Policing America , more than its predecessors, reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this edition, as well as what the police are doing to prevent - and react to - any future attacks. Like its forerunners, however, this edition is my best attempt to inform the reader, to the fullest extent possible, of what it is like to wear a police uniform. Because the author brings more than 34 years of both scholarly and policing backgrounds to this effort, the chapters contain a "real world" flavor not found in most policing textbooks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. New materials have been added throughout, especially with regard to terrorism, three eras of community policing, mitochondrial DNA, crimes against children, cold cases, policing in Iraq, new technologies in research and development, and recent court decisions (other nuances are listed below). Meanwhile, this edition continues to provide updated material and in-dept coverage of such topics as patrol, the police subculture, accountability, civil liability, extraordinary problems and practices, the rule of law, investigations, organization and administration, policing in selected foreign venues, and policing in the future. Disseminated throughout the book are several "Practitioner''s Perspectives"--short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing. There are other pedagogical attributes as well. To continue my attempt to make this textbook more reader-friendly, each chapter in this edition begins with a listing of its key items and concepts and an overview of the chapter (each key term is bolded the first time it is used in the chapter). The textbook also includes "Items for Review," and "Independent Student Activities," and "Related Web Sites" at the end of each chapter. It is recommended that the reader examine the review items after reading each chapter in order to get a feel for how well the chapter''s are understood. The independent activities and Web sites are also intended to enhance the reader''s understanding of the applied aspects of policing. Other instructional aids include the aforementioned "Practitioner''s Perspectives," tables and figures, and boxes with recent news items. Finally, a detailed index at the end of the book facilitates the reader''s ability to locate specific topics more quickly. [ An Instructor''s Manual/Test Bank is also available for classroom instructors using this textbook.] From its introduction, by * * * * * *, through the final chapter, the reader is provided with a penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult and challenging occupations in America. Chapter Organization and Overview Chapter 1 discusses the history of policing, and Chapter 2 examines the contemporary status of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies; here the focus is on the federal agencies, which have been reorganized in major fashion since the creation of Homeland Security. Chapter 3 examines the police subculture and how ordinary citizens are socialized to the role. The next chapter considers how police agencies are organized and administered and how administrators, middle managers, and supervisors perform their functions. Chapter 5 explores the very important function of patrolling and including its methods and menaces. Chapter 6 focuses on a rapidly spreading form of policing that is being embraced by thousands of police agencies across the United States and around the world: community oriented policing and problem solving--COPPS. Chapter 7 focuses on criminal investigation, including the highly progressive fields of forensic science and criminalistics, and Chapter 8 looks at several extraordinary police problems and methods with regard to policing terrorism, hate crimes, the mafia; gangs; and the nation''s borders. The "rule of law" is discussed in Chapter 9, which delineates the constitutional guidelines that direct and constrain police actions. Chapter 10 looks at police accountability to the public, including the issues of police ethics, use of force, and corruption. Police civil liability is examined in Chapter 11. Chapter 12 describes a number of trends and issues, including rights of police officers, women and minorities in policing, the private police, unionization, contract and consolidated policing, civilianization and accreditation of police agencies, higher education for police, and police stress. Then, to better understand policing in this country, Chapter 13 analyzes policing in five international venues: Iraq, Saudi Arabia, China, Northern Ireland, and Mexico. Interpol, the international crime-fighting organization, is also discussed. Chapter 14 examines contemporary police technology, including the myriad uses of computers, electronics, and imaging and communications systems. The development of less-lethal weapons, firearms and other tools are also discussed. Finally, Chapter 15 looks at the police of the future, with emphasis placed on new technologies that could dramatically affect police operations and training. Two appendices, concerning careers in policing and the Police Corps. Taken in sum, the text provides the reader with a comprehensive and penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult, challenging, and obscure occupations in America. Acknowledgments This edition, like its three predecessors, is the result of the professional assistance of several practitioners and publishing people at Prentice Hall. First, I continue to benefit from my friendships and professional associations with Frank Mortimer, Executive Editor, Sarah Holle, Associate Editor and Production Editor, Brian Hyland. The author also wishes to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of the following reviewers * * * * * * * * * * * . Their reviews of this firth edition resulted in many beneficial changes. Also, Michael Goo, Washoe County (Nevada) Sheriff''s Office, provided photographic assistance.
Introduction or Preface
This fifth edition of Policing America , more than its predecessors, reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this edition, as well as what the police are doing to prevent - and react to - any future attacks. Like its forerunners, however, this edition is my best attempt to inform the reader, to the fullest extent possible, of what it is like to wear a police uniform. Because the author brings more than 34 years of both scholarly and policing backgrounds to this effort, the chapters contain a "real world" flavor not found in most policing textbooks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. New materials have been added throughout, especially with regard to terrorism, three eras of community policing, mitochondrial DNA, crimes against children, cold cases, policing in Iraq, new technologies in research and development, and recent court decisions (other nuances are listed below). Meanwhile, this edition continues to provide updated material and in-dept coverage of such topics as patrol, the police subculture, accountability, civil liability, extraordinary problems and practices, the rule of law, investigations, organization and administration, policing in selected foreign venues, and policing in the future. Disseminated throughout the book are several "Practitioner''s Perspectives"--short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing. There are other pedagogical attributes as well. To continue my attempt to make this textbook more reader-friendly, each chapter in this edition begins with a listing of its key items and concepts and an overview of the chapter (each key term is bolded the first time it is used in the chapter). The textbook also includes “Items for Review,” and “Independent Student Activities,” and “Related Web Sites” at the end of each chapter. It is recommended that the reader examine the review items after reading each chapter in order to get a feel for how well the chapter''s are understood. The independent activities and Web sites are also intended to enhance the reader''s understanding of the applied aspects of policing. Other instructional aids include the aforementioned “Practitioner''s Perspectives,” tables and figures, and boxes with recent news items. Finally, a detailed index at the end of the book facilitates the reader''s ability to locate specific topics more quickly. [ An Instructor''s Manual/Test Bank is also available for classroom instructors using this textbook.] From its introduction, by * * * * * *, through the final chapter, the reader is provided with a penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult and challenging occupations in America. Chapter Organization and Overview Chapter 1 discusses the history of policing, and Chapter 2 examines the contemporary status of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies; here the focus is on the federal agencies, which have been reorganized in major fashion since the creation of Homeland Security. Chapter 3 examines the police subculture and how ordinary citizens are socialized to the role. The next chapter considers how police agencies are organized and administered and how administrators, middle managers, and supervisors perform their functions. Chapter 5 explores the very important function of patrolling and including its methods and menaces. Chapter 6 focuses on a rapidly spreading form of policing that is being embraced by thousands of police agencies across the United States and around the world: community oriented policing and problem solving--COPPS. Chapter 7 focuses on criminal investigation, including the highly progressive fields of forensic science and criminalistics, and Chapter 8 looks at several extraordinary police problems and methods with regard to policing terrorism, hate crimes, the mafia; gangs; and the nation''s borders. The “rule of law” is discussed in Chapter 9, which delineates the constitutional guidelines that direct and constrain police actions. Chapter 10 looks at police accountability to the public, including the issues of police ethics, use of force, and corruption. Police civil liability is examined in Chapter 11. Chapter 12 describes a number of trends and issues, including rights of police officers, women and minorities in policing, the private police, unionization, contract and consolidated policing, civilianization and accreditation of police agencies, higher education for police, and police stress. Then, to better understand policing in this country, Chapter 13 analyzes policing in five international venues: Iraq, Saudi Arabia, China, Northern Ireland, and Mexico. Interpol, the international crime-fighting organization, is also discussed. Chapter 14 examines contemporary police technology, including the myriad uses of computers, electronics, and imaging and communications systems. The development of less-lethal weapons, firearms and other tools are also discussed. Finally, Chapter 15 looks at the police of the future, with emphasis placed on new technologies that could dramatically affect police operations and training. Two appendices, concerning careers in policing and the Police Corps. Taken in sum, the text provides the reader with a comprehensive and penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult, challenging, and obscure occupations in America. Acknowledgments This edition, like its three predecessors, is the result of the professional assistance of several practitioners and publishing people at Prentice Hall. First, I continue to benefit from my friendships and professional associations with Frank Mortimer, Executive Editor, Sarah Holle, Associate Editor and Production Editor, Brian Hyland. The author also wishes to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of the following reviewers * * * * * * * * * * * . Their reviews of this firth edition resulted in many beneficial changes. Also, Michael Goo, Washoe County (Nevada) Sheriff''s Office, provided photographic assistance.
First Chapter

This fifth edition of Policing America, more than its predecessors, reflects the changing times in which we live and the tremendous challenges facing law enforcement officers each day. The specter of terrorism and our resulting emphasis on homeland security loom large throughout this edition, as well as what the police are doing to prevent - and react to - any future attacks.

Like its forerunners, however, this edition is my best attempt to inform the reader, to the fullest extent possible, of what it is like to wear a police uniform. Because the author brings more than 34 years of both scholarly and policing backgrounds to this effort, the chapters contain a "real world" flavor not found in most policing textbooks. This text provides a highly practical yet comprehensive view of the largely misunderstood, often obscure world of policing. New materials have been added throughout, especially with regard to terrorism, three eras of community policing, mitochondrial DNA, crimes against children, cold cases, policing in Iraq, new technologies in research and development, and recent court decisions (other nuances are listed below). Meanwhile, this edition continues to provide updated material and in-dept coverage of such topics as patrol, the police subculture, accountability, civil liability, extraordinary problems and practices, the rule of law, investigations, organization and administration, policing in selected foreign venues, and policing in the future. Disseminated throughout the book are several "Practitioner's Perspectives"—short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing.

There are other pedagogical attributes as well. To continue my attempt to make this textbook more reader-friendly, each chapter in this edition begins with a listing of its key items and concepts and an overview of the chapter (each key term is bolded the first time it is used in the chapter). The textbook also includes "Items for Review," and "Independent Student Activities," and "Related Web Sites" at the end of each chapter. It is recommended that the reader examine the review items after reading each chapter in order to get a feel for how well the chapter's are understood. The independent activities and Web sites are also intended to enhance the reader's understanding of the applied aspects of policing. Other instructional aids include the aforementioned "Practitioner's Perspectives," tables and figures, and boxes with recent news items. Finally, a detailed index at the end of the book facilitates the reader's ability to locate specific topics more quickly. [ An Instructor's Manual/Test Bank is also available for classroom instructors using this textbook.]

From its introduction, by * * * * * *, through the final chapter, the reader is provided with a penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult and challenging occupations in America.

Chapter Organization and Overview

Chapter 1 discusses the history of policing, and Chapter 2 examines the contemporary status of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies; here the focus is on the federal agencies, which have been reorganized in major fashion since the creation of Homeland Security. Chapter 3 examines the police subculture and how ordinary citizens are socialized to the role. The next chapter considers how police agencies are organized and administered and how administrators, middle managers, and supervisors perform their functions. Chapter 5 explores the very important function of patrolling and including its methods and menaces.

Chapter 6 focuses on a rapidly spreading form of policing that is being embraced by thousands of police agencies across the United States and around the world: community oriented policing and problem solving—COPPS. Chapter 7 focuses on criminal investigation, including the highly progressive fields of forensic science and criminalistics, and Chapter 8 looks at several extraordinary police problems and methods with regard to policing terrorism, hate crimes, the mafia; gangs; and the nation's borders. The "rule of law" is discussed in Chapter 9, which delineates the constitutional guidelines that direct and constrain police actions. Chapter 10 looks at police accountability to the public, including the issues of police ethics, use of force, and corruption.

Police civil liability is examined in Chapter 11. Chapter 12 describes a number of trends and issues, including rights of police officers, women and minorities in policing, the private police, unionization, contract and consolidated policing, civilianization and accreditation of police agencies, higher education for police, and police stress. Then, to better understand policing in this country, Chapter 13 analyzes policing in five international venues: Iraq, Saudi Arabia, China, Northern Ireland, and Mexico. Interpol, the international crime-fighting organization, is also discussed.

Chapter 14 examines contemporary police technology, including the myriad uses of computers, electronics, and imaging and communications systems. The development of less-lethal weapons, firearms and other tools are also discussed. Finally, Chapter 15 looks at the police of the future, with emphasis placed on new technologies that could dramatically affect police operations and training. Two appendices, concerning careers in policing and the Police Corps.

Taken in sum, the text provides the reader with a comprehensive and penetrating view of what is certainly one of the most difficult, challenging, and obscure occupations in America.

Acknowledgments

This edition, like its three predecessors, is the result of the professional assistance of several practitioners and publishing people at Prentice Hall. First, I continue to benefit from my friendships and professional associations with Frank Mortimer, Executive Editor, Sarah Holle, Associate Editor and Production Editor, Brian Hyland. The author also wishes to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of the following reviewers * * * * * * * * * * * . Their reviews of this firth edition resulted in many beneficial changes. Also, Michael Goo, Washoe County (Nevada) Sheriff's Office, provided photographic assistance.

Summaries
Long Description
Based on the author's 35 years of experience as a scholar and police practitioner, Policing America: Methods, Issues, Challenges 5e provides a comprehensive and realistic introduction to one of the most difficult and challenging occupations in America. The text delivers a "real world" look at policing, and show students what it is like to wear a police uniform in America today.
Main Description
Designed to put readers "inside" the police officer's uniform, this personally-involving, comprehensive, and timely introduction to police work provides a "real-world" flavor not found in most policing books. Written in an exceptionally reader-friendly open and frank style, it blends the real and the idealreflecting the author's more than 30 years' experience as a police administrator and academic. Features boxed articles from Law Enforcement News, and "Practitioner's Perspectives" with short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing. Policing Levels, Roles, and Functions. Police Subculture: The Making of a Cop. Organization and Administration. On Patrol: Personnel, Methods, Functions. Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving. Criminal Investigation. Extraordinary Problems and Methods. Police and the Rule of Law. Accountability: Ethics, Force and Corruption, Discipline. Civil Liability. Issues and Trends. Comparative Perspectives. Technology Review. Challenges of the Future. For those involved/interested in General Policing, Community Policing, and Policing Issues.
Main Description
Designed to put readers "inside" the police officer's uniform, this personally-involving, comprehensive, and timely introduction to police work provides a "real-world" flavor not found in most policing books. Written in an exceptionally reader-friendly open and frank style, itblendsthe real and the idealreflecting the author's more than 30 years'experience as a police administrator and academic. Features boxed articles fromLaw Enforcement News, and "Practitioner's Perspectives" with short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing.Policing Levels, Roles, and Functions. Police Subculture: The Making of a Cop. Organization and Administration. On Patrol: Personnel, Methods, Functions. Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving. Criminal Investigation. Extraordinary Problems and Methods. Police and the Rule of Law. Accountability: Ethics, Force and Corruption, Discipline. Civil Liability. Issues and Trends. Comparative Perspectives. Technology Review. Challenges of the Future.For those involved/interested in General Policing, Community Policing, and Policing Issues.
Main Description
Designed to put readers "inside" the police officer's uniform, this personally-involving, comprehensive, and timely introduction to police work provides a "real-world" flavor not found in most policing books. Written in an exceptionally reader-friendly open and frank style, it blends the real and the ideal-reflecting the author's more than 30 years'experience as a police administrator and academic. Features boxed articles from Law Enforcement News , and "Practitioner's Perspectives" with short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing. Policing Levels, Roles, and Functions. Police Subculture: The Making of a Cop. Organization and Administration. On Patrol: Personnel, Methods, Functions. Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving. Criminal Investigation. Extraordinary Problems and Methods. Police and the Rule of Law. Accountability: Ethics, Force and Corruption, Discipline. Civil Liability. Issues and Trends. Comparative Perspectives. Technology Review. Challenges of the Future. For those involved/interested in General Policing, Community Policing, and Policing Issues.
Main Description
Designed to put readers "inside" the police officer's uniform, this personally-involving, comprehensive, and timely introduction to police work provides a "real-world" flavor not found in most policing books. Written in an exceptionally reader-friendly open and frank style, it blends the real and the idealreflecting the author's more than 30 years'experience as a police administrator and academic. Features boxed articles from Law Enforcement News , and "Practitioner's Perspectives" with short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing.Policing Levels, Roles, and Functions. Police Subculture: The Making of a Cop. Organization and Administration. On Patrol: Personnel, Methods, Functions. Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving. Criminal Investigation. Extraordinary Problems and Methods. Police and the Rule of Law. Accountability: Ethics, Force and Corruption, Discipline. Civil Liability. Issues and Trends. Comparative Perspectives. Technology Review. Challenges of the Future.For those involved/interested in General Policing, Community Policing, and Policing Issues.
Main Description
Designed to put readers “inside” the police officer's uniform, this personally-involving, comprehensive, and timely introduction to police work provides a “real-world” flavor not found in most policing books. Written in an exceptionally reader-friendly open and frank style, it blends the real and the ideal–reflecting the author's more than 30 years'experience as a police administrator and academic. Features boxed articles from Law Enforcement News , and “Practitioner's Perspectives” with short essays written by selected individuals who have expertise in particular areas of policing.Policing Levels, Roles, and Functions. Police Subculture: The Making of a Cop. Organization and Administration. On Patrol: Personnel, Methods, Functions. Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving. Criminal Investigation. Extraordinary Problems and Methods. Police and the Rule of Law. Accountability: Ethics, Force and Corruption, Discipline. Civil Liability. Issues and Trends. Comparative Perspectives. Technology Review. Challenges of the Future.For those involved/interested in General Policing, Community Policing, and Policing Issues.
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xv
About the Authorp. xvii
Introductionp. xix
Historical Developmentp. 1
Introductionp. 1
English and Colonial Officers of the Lawp. 2
Sheriff
Constable
Coroner
Justice of the Peace
The Old English System of Policingp. 6
Policing in Colonial America
Legacies of the Colonial Period
Police Reform in England and America, 1829-1860p. 11
Full-time Policing Comes to the United Statesp. 14
Imitating Peel
Early Issues and New Traditions
Attempts at Reform in Difficult Times
Increased Politics and Corruption
Meanwhile, on the American Frontier ...
Practitioner's Perspective: "What Science Has Done for the Police,"p. 20
The Entrenchment of Political Influence
The Movement toward Professionalizationp. 23
Attempts to Thwart Political Patronage
The Era of August Vollmer
The Crime-Fighter Image
The Wickersham Commission
Police as the "Thin Blue Line": William H. Parker
A Retreat from the Professional Modelp. 30
Coming Full Circle to Peel: The President's Crime Commission
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Policing Levels, Roles, and Functionsp. 35
Introductionp. 35
Federal Law Enforcement Agenciesp. 36
Department of Justice
Practitioner's Perspective: "Cooperation in Law Enforcement: the Necessary Element,"p. 37
Department of the Treasury
Other Federal Agencies
State and Local Police Agenciesp. 57
State Police
Municipal Police Agencies
Sheriff's Departments
Roles, Functions, Styles of Policingp. 60
Defining and Understanding the Role
Role Conflicts
Policing Functions and Styles
Which Role, Function, and Style Is Typically Employed?
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Police Subculture: The Making of a Copp. 68
Introductionp. 68
The Process Begins: Recruiting, Hiring and Training New Personnelp. 69
Recruiting Qualified Applicants: Who Is the Prospective Cop?
Written Examinations: General Knowledge and Psychological Tests
Physical Agility Test
Oral Interview
Character Investigation
Polygraph Examination
Medical Testing/Drug Screening
Recruit Academy Training
Probationary Status: In-Service Trainingp. 86
The Field Training Officer Concept
Having the "Right Stuff": A Working Personalityp. 87
Developing and Using a Police Personality
What Traits Make a Good Cop?
The Police Perspective
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Organization and Administrationp. 94
Introductionp. 94
Organizations and the Policep. 95
What Are Organizations?
Organizations as Bureaucracies
Police Agencies as Organizations
Contemporary Police Chiefs and Sheriffsp. 103
Chief of Police
County Sheriff
Roles of the Police Executive: A Modelp. 106
Applying the Mintzberg Model of CEOs
Practitioner's Perspective: "Police Ingenuity and Entrepreneurship,"p. 108
An Example of Mintzberg in Action: NYPD's Compstat
Middle Managers: Captains and Lieutenantsp. 111
The First-Line Supervisorp. 112
A Complex Role
Police and Politicsp. 113
Political Exploitation of the Police
Police Executive Relations and Expectations
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
On Patrol: Personnel, Methods, Functionsp. 118
Introductionp. 118
Origins of the Patrol Functionp. 119
Studies of the Patrol Functionp. 120
Patrol Officers on the Jobp. 122
Patrol as Work
Police Work as a Function of Shift Assignment
Back to Basics: Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solvingp. 126
Why Regress to Old Methods?
The Emergence of New Strategies
Changing the Police Culture
The Problem Solving Model: S.A.R.A.
Studying Prey: Repeat Victimization
The Traffic Functionp. 133
Early Impact of Mobility on Patrol
Policing Today's Motorized Society
Traffic Accident Investigation
In Pursuit of the "Phantom Driver"
A Traffic Radar/Cancer Link?
Discretionary Use of Police Authorityp. 137
An Exercise in Discretion
Determinants of Discretionary Actions
Pros, Cons, and Politics of Discretionary Authority
Summary
Solutions to the Discretion Exercise
Items for Review
Notes
Criminal Investigation: The Science of Detectionp. 145
Introductionp. 146
The Scope of Forensic Science and Criminalisticsp. 146
Origins of Criminalisticsp. 147
Personal Identification: Anthropometry and Dactylography
Fingerprinting Prevails over the Bertillon System
The Jones and West Cases
Firearms Identification
Contributions of August Vollmer and Others
The Evolution of Criminal Investigationp. 153
Investigative Beginnings: The English Contribution
Investigative Techniques Come to America
State and Federal Developments
Forensic Science and the Criminal Justice Systemp. 156
Investigative Stages and Activities
Arrest and Case Preparation
The Detective: Qualities and Functionsp. 158
Research into Criminal Investigationsp. 160
Officers Who "Disappear": Working Undercoverp. 160
A Choice Assignment
Problems with the Role
Uses of the Polygraphp. 162
Behavioral Science in Criminal Investigationp. 162
Psychological Profiles
Psychics and Hypnosis
Recent Developments in Forensic Sciencep. 165
Advances on Several Fronts
Testing Hair for Illicit Drug Use
Progress with Fingerprint Identification
DNA Analysis
Forensic Entomology: Using "Insect Detectives"
Investigating "Cybercrooks"p. 172
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Extraordinary Problems and Methodsp. 177
Introductionp. 178
Policing the Militia Movementp. 178
Why Militias?
Rampant Paranoia
Foundation and Legal Status
What Can Be Done?
Policing the Mafiap. 182
Unique Origins
Today's Mafia: High Profits, Low Profile
A Police Offensive
Policing's Own "M.O."
Practitioner's Perspective: "Going Undercover: an Fbi Agent's Two-Year Experience,"p. 185
Policing Street Gangsp. 187
Definition and Foundation
Gang Types, Status, Activities, and Characteristics
Graffiti and Hand Signals
Strategies for Controlling Gangs
Policing in Small and Rural Jurisdictionsp. 193
Crime Problems
Unique Duties
Some Concerns
Policing the Homelessp. 195
Who Are the Homeless?
What Can the Police Do?
Policing America's Bordersp. 198
A Nightly Drama at Our Perimeter
Practitioner's Perspective: "Working 'America's Most Dangerous Border': The San Diego Sector,"p. 200
Smuggling People for Profit
What Can Border Agents Do?
Special Operations: Hostage Negotiationp. 204
Definitions and Types of Hostage Takers
The Stockholm Syndrome
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Police and the Rule of Lawp. 210
Introductionp. 211
Finding and Understanding the Lawp. 211
The Rule of Lawp. 212
The Fourth Amendment
The Fifth Amendment
The Sixth Amendment
Juvenile Rightsp. 235
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Accountability: Ethics, Corruption and Constitutional Limitationsp. 240
Introductionp. 241
Police Ethicsp. 241
Definition, Types, and Issues
Ethics and Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving
Investigating Citizen Complaintsp. 247
Police Violence and the Use of Forcep. 248
The Force Prerogative
Police Brutality
Use of Deadly Force
Controlling Deadly and Excessive Force
A Related Issue: Domestic Violence Involving Police Officers
Police Corruptionp. 252
When "the Bad Guys" Are the Police
Types and Causes of Corruption
The Code of Silence
Investigating and Prosecuting Police Corruption
Solutions to Corruption
Officers' Constitutional Limitationsp. 257
Free Speech
Searches and Seizures
Self-Incrimination
Religious Practices
Sexual Misconduct
Residency Requirements
Moonlighting
Misuse of Firearms
Alcohol and Drug Abuse
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Civil Liability: The Outgrowth of Failurep. 265
Introductionp. 265
A Legal Foundationp. 266
History and Growth of Section 1983 Litigation
Police Actions Promoting Section 1983 Liability
Criminal Prosecutions for Police Misconduct
Liability of Police Supervisorsp. 274
Police Civil Liability Cases: An Overview of Federal Court Decisionsp. 275
Practitioner's Perspective: "Police and Civil Liability,"p. 276
New Areas of Potential Liabilityp. 278
Vehicle Pursuits
Handling Computer Evidence
Disseminating Public Information
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Issues and Trendsp. 283
Introductionp. 283
Contemporary Policing Trendsp. 284
Rights of Police Officers
Women and Minorities in Policing
Practitioner's Perspective: "Women in Policing,"p. 287
On Guard: The Private Police
Unionization and Job Actions
Contract and Consolidated Policing
Civilianization
Accreditation
Contemporary Policing Issuesp. 300
Higher Education for Police
Stress: Personal Costs of Doing the Job
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Comparative Perspectivesp. 315
Introductionp. 315
Policing in Chinap. 316
Policing a Vast Land
A Harsh Justice System
Police Organization
Police and Human Rights
Policing in Saudi Arabiap. 320
Social Behavior in a Patriarchal Land
Religious Underpinnings
Laws and Prohibitions
Guardians of Religious Purity
Policing in Northern Irelandp. 324
Prologue: Are the Troubles Over?
A Divided Land
Political Factions and Violence
Attacking the Royal Ulster Constabulary
Policing the Terrorist War
Organization of the RUC
The RUC and Human Rights
Epilogue
Policing in Mexicop. 331
Police Organization
Recruitment and Training
Level and Types of Crimes
Criminal Codes and the Legal System
The Horror of Mexico's Jails
Interpolp. 334
Tracking International Criminals
A Formula for Success
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Tools for the Task: Technology Reviewp. 340
Introductionp. 340
Use of Wireless Technologyp. 341
Instant Access to Information
Mapping and Profiling Systemsp. 342
Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving
Crime Analysis
Locating Serial Offenders
Gunshot Locator System
Dogs and Lost Persons
Electronics in Traffic Functionsp. 346
Accident Investigation
Arresting Impaired Drivers
Preventing High-Speed Chases
Imaging Systemsp. 348
Crowd Surveillance
Fingerprints and Mug Shots
Crime Scenes: Computers Explore and Draft Evidencep. 350
Developments Concerning Firearmsp. 350
"Rearming" the Police
Firearms Training
Less-than-Lethal Weapons
Connecting Guns to Crimes
Brady Bill Background Checks
Gang Intelligence Systemsp. 353
Improving Communicationsp. 353
Enhanced Dispatch Systems
NCIC 2000
Two Additional Toolsp. 354
Videocameras
Body Armor
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Challenges of the Futurep. 359
Introductionp. 359
Predicting the Futurep. 360
A Changing Societyp. 361
Different Faces
Different Workplaces
Different Patterns of Crime
Police and Changep. 363
Prospects for, Types of Change
Practitioner's Perspective: "Police Innovation,"p. 364
Predictions for the Policep. 366
Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving
Future High Technology
Budgets, Organization, and Personnel
Other Possibilities
Summary
Items for Review
Notes
Career Informationp. 373
Name Indexp. 377
Subject Indexp. 381
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

This information is provided by a service that aggregates data from review sources and other sources that are often consulted by libraries, and readers. The University does not edit this information and merely includes it as a convenience for users. It does not warrant that reviews are accurate. As with any review users should approach reviews critically and where deemed necessary should consult multiple review sources. Any concerns or questions about particular reviews should be directed to the reviewer and/or publisher.

  link to old catalogue

Report a problem