Catalogue


Understanding Web services : XML, WSDL, SOAP, and UDDI /
Eric Newcomer.
imprint
Boston : Addison-Wesley, c2002.
description
xxviii, 332 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0201750813 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Boston : Addison-Wesley, c2002.
isbn
0201750813 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5850560
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 309-315) and index.
A Look Inside
Excerpts
Introduction or Preface
I first encountered XML as an integration technology in early 1998 during a visit to KPN Telecom in the Netherlands. The company was asking for proposals to help it develop an enterprise integration architecture based on the hub and spoke model, using XML as the canonical message format that would tie together the company's thousands of systems and hundreds of programming languages. My employer at the time, Compaq (Digital), did not win the project, but the controversial idea of using XML in a data-independent integration layer stuck with me. Now Web services are fulfilling that promise for everyone. I joined IONA in the fall of 1999 and among other things soon began chairing the Object Management Group submitter's team drafting the XML Value specification, mapping XML to CORBA. In early 2000, I got involved in the new effort Microsoft was leading to define a distributed computing protocol for the Internet: SOAP. Previous attempts to promote the CORBA protocol had failed by then, and the W3C's own attempt, HTTP-NG, had also fallen flat. But the idea of serializing XML over HTTP seemed to hold promise for a solution. IONA formally joined the SOAP effort in March 2000, before IBM joined and put the effort on the map. I worked with Andrew Layman, David Turner, John Montgomery, and others at Microsoft to bring IONA into the picture as a SOAP supporter and, in fact, as the first J2EE vendor to support SOAP. IONA demonstrated Web services interoperability at several Microsoft events during that year. The Microsoft presenter would introduce its SOAP Toolkit and demonstrate interoperability with a COM server. Then the IONA presenter was called on to describe how the same SOAP interface could interoperate with a Java server. After that, I organized IONA's initial participation at W3C, supported the establishment of the XML Protocols Working Group, helped write the group charter, and began representing IONA at the XML Protocols Working Group, and more recently, at the Web Services Architecture Working Group. IONA has supported the submission of SOAP to W3C, WSDL, SOAP with Attachments, and XKMS. One thing led to another, and I eventually took on the responsibility of delivering IONA's implementation of Web services integration technologies. In October 2000, I represented IONA at the UDDI kick-off meeting. It was then that I realized the potential for Web services technologies for application integration inside the firewall. Why not use SOAP, UDDI, and WSDL for internal projects? Then you could use the same approach for integration, regardless of whether it's inside the company or across the Internet. David Vaskevitch presented at the UDDI conference, and this reminded me of the 1995 chapter inThe Future of Softwarethat I coauthored for Digital Equipment Corporation. David was author of the Microsoft chapter in that same book. In the Digital chapter, "The Key to the Highway," Peter Conklin and I compared the potential power of software standards to the impact of standards on the automobile. Standardized parts enabled mass production, which revolutionized the industry and society. Today, software remains essentially a craft business, as automobiles were at the start of the twentieth century. Having widely adopted standards has remained elusive despite many attempts. We may be at the crossroads; Web services may finally do the trick. I hope this book helps you understand what Web services are all about. If it serves as a decent introduction to the main ideas, concepts, and technologies, it will have done its job and find its place in the Web services community. 0201750813P05082002
First Chapter

I first encountered XML as an integration technology in early 1998 during a visit to KPN Telecom in the Netherlands. The company was asking for proposals to help it develop an enterprise integration architecture based on the hub and spoke model, using XML as the canonical message format that would tie together the company's thousands of systems and hundreds of programming languages. My employer at the time, Compaq (Digital), did not win the project, but the controversial idea of using XML in a data-independent integration layer stuck with me. Now Web services are fulfilling that promise for everyone.

I joined IONA in the fall of 1999 and among other things soon began chairing the Object Management Group submitter's team drafting the XML Value specification, mapping XML to CORBA. In early 2000, I got involved in the new effort Microsoft was leading to define a distributed computing protocol for the Internet: SOAP. Previous attempts to promote the CORBA protocol had failed by then, and the W3C's own attempt, HTTP-NG, had also fallen flat. But the idea of serializing XML over HTTP seemed to hold promise for a solution.

IONA formally joined the SOAP effort in March 2000, before IBM joined and put the effort on the map. I worked with Andrew Layman, David Turner, John Montgomery, and others at Microsoft to bring IONA into the picture as a SOAP supporter and, in fact, as the first J2EE vendor to support SOAP. IONA demonstrated Web services interoperability at several Microsoft events during that year. The Microsoft presenter would introduce its SOAP Toolkit and demonstrate interoperability with a COM server. Then the IONA presenter was called on to describe how the same SOAP interface could interoperate with a Java server.

After that, I organized IONA's initial participation at W3C, supported the establishment of the XML Protocols Working Group, helped write the group charter, and began representing IONA at the XML Protocols Working Group, and more recently, at the Web Services Architecture Working Group. IONA has supported the submission of SOAP to W3C, WSDL, SOAP with Attachments, and XKMS. One thing led to another, and I eventually took on the responsibility of delivering IONA's implementation of Web services integration technologies.

In October 2000, I represented IONA at the UDDI kick-off meeting. It was then that I realized the potential for Web services technologies for application integration inside the firewall. Why not use SOAP, UDDI, and WSDL for internal projects? Then you could use the same approach for integration, regardless of whether it's inside the company or across the Internet.

David Vaskevitch presented at the UDDI conference, and this reminded me of the 1995 chapter inThe Future of Softwarethat I coauthored for Digital Equipment Corporation. David was author of the Microsoft chapter in that same book. In the Digital chapter, "The Key to the Highway," Peter Conklin and I compared the potential power of software standards to the impact of standards on the automobile. Standardized parts enabled mass production, which revolutionized the industry and society. Today, software remains essentially a craft business, as automobiles were at the start of the twentieth century. Having widely adopted standards has remained elusive despite many attempts. We may be at the crossroads; Web services may finally do the trick.

I hope this book helps you understand what Web services are all about. If it serves as a decent introduction to the main ideas, concepts, and technologies, it will have done its job and find its place in the Web services community.



0201750813P05082002
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SciTech Book News, September 2002
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Summaries
Long Description
In Understanding Web Services, leading Web Services expert Eric Newcomer systematically addresses the core issues developers and IT professionals need to understand to make intelligent decisions about Web Services. Newcomer explains exactly how Web Services work, reviews each key standard for enabling Web Services, and previews tomorrow's most important products and technologies for Web Services development. Newcomer reviews the key goals and advantages of Web Services, the applications they are best suited for, and today's key standards for describing, sending, receiving, publishing, discovering, and utilizing them. He explains how Web Services are being built upon the foundation of XML technologies, then covers each key Web Services standard in detail: SOAP transport, WSDL services description, UDDI discovery services, and ebXML message exchange. Newcomer concludes with insightful, vendor-independent coverage of today's leading tools and products for Web Services development. For every IT manager, architect, developer, and strategist who wants a thorough understanding of Web Services.
Main Description
This book introduces the main ideas and concepts behind core and extended Web services' technologies and provides developers with a primer for each of the major technologies that have emerged in this space.
Back Cover Copy
Web services enable the new generation of Internet-based applications. These services support application-to-application Internet communication--that is, applications at different network locations can be integrated to function as if they were part of a single, large software system. Examples of applications made possible by Web services include automated business transactions and direct (nonbrowser) desktop and handheld device access to reservations, stock trading, and order-tracking systems. Several key standards have emerged that together form the foundation for Web services: XML (Extensible Markup Language), WSDL (Web Services Definition Language), SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol), and UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration). In addition, ebXML (Electronic Business XML) has been specified to facilitate automated business process integration among trading partners. This book introduces the main ideas and concepts behind core and extended Web services' technologies and provides developers with a primer for each of the major technologies that have emerged in this space. In addition, Understanding Web Services summarizes the major architectural approaches to Web services, examines the role of Web services within the .NET and J2EE communities, and provides information about major product offerings from BEA, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, IONA, Microsoft, Oracle, Sun Microsystems, and others. Key topics include: XML facilities for structuring and serializing data How WSDL maps services onto communication protocols and transports WSDL support for RPC-oriented and document-oriented interactions SOAP's required and optional elements Message processing and the role of intermediaries in SOAP UDDI data formats and APIs How ebXML offers an alternative to Web services that supports reliable messaging, security, and trading-partner negotiations With Understanding Web Services, you will be well informed and well positioned to participate in this vast, emerging marketplace. 0201750813B05172002
Back Cover Copy
Web services enable the new generation of Internet-based applications. These services support application-to-application Internet communication--that is, applications at different network locations can be integrated to function as if they were part of a single, large software system. Examples of applications made possible by Web services include automated business transactions and direct (nonbrowser) desktop and handheld device access to reservations, stock trading, and order-tracking systems. Several key standards have emerged that together form the foundation for Web services: XML (Extensible Markup Language), WSDL (Web Services Definition Language), SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol), and UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration). In addition, ebXML (Electronic Business XML) has been specified to facilitate automated business process integration among trading partners. This book introduces the main ideas and concepts behind core and extended Web services' technologies and provides developers with a primer for each of the major technologies that have emerged in this space. In addition,Understanding Web Servicessummarizes the major architectural approaches to Web services, examines the role of Web services within the .NET and J2EE communities, and provides information about major product offerings from BEA, Hewlett-Packard, IBM, IONA, Microsoft, Oracle, Sun Microsystems, and others. Key topics include: XML facilities for structuring and serializing data How WSDL maps services onto communication protocols and transports WSDL support for RPC-oriented and document-oriented interactions SOAP's required and optional elements Message processing and the role of intermediaries in SOAP UDDI data formats and APIs How ebXML offers an alternative to Web services that supports reliable messaging, security, and trading-partner negotiations WithUnderstanding Web Services, you will be well informed and well positioned to participate in this vast, emerging marketplace. 0201750813B05172002
Table of Contents
Prefacep. xiii
Acknowledgmentsp. xvii
Introductionp. xix
Introducing Web Servicesp. 1
The Basics of Web Servicesp. 2
A Simple Example: Searching for Informationp. 4
The Next Generation of the Webp. 5
Interacting with Web Servicesp. 10
RPC-Oriented Interactionsp. 11
Document-Oriented Interactionsp. 12
The Technology of Web Servicesp. 14
Usage Examplep. 16
XML: The Foundationp. 20
WSDL: Describing Web Servicesp. 24
SOAP: Accessing Web Servicesp. 27
UDDI: Publishing and Discovering Web Servicesp. 29
XML for Business Collaboration: ebXMLp. 32
Web Services versus Other Technologiesp. 35
Additional Technologiesp. 37
Vendor Approaches to Web Servicesp. 42
Summaryp. 45
Describing Information: XMLp. 47
A Simple Examplep. 48
Instance and Schemap. 51
Data Type and Programming Languagep. 54
More on XML Schemas and DTDsp. 56
Processing XML Documentsp. 62
Namespacesp. 63
Transformationp. 67
XSLTp. 68
XPathp. 70
Document Structurep. 70
Mapping Toolsp. 73
A Simple Example (Revisited)p. 75
XML Specifications and Informationp. 76
XML Specifications Related to Web Servicesp. 77
General Informationp. 78
Summaryp. 80
Describing Web Services: WSDLp. 81
WSDL Basicsp. 82
WSDL Elementsp. 85
The Extensible WSDL Frameworkp. 89
Defining Message Data Typesp. 90
Defining Operations on Messagesp. 94
Mapping Messages to Protocolsp. 97
Putting It All Togetherp. 104
Importing WSDL Elementsp. 105
WSDL-Related Namespacesp. 106
Extensions for Binding to SOAPp. 107
Summaryp. 109
Accessing Web Services: SOAPp. 111
A Simple Examplep. 114
The SOAP Specificationp. 116
SOAP Envelopep. 119
SOAP Headerp. 121
SOAP Bodyp. 124
SOAP Faultsp. 125
RPC Conventionp. 128
Data Type Mappingp. 133
HTTP Bindingp. 135
Version Controlp. 135
SOAP Message Processingp. 137
SOAP Use of Namespacesp. 142
Changes in the v1.2 Draftp. 143
SOAP Multipart MIME Attachmentsp. 145
SOAP in the Context of Existing Systemsp. 146
SOAP's Future Directionsp. 147
Summaryp. 149
Finding Web Services: UDDI Registryp. 151
The UDDI Organizationp. 153
The Concepts Underlying UDDIp. 156
How UDDI Worksp. 157
UDDI Data Modelp. 160
Generic Datap. 162
The Business Entityp. 164
The Binding Templatep. 166
The tModelp. 166
UDDI SOAP APIsp. 169
Inquiry APIsp. 170
Publisher APIsp. 172
Usage Scenariop. 175
Updating the Registryp. 176
Retrieving Informationp. 178
Using WSDL with UDDIp. 181
UDDI for Private Usep. 183
UDDI Support for SOAP, Complex Business Relationships, and Unicodep. 185
SOAPp. 185
Unicodep. 188
Summaryp. 186
An Alternative Approach: ebXMLp. 187
Overview of ebXMLp. 189
A Simple Examplep. 191
Deploying ebXMLp. 195
The ebXML Specificationsp. 200
Architectural Overviewp. 202
Summaryp. 217
Web Services Architecture: Additional Technologiesp. 219
Securityp. 223
WS-License and WS-Securityp. 239
Process Flowp. 230
XLANGp. 230
Transaction Coordinationp. 235
BTPp. 246
Extended Transactionsp. 238
Messagingp. 239
WS-Inspectionp. 240
WS-Referralp. 241
WS-Routingp. 241
BEEPp. 243
Reliable HTTPp. 245
Web Services Foundationsp. 246
RosettaNetp. 247
XML-RPCp. 250
Summaryp. 253
Implementing Web Servicesp. 255
Implementation Architecturesp. 258
The Major Implementation Streamsp. 263
Microsoft's .NETp. 264
J2EE and Application Serversp. 268
Application Server Vendor Viewp. 270
Java APIs for Web Servicesp. 272
J2EE Initiatives for Additional Technologiesp. 272
Understanding .NET versus J2EEp. 274
Vendor Views on Adoption of Web Services Technologiesp. 276
The Questionnairep. 276
BEA Systemsp. 278
Cape Clearp. 281
Hewlett-Packardp. 283
IBMp. 286
IONAp. 292
Microsoftp. 294
Oraclep. 298
Sun Microsystemsp. 300
Systinetp. 302
Othersp. 305
Implementations of ebXMLp. 306
Summaryp. 307
Bibliographyp. 309
Indexp. 315
Table of Contents provided by Syndetics. All Rights Reserved.

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