Catalogue


Unconquered : the Iroquois League at war in colonial America /
Daniel P. Barr.
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2006.
description
xix, 193 p.
ISBN
0275984664 (alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2006.
isbn
0275984664 (alk. paper)
contents note
Prologue: The wars of the Iroquois -- Born from blood -- Guns and furs -- The Great Mourning War -- The longhouse in peril -- The longhouse uunder siege -- The long neutrality -- The longhouse divided -- The longhouse in flames -- Epilogue: The longhouse endures.
catalogue key
5845377
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-01-01:
Barr's brief synthesis attempts to treat every military campaign from the "Beaver Wars" through the American Revolution. After describing Iroquoian cosmology, mores, and defensive fortifications, the author discusses the "mourning war," the Iroquois practice of seeking war captives as replacements for population losses caused by epidemics. Barr (Robert Morris Univ.) writes on the Denonville expedition; Iroquois diplomacy leading to the Grand Settlement of 1701; Iroquois armed neutrality in the wars between England and France; and the Iroquois's disastrous split in the Revolution. The author makes use of The Jesuit Relations as well as monographs by Fenton, Graymont, Richter, Trigger, and Wallace, yet he also cites a college textbook (Taylor) and even a high school work (Graymont) in footnote citations. He ignores the important writings by Otterbein and Keener on Iroquoian military tactics and Eid on the Iroquois-Ojibwa War. His estimates on Huron versus Iroquois population are wrong. Barr appears to be unaware of the continued existence of many non-Iroquois Indians east of the Mississippi (approximately 25 percent of today's Native Americans). And to him, strangely, the Iroquois are "unconquered," even though they were dispossessed of 99 percent of their lands (1768 to 1846)! ^BSumming Up: Not recommended. L. M. Hauptman State University of New York at New Paltz
Reviews
Review Quotes
"Daniel P. Barr's UNCONQUERED: THE IROQUOIS LEAGUE AT WAR IN COLONIAL AMERICA joins others in the 'Modern Military Tradition' series, exploring the nature of Iroquois warfare and reviewing nearly two hundred years of conflict during colonial times in this country. The Iroquois conducted wars against the French, English, Americans and others: from economic consequences of rivalries to the foundations of war which dictated Iroquois League manners, UNCONQUERED provides a scholarly review of history and cultural influences and is a 'must' for any surveying Native American culture and patterns of war."- California Bookwatch
'Daniel P. Barr's UNCONQUERED: THE IROQUOIS LEAGUE AT WAR IN COLONIAL AMERICA joins others in the 'Modern Military Tradition' series, exploring the nature of Iroquois warfare and reviewing nearly two hundred years of conflict during colonial times in this country. The Iroquois conducted wars against the French, English, Americans and others: from economic consequences of rivalries to the foundations of war which dictated Iroquois League manners, UNCONQUERED provides a scholarly review of history and cultural influences and is a 'must' for any surveying Native American culture and patterns of war.'-California Bookwatch
"Daniel P. Barr's UNCONQUERED: THE IROQUOIS LEAGUE AT WAR IN COLONIAL AMERICA joins others in the 'Modern Military Tradition' series, exploring the nature of Iroquois warfare and reviewing nearly two hundred years of conflict during colonial times in this country. The Iroquois conducted wars against the French, English, Americans and others: from economic consequences of rivalries to the foundations of war which dictated Iroquois League manners, UNCONQUERED provides a scholarly review of history and cultural influences and is a 'must' for any surveying Native American culture and patterns of war."-California Bookwatch
"Daniel P. Barr's Unconquered: The Iroquois League at War in Colonial America joins others in the Modern Military Tradition series, exploring the nature of Iroquois warfare and reviewing nearly two hundred years of conflict during colonial times in this country. The Iroquois conducted wars against the French, English, Americans and others: from economic consequences of rivalries to the foundations of war which dictated Iroquois League manners, Unconquered provides a scholarly review of history and cultural influences and is a 'must' for any surveying Native American culture and patterns of war." - California Bookwatch
'œThis work presents a synthesis of Iroquois military history from the period of initial contact with Europeans to the close of the American Revolution.'' The Journal of American History
"This work presents a synthesis of Iroquois military history from the period of initial contact with Europeans to the close of the American Revolution."- The Journal of American History
'This work presents a synthesis of Iroquois military history from the period of initial contact with Europeans to the close of the American Revolution.'-The Journal of American History
"This work presents a synthesis of Iroquois military history from the period of initial contact with Europeans to the close of the American Revolution." - The Journal of American History
"Daniel Barr has given us a brilliant and powerful synthesis of the Iroquois struggles for survival and independence. Readers will be enthralled with this compelling account that places the Iroquois League at the center of the European contest for North America."
"Daniel Barr has given us a brilliant and powerful synthesis of the Iroquois struggles for survival and independence. Readers will be enthralled with this compelling account that places the Iroquois League at the center of the European contest for North America." - David Dixon Author of Never Come to Peace Again: Pontiac's Uprising and the Fate of the British Empire in North America
'œDaniel P. Barr's UNCONQUERED: THE IROQUOIS LEAGUE AT WAR IN COLONIAL AMERICA joins others in the 'Modern Military Tradition' series, exploring the nature of Iroquois warfare and reviewing nearly two hundred years of conflict during colonial times in this country. The Iroquois conducted wars against the French, English, Americans and others: from economic consequences of rivalries to the foundations of war which dictated Iroquois League manners, UNCONQUERED provides a scholarly review of history and cultural influences and is a 'must' for any surveying Native American culture and patterns of war.'' California Bookwatch
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, January 2007
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Summaries
Long Description
Unconquered explores the complex world of Iroquois warfare, providing a narrative overview of nearly two hundred years of Iroquois conflict during the colonial era of North America. Detailing Iroquois wars against the French, English, Americans, and a host of Indian enemies, Unconquered builds upon decades of modern scholarship to reveal the vital importance of warfare in Iroquois society and culture, at the same time exploring the diverse motivations that guided Iroquois warfare. Economic competition and rivalry for trade were important factors in Iroquois warfare, but they often provided less motivation for waging war than Iroquoian spiritual and cultural beliefs, including the important tradition of the "mourning war." Nor were European agendas particularly important to Iroquois warfare, except in that they occasionally coincided with Iroquois designs. Europeans influenced and incited, both directly and indirectly, conflict within the Iroquois League and with other Indian nations, but the peoples of the Iroquois League waged war according to their own cultural beliefs and by their own rules. In reality, the Iroquoi League rarely waged war against anyone. Rather its individual member nations drove the warfare often attributed to the whole, creating a shifting, amorphous political and military position that allowed member nations to pursue separate policies of war and peace against common foes and multiple enemies. Unconquered also seeks to dispel longstanding beliefs about the invincible Iroquois "empire," myths that have been dispelled by focused academic studies, but still retain a powerful resonance among popular conceptions of the Iroquois League. While the Iroquois createdfar-reaching networks of trade and destroyed or dispersed Indian peoples along their borders, they created no expansive territorial empires. Nor were Iroquois warriors unequaled in battle. Europeans, Americans, and Indians defeated Iroquois warriors and burned Iroquois villages as often as they tasted defeat, and on more than one occasion they brought the Iroquois League to the brink of utter ruin. Yet the Iroquois were never completely destroyed. Because they waged war as individual members of a loosely united, voluntary league, rather than as a unified political state, they remained unconquered, retaining influence and power longer than any other native nation in North America, and providing for their exulted status in the history of American Indian peoples during the age of European colonization.
Unpaid Annotation
War was a complex, vital component of Iroquois culture that was at times an almost daily part of life. While economic competition and rivalry for trade were important factors in Iroquois warfare, the Iroquois waged wars for a variety of reasons, many of which originated from within their own culture. To be clear, Europeans influenced and incited, both directly and indirectly, conflict with the Iroquois League and other Indian nations, but the Iroquois waged these wars according to their own cultural beliefs and by their own rules.
Long Description
Unconquered explores the complex world of Iroquois warfare, providing a narrative overview of nearly two hundred years of Iroquois conflict during the colonial era of North America. Detailing Iroquois wars against the French, English, Americans, and a host of Indian enemies, Unconquered builds upon decades of modern scholarship to reveal the vital importance of warfare in Iroquois society and culture, at the same time exploring the diverse motivations that guided Iroquois warfare. Economic competition and rivalry for trade were important factors in Iroquois warfare, but they often provided less motivation for waging war than Iroquoian spiritual and cultural beliefs, including the important tradition of the "mourning war." Nor were European agendas particularly important to Iroquois warfare, except in that they occasionally coincided with Iroquois designs. Europeans influenced and incited, both directly and indirectly, conflict within the Iroquois League and with other Indian nations, but the peoples of the Iroquois League waged war according to their own cultural beliefs and by their own rules. In reality, the Iroquoi League rarely waged war against anyone. Rather its individual member nations drove the warfare often attributed to the whole, creating a shifting, amorphous political and military position that allowed member nations to pursue separate policies of war and peace against common foes and multiple enemies. Unconquered also seeks to dispel longstanding beliefs about the invincible Iroquois "empire," myths that have been dispelled by focused academic studies, but still retain a powerful resonance among popular conceptions of the Iroquois League. While the Iroquois created far-reaching networks of trade and destroyed or dispersed Indian peoples along their borders, they created no expansive territorial empires. Nor were Iroquois warriors unequaled in battle. Europeans, Americans, and Indians defeated Iroquois warriors and burned Iroquois villages as often as they tasted defeat, and on more than one occasion they brought the Iroquois League to the brink of utter ruin. Yet the Iroquois were never completely destroyed. Because they waged war as individual members of a loosely united, voluntary league, rather than as a unified political state, they remained unconquered, retaining influence and power longer than any other native nation in North America, and providing for their exulted status in the history of American Indian peoples during the age of European colonization.
Long Description
Unconquered explores the complex world of Iroquois warfare, providing a narrative overview of nearly two hundred years of Iroquois conflict during the colonial era of North America. Detailing Iroquois wars against the French, English, Americans, and a host of Indian enemies, Unconquered builds upon decades of modern scholarship to reveal the vital importance of warfare in Iroquois society and culture, at the same time exploring the diverse motivationsespecially Iroquoian spiritual and cultural beliefsthat guided such warfare. Economic competition and rivalry for trade were important factors in Iroquois warfare, but they often provided less motivation for waging war than Iroquoian spiritual and cultural beliefs, including the important tradition of the mourning war. Nor were European agendas particularly important to Iroquois warfare, except in that they occasionally coincided with Iroquois designs. Europeans influenced and incited, both directly and indirectly, conflict within the Iroquois League and with other Indian nations, but the peoples of the Iroquois League waged war according to their own cultural beliefs and by their own rules. In reality, the Iroquoi League rarely waged war against anyone. Rather its individual member nations drove the warfare often attributed to the whole, creating a shifting, amorphous political and military position that allowed member nations to pursue separate policies of war and peace against common foes and multiple enemies. Unconquered also seeks to dispel longstanding beliefs about the invincible Iroquois empire, myths that have been dispelled by focused academic studies, but still retain a powerful resonance among popular conceptions of the Iroquois League. While the Iroquois created far-reaching networks of trade and destroyed or dispersed Indian peoples along their borders, they created no expansive territorial empires. Nor were Iroquois warriors unequaled in battle. Europeans, Americans, and Indians defeated Iroquois warriors and burned Iroquois villages as often as they tasted defeat, and on more than one occasion they brought the Iroquois League to the brink of utter ruin. Yet the Iroquois were never completely destroyed.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The Iroquois waged wars for a variety of reasons; while economic competition and rivalry for trade were important factors in Iroquois warfare, so were elements within their own culture. This book gives an overview of Iroquois warfare and explores major conflicts.
Table of Contents
Prologue
The Wars of the Iroquois Born from Blood Guns and Furs
The Great Mourning War
The Longhouse under Siege
The Long Neutrality
The Longhouse Divided
The Longhouse in Flames
Epilogue: The Longhouse Endures
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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