Catalogue


Claims to memory : beyond slavery and emancipation in the French Caribbean /
Catherine A. Reinhardt.
imprint
New York : Berghahn Books, 2006.
description
xiii, 202 p. : ill.
ISBN
1845450795 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
New York : Berghahn Books, 2006.
isbn
1845450795 (alk. paper)
catalogue key
5848951
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. [177]-196) and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-03-01:
The citizens of Martinique and Guadeloupe still struggle with the memories of slavery, though it was abolished over 150 years ago. Reinhardt (French, Chapman Univ.) artfully marshals diverse primary sources (books, letters, and political pamphlets) spanning over 300 years to establish historical connections between Caribbean reality, literary productions, and political claims. Her first chapter investigates the ideology of universal freedom as espoused in the writings of philosophes like Montesquieu, Voltaire, and Condorcet. She convincingly argues that the philosophes both supported and opposed slavery. Chapter 2 sensitively portrays the history of marronnage. Unfortunately, Reinhardt inaccurately categorizes all instances of slave resistance as marronnage. Chapters 3 and 4 outline changing ideas concerning the concept of freedom, while chapter 5 examines contemporary Caribbean ideas about slavery. Reinhardt correctly argues that African American slaves played a decisive role in slavery's abolition. The author does a creditable job of portraying African American ideas, but fails to represent the diverse opinions of nonblacks. She contends, for example, that Caribbean whites are ignorant about the slave past, which is not true. Many Caribbean whites, like African Americans, struggle mightily with the past. It is a pity that more white perspectives (French, Creole, and Beke) were not incorporated into the presentation. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. D. Glazier University of Nebraska--Lincoln
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Choice, March 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
Why do the people of the French Caribbean still continue to be haunted by the memory of their slave past one hundred and fifty years after the abolition of slavery? What process led to the divorce of their collective memory of slavery and emancipation from France's portrayal of these historical phenomena? How are Martinicans and Guadeloupeans today transforming the silences of the past into historical and cultural manifestations rooted in the Caribbean? This book answers these questions by relating the 1998 debate surrounding the 150th anniversary of France's abolition of slavery to the period of the slave regime spanning the late Enlightenment and the French Revolution. By comparing a diversity of documents including letters by slaves, free people of color and planters, as well as literary works, royal decrees and court cases, the author untangles the complex forces of the slave regime that shaped the collective memory of slaves and free coloreds.
Bowker Data Service Summary
By comparing a diversity of documents including letters by slaves, free people of colour and planters, as well as literary works, royal decrees and court cases, Catherine Reinhardt untangles the complex forces of the slave regime that shaped the collective memory of slaves and free coloureds.
Main Description
WINNER OF THE CARIBBEAN PHILOSOPHICAL ASSOCIATION'S 2007 FRANTZ FANON PRIZE FOR OUTSTANDING WORK IN CARIBBEAN THOUGHT Why do the people of the French Caribbean still continue to be haunted by the memory of their slave past more than one hundred and fifty years after the abolition of slavery? What process led to the divorce of their collective memory of slavery and emancipation from France's portrayal of these historical phenomena? How are Martinicans and Guadeloupeans today transforming the silences of the past into historical and cultural manifestations rooted in the Caribbean? This book answers these questions by relating the 1998 controversy surrounding the 150th anniversary of France's abolition of slavery to the period of the slave regime spanning the late Enlightenment and the French Revolution. By comparing a diversity of documents-including letters by slaves, free people of color, and planters, as well as writings by the philosophes, royal decrees, and court cases-the author untangles the complex forces of the slave regime that have shaped collective memory. The current nationalization of the memory of slavery in France has turned these once peripheral claims into passionate political and cultural debates. Catherine Reinhardt is a lecturer of French at Chapman University. She has given numerous talks and published articles on slavery in the French Caribbean and on French and Caribbean literature.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Memories of Slavery
Realms of the Enlightenment
Realms of the Maroon
Realms of Freedom
Realms of Assimilation
Realms of Memory
Conclusion: Beyond Slavery
Postscript
Appendix
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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