Catalogue


Theories of judgment : psychology, logic, phenomenology /
Wayne M. Martin.
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
description
xiii, 188 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
ISBN
0521840430 (hbk.)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2006.
isbn
0521840430 (hbk.)
standard identifier
9780521840439 (hbk.)
catalogue key
5842658
 
Includes bibliographical references (p. 174-181) and index.
A Look Inside
Summaries
Main Description
The exercise of judgement is an aspect of human endeavour from our most mundane acts to our most momentous decisions. In this book Wayne Martin develops a historical survey of theoretical approaches to judgement, focusing on treatments of judgement in psychology, logic, phenomenology and painting. He traces attempts to develop theories of judgement in British Empiricism, the logical tradition stemming from Kant, nineteenth-century psychologism, recent experimental neuropsychology and the phenomenological tradition associated with Brentano, Husserl and Heidegger. His reconstruction of vibrant but largely forgotten nineteenth-century debates links Kantian approaches to judgement with twentieth-century phenomenological accounts. He also shows that the psychological, logical and phenomenological dimensions of judgement are not only equally important but fundamentally interlinked in any complete understanding of judgement. His book will interest a wide range of readers in history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and psychology.
Bowker Data Service Summary
The exercise of judgment is an aspect of human endeavour from our most mundane acts to our most momentous decisions. Martin develops a historical survey of theoretical approaches to judgment, focusing on treatments of judgment in psychology, logic, phenomenology, and painting.
Description for Bookstore
In this book Wayne Martin develops a historical survey of theoretical approaches to judgement, focusing on treatments of judgement in psychology, logic, phenomenology and painting. He traces attempts to develop theories of judgement in British Empiricism, the logical tradition stemming from Kant, nineteenth-century psychologism, recent experimental neuropsychology and the phenomenological tradition associated with Brentano, Husserl and Heidegger.
Description for Bookstore
This book ranges over British empiricism, Kantian approaches, nineteenth-century psychologicsm and the phenomenological movement to show the rich and fascinating history of theories of judgment. It will interest a wide readership in the history of philosophy, philosophy of mind, and psychology.
Description for Bookstore
This book surveys the history of theories of judgement. The author examines British empiricism, the logical tradition stemming from Kant, nineteenth-century psychologism, recent experimental neuropsychology, and the phenomenological tradition associated with Husserl and Heidegger. His reconstruction of vibrant but largely forgotten nineteenth-century debates linked Kantian approaches with twentieth-century phenomenological accounts, and he shows that the psychological, logical and phenomenological dimensions of judgment are not only equally important, but fundamentally interlinked, in any complete understanding of judgment.
Main Description
Wayne Martin traces attempts to develop theories of judgment in British Empiricism, the logical tradition stemming from Kant, nineteenth-century psychologism, recent experimental neuropsychology, and the phenomenological tradition associated with Brentano, Husserl and Heidegger. His reconstruction of vibrant but largely forgotten nineteenth-century debates links Kantian approaches to judgment with twentieth-century phenomenological accounts. He also shows that the psychological, logical and phenomenological dimensions of judgment are not only equally important, but fundamentally interlinked.
Main Description
The exercise of judgement is an aspect of human endeavour from our most mundane acts to our most momentous decisions. In this book Wayne Martin develops a historical survey of theoretical approaches to judgement, focusing on treatments of judgement in psychology, logic, phenomenology and painting. He traces attempts to develop theories of judgement in British Empiricism, the logical tradition stemming from Kant, nineteenth-century psychologism, experimental neuropsychology and the phenomenological tradition associated with Brentano, Husserl and Heidegger. His reconstruction of vibrant but largely forgotten nineteenth-century debates links Kantian approaches to judgement with twentieth-century phenomenological accounts. He also shows that the psychological, logical and phenomenological dimensions of judgement are not only equally important but fundamentally interlinked in any complete understanding of judgement. His book will interest a wide range of readers in history of philosophy, philosophy of the mind and psychology.
Table of Contents
Introduction: the faces of judgement
The psychology of judging: three experimental approaches
Judgement as synthesis, judgement as thesis: existential judgement in Kantian logics
The judgement stroke and the truth predicate: Frege and the logical representation of judgement
Heidegger and the phenomeno-logic of judgement: methods of phenomenology in he dissertation of 1913
Elements of a phenomenology of judgement: judgemental comportment in Cranach's Judgement of Paris
Bibliography
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.

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