Catalogue


Local religion in colonial Mexico /
[edited by] Martin Austin Nesvig.
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico, 2006.
description
xxvii, 289 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0826334024 (pbk. : alk. paper), 9780826334022 (pbk. : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
series title
imprint
Albuquerque : University of New Mexico, 2006.
isbn
0826334024 (pbk. : alk. paper)
9780826334022 (pbk. : alk. paper)
contents note
The concept of popular religion / Carlos M.N. Eire -- Icons of devotion : the appropriation and use of saints in New Spain / Antonio Rubial García -- The "Indian question" and the case of Tlatelolco / rartin Austin Nesvig -- Between Nativitas and Mexico City : an eighteenth-century pastor's local religion / William B. Taylor -- Autonomy, honor, and the ancestors : native local religion in seventeenth-century Oaxaca / David Tavárez -- Carriers of saints : traveling alms collectors and Nahua gender roles / Edward W. Osowski -- Confraternities and community : the decline of the communal quest for salvation in eighteenth-century Mexico City / Brian Larkin -- Routes to respectability : confraternities and men of African descent in New Spain / Nicole von Germeten -- Voices from a living hell : slavery, death, and salvation in a Mexican obraje / Javier Villa-Flores -- Catholicisms / William Christian, Jr.
catalogue key
5843379
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2007-04-01:
Editor Nesvig (Univ. of Miami) presents 10 articles on religious culture in colonial Mexico in a volume designed for use by students and scholars. Three essays grapple with theoretical and methodological issues, and the others are case studies. Nesvig does not attempt comprehensive coverage either chronologically or topically. The 17th and 18th centuries have the best coverage. Topics include how Spanish and indigenous groups related to the cult of the saints; clergy-lay tensions; and how religious practices could reflect group identity or promote social status. The essays demonstrate that religious beliefs and practices were neither monolithic nor consistent across space and time in colonial Mexico. Most of the authors are historians, but the disciplines of sociology, philosophy, religious studies, and anthropology are also represented. For students, the volume presents some current topics and themes in the study of local religion in colonial Mexico; it also provides an introduction to the complex challenges of definition, terminology, and methodology faced by scholars researching popular religion. The book has a glossary and index but no general bibliography. Each article, however, has extensive notes, which will serve the needs of both students and specialists. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. V. H. Cummins Austin College
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Choice, April 2007
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Summaries
Main Description
The ten essays in 'Local Religion in Colonial Mexico' provide information about the religious culture in colonial Mexico. Carlos Eire's essay begins the study with the meaning of 'popular religion' in colonial Mexico. Antonio Rubial Garcia looks at the use of icons. Martin Austin Nesvig's essay discusses Tlatelolco, a city near Tenochtitlan and the site of Mexico's college for Indian education where the Indians studied classical Latin, Spanish grammar, and Catholic theology in preparation for the priesthood. William Taylor's writing uses an eighteenth-century Franciscan friar to demonstrate that priests transferred their own religion and networks of authority, power, and knowledge into their pastoral service. David Tavarez uses examples from Oaxaca to show seventeenth-century Zapotecs were not willing converts to Catholicism, preferring to retain the 'idolatrous' beliefs of their ancestors. Edward Osowski presents the stories of two Nahua alms collectors who also served as spiritual leaders in their respective villages of colonial Mexico. Brian Larkin's essay discusses how eighteenth-century Mexico City Catholics gradually lost their belief that earthly prayers could help an individual's soul enter heaven. Nicole von Germeten tells how men of African heritage accepted the country's religious beliefs. Javier Villa-Flores analyses the ways masters and slaves made use of Christian dogma to live with the harsh institution of slavery. The final essay, by William Christian Jr, examines the different 'Catholicisms' that exist in the world.
Main Description
The ten essays in Local Religion in Colonial Mexicoprovide information about the religious culture in colonial Mexico. Carlos Eire's essay begins the study with the meaning of "popular religion" in colonial Mexico. Antonio Rubial García looks at the use of icons. Martin Austin Nesvig's essay discusses Tlatelolco, a city near Tenochtitlan and the site of Mexico's college for Indian education where the Indians studied classical Latin, Spanish grammar, and Catholic theology in preparation for the priesthood. William Taylor's writing uses an eighteenth-century Franciscan friar to demonstrate that priests transferred their own religion and networks of authority, power, and knowledge into their pastoral service. David Tavárez uses examples from Oaxaca to show seventeenth-century Zapotecs were not willing converts to Catholicism, preferring to retain the "idolatrous" beliefs of their ancestors. Edward Osowski presents the stories of two Nahua alms collectors who also served as spiritual leaders in their respective villages of colonial Mexico. Brian Larkin's essay discusses how eighteenth-century Mexico City Catholics gradually lost their belief that earthly prayers could help an individual's soul enter heaven. Nicole von Germeten tells how men of African heritage accepted the country's religious beliefs. Javier Villa-Flores analyzes the ways masters and slaves made use of Christian dogma to live with the harsh institution of slavery. The final essay, by William Christian, Jr., examines the different "Catholicisms" that exist in the world. "As the first collection of essays on local religion in Colonial Mexico, this volume sets a high standard for the quality of its contributions and the variety of its contents. A discussion of the concept of local religion is followed by eight fascinating case studies from various regions of colonial Mexico, spanning from the mid-sixteenth to the late eighteenth centuries. The essays refer to numerous ethnic groups and cultures. Each essay represents the richness and complexity of Mexican history. William Christian, known for his work on the local religion of Spain, provides a final reflection on the topic for New Spain. This book is bound to benefit students and scholars of history and religion, and to make us think more about local religion in Mexico today."--Kevin Terraciano, Associate Professor of History, UCLA
Long Description
The ten essays in "Local Religion in Colonial Mexico" provide information about the religious culture in colonial Mexico. Carlos Eire's essay begins the study with the meaning of "popular religion" in colonial Mexico. Antonio Rubial Garca looks at the use of icons. Martin Austin Nesvig's essay discusses Tlatelolco, a city near Tenochtitlan and the site of Mexico's college for Indian education where the Indians studied classical Latin, Spanish grammar, and Catholic theology in preparation for the priesthood. William Taylor's writing uses an eighteenth-century Franciscan friar to demonstrate that priests transferred their own religion and networks of authority, power, and knowledge into their pastoral service. David Tavrez uses examples from Oaxaca to show seventeenth-century Zapotecs were not willing converts to Catholicism, preferring to retain the "idolatrous" beliefs of their ancestors. Edward Osowski presents the stories of two Nahua alms collectors who also served as spiritual leaders in their respective villages of colonial Mexico. Brian Larkin's essay discusses how eighteenth-century Mexico City Catholics gradually lost their belief that earthly prayers could help an individuals soul enter heaven. Nicole von Germeten tells how men of African heritage accepted the countrys religious beliefs. Javier Villa-Flores analyzes the ways masters and slaves made use of Christian dogma to live with the harsh institution of slavery. The final essay, by William Christian, Jr., examines the different "Catholicisms" that exist in the world.Contributors: William Christian, Jr., independent scholar Carlos M. N. Eire, Riggs Professor ofHistory and Religious Studies, Yale University Brian Larkin, assistant professor of history, St. John's University, Minnesota Edward W. Osowski, independent scholar and a Nahuatl expert living in Montreal Antonio Rubial Garca, professor of philosophy, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico David Tavrez, assistant professor of history, Vassar College, New York William B. Taylor, Muriel McKevitt Sonne Chair in History, University of California, Berkeley Javier Villa-Flores, assistant professor of history, University of Illinois, Chicago Nicole Von Germeten, assistant professor of history, Oregon State University"As the first collection of essays on local religion in Colonial Mexico, this volume sets a high standard for the quality of its contributions and the variety of its contents. A discussion of the concept of local religion is followed by eight fascinating case studies from various regions of colonial Mexico, spanning from the mid-sixteenth to the late eighteenth centuries. The essays refer to numerous ethnic groups and cultures. Each essay represents the richness and complexity of Mexican history. William Christian, known for his work on the local religion of Spain, provides a final reflection on the topic for New Spain. This book is bound to benefit students and scholars of history and religion, and to make us think more about local religion in Mexico today."--Kevin Terraciano, Associate Professor of History, UCLA
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. xi
Acknowledgmentsp. xiii
Introductionp. xvii
The Concept of Popular Religionp. 1
Icons of Devotion: The Appropriation and Use of Saints in New Spainp. 37
The "Indian Question" and the Case of Tlatelolcop. 63
Between Nativitas and Mexico City: An Eighteenth-Century Pastor's Local Religionp. 91
Autonomy, Honor, and the Ancestors: Native Local Religion in Seventeenth-Century Oaxacap. 119
Carriers of Saints: Traveling Alms Collectors and Nahua Gender Rolesp. 155
Confraternities and Community: The Decline of the Communal Quest for Salvation in Eighteenth-Century Mexico Cityp. 189
Routes to Respectability: Confraternities and Men of African Descent in New Spainp. 215
Voices from a Living Hell: Slavery, Death, and Salvation in a Mexican Obrajep. 235
Catholicismsp. 259
Glossaryp. 269
Contributorsp. 275
Indexp. 278
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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