Catalogue

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German migrants in post-war Britain : an enemy embrace /
Inge Weber-Newth and Johannes-Dieter Steinert.
imprint
Abingdon, Oxon ; New York : Routledge, 2006.
description
viii, 244 p.
ISBN
0714656577 (hard cover)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Abingdon, Oxon ; New York : Routledge, 2006.
isbn
0714656577 (hard cover)
contents note
Britain and West Germany in the post-war period -- Immigration policy, immigrant policy -- Life and work in post-war Britain -- Welfare and support -- Fifty years on -- Five life stories.
catalogue key
5847907
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Reviews
This item was reviewed in:
Reference & Research Book News, August 2006
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Summaries
Back Cover Copy
Both timely and topical, with 2005 marking the 60th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, this unique book examines the little-known and under-researched area of German migration to Britain in the immediate post-war era. Authors Weber-Newth and Steinert analyze the political framework of post-war immigration and immigrant policy, and the complex decision-making processes that led to large-scale labour migration from the continent. They consider: * identity, perception of self and others, stereotypes and prejudice * how migrants dealt with language and intercultural issues * migrants' attitudes towards national socialist and contemporary Germany * migrants' motivation for leaving Germany * migrants' initial experiences and their reception in Britain after the war, as recalled after 50 years in the host country, compared to their original expectations. Based on rich British and German governmental and non-governmental archive sources, contemporary newspaper articles and nearly eighty biographically-oriented interviews with German migrants, this outstanding volume, a must-read for students and scholars in the fields of social history, sociology and migration studies, expertly encompasses political as well as social-historical questions and engages with the social, economic and cultural situation of German immigrants to Britain from a life-historical perspective.
Bowker Data Service Summary
Both timely and topical, with 2005 marking the 60th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, this text examines the little-known and under-researched area of German migration to Britian in the immediate post-war era.
Main Description
Both timely and topical, with 2005 marking the 60th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, this unique book examines the little-known and under-researched area of German migration to Britain in the immediate post-war era. Authors Weber-Newth and Steinert analyze the political framework of post-war immigration and immigrant policy, and the complex decision-making processes that led to large-scale labor migration from the continent. They consider: * Identity, perception of self and others, stereotypes and prejudice * How migrants dealt with language and intercultural issues * Migrants attitudes towards national socialist and contemporary Germany * Migrants motivation for leaving Germany * Migrants initial experiences and their reception in Britain after the war, as recalled after 50 years in the host country, compared to their original expectations. Based on rich British and German governmental and non-governmental archive sources, contemporary newspaper articles and nearlyeighty biographically-oriented interviews with German migrants, this outstanding volume encompasses political as well as social-historical questions, and engages with the social, economic and cultural situation of German immigrants to Britain from a life-historical perspective.
Main Description
Both timely and topical, with 2005 marking the 60th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, this unique book examines the little-known and under-researched area of German migration to Britain in the immediate post-war era. Authors Weber-Newth and Steinert analyze the political framework of post-war immigration and immigrant policy, and the complex decision-making processes that led to large-scale labour migration from the continent. They consider: * identity, perception of self and others, stereotypes and prejudice * how migrants dealt with language and intercultural issues * migrants' attitudes towards national socialist and contemporary Germany * migrants' motivation for leaving Germany * migrants' initial experiences and their reception in Britain after the war, as recalled after 50 years in the host country, compared to their original expectations. Based on rich British and German governmental and non-governmental archive sources, contemporary newspaper articles and nearly eighty biographicallyoriented interviews with German migrants, this outstanding volume, a must-read for students and scholars in the fields of social history, sociology and migration studies, expertly encompasses political as well as social-historical questions and engages with the social, economic and cultural situation of German immigrants to Britain from a life-historical perspective.
Table of Contents
Britain and West Germany in the post-war periodp. 9
Immigration policy-immigrant policyp. 23
Life and work in post-war Britain : the migrants' experiencep. 51
Welfare and supportp. 117
Fifty years onp. 132
Five life storiesp. 170
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

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