Catalogue


Hierarchy, commerce and fraud in Bourbon Spanish America : a postal inspector's expose /
Ruth Hill.
imprint
Nashville : Vanderbilt University Press, 2005.
description
xii, 396 p.
ISBN
0826514928 (cloth : alk. paper)
format(s)
Book
Holdings
More Details
imprint
Nashville : Vanderbilt University Press, 2005.
isbn
0826514928 (cloth : alk. paper)
contents note
Mexico City v. Lima : pila, puente, pan and peines -- Defacing a Bourbon legend : Pedro, Pardo, Paulino and Perulero -- En route and in the loop : trade, metals and elites, c. 1700-1750 -- Of gods and men : Bourbon blindness and the post, c. 1750-1800 -- Before race : hierarchy in Bourbon Spanish America -- The Inca impostor unmasked : culture, controversy and Concolorcorvo -- Trial of the century : humor, rhetoric and the law.
catalogue key
5836401
 
Includes bibliographical references and index.
A Look Inside
Full Text Reviews
Appeared in Choice on 2006-07-01:
Hill's erudite critical approach to the expose "Guide for Blind Rovers" (1775) by Alonso Carrio de Lavandera analyzes a work that is very difficult to classify, as it falls between the genres of the picaresque novel and Voltaire's critical essay style. This is the best-known work in the Spanish colonies in the 18th century. Carrio, a postal inspector, became involved in efforts to contain corruption during Bourbon reforms. He described how corruption contributed to the development of Buenos Aires and the collapse of Lima. The historical part is a biographical study of the career of Archbishop Pedro Pardo Figueroa and an expose of his involvement in the illegal activities of his associates and relatives. Hill (Spanish, Univ. of Virginia) explores the connections between the illegal trade in silk and other articles from the Orient and the diversion of gold, silver, and mercury from royal government control. She discusses the details of Carrio's inventions of his main character, Concolorcorvo, the alleged Inca scribe to whom Carrio attributed his expose. Bringing together social, literary, and intellectual history, Hill analyzes the formation of classes and hierarchy in Spanish America and traces the various legal, humanistic, and classical influences upon Carrio's satirical rhetoric. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. R. A. Santillan College of Staten Island
Reviews
Review Quotes
Richly detailed, amply documented, and wholly original, this book looks at eighteenth-century Spanish America through the dual prism of literature and history. The real focus, though, is race and class in the Spanish colonies . . . the entire field is richer and more interesting because of [Hill's] efforts. -- The Virginia Quarterly Review
Prof. Hill has delivered an extraordinarily rich piece of historical and literary scholarship. Hill offers original readings and throws new light on some of this canonical text's most hotly debated issues. Prof. Hill takes up the challenge of reading colonial writing through material cultureÂ'¦ and she delivers masterfully. --Karen Stolley, Emory University
Prof. Hill has delivered an extraordinarily rich piece of historical and literary scholarship. Hill offers original readings and throws new light on some of this canonical text's most hotly debated issues. Prof. Hill takes up the challenge of reading colonial writing through material culture… and she delivers masterfully. --Karen Stolley, Emory University
However, much of our critical understanding of this text will now have to be rethought in light of Ruth Hill's provocative new book. Hill's book not only brings into focus many previously unfathomed layers of Carrio's text but also provides a fascinating glimpse into the underworld of Bourbon officialdom - a world of sexual, social, and occupational intrigues in which racial and class identities were more complex than has generally been appreciated by literary critics. Hill argues that the proto-nationalist historiographic commonplace that has frequently been invoked in order to explain all of eighteenth-century Spanish American literary culture in terms of a conflict or rivalry between criollos and peninsulares is inadequate for an understanding not only of Carrio de Lavandera's text, but also for much of eighteenth-century Spanish American literature and culture more generally. Most immediately, however, there can be no doubt that Hill's new book stands as a model of scholarly erudition, historicist methodology, archival research for literary scholars and that if makes important critical interventions that will set the parameters for all future discussions of Carrio's text and stimulate critical debate beyond. Resenas
Richly detailed, amply documented, and wholly original, this book looks at eighteenth-century Spanish America through the dual prism of literature and history. The real focus, though, is race and class in the Spanish colonies . . . the entire field is richer and more interesting because of [Hill's] efforts. --The Virginia Quarterly Review
Prof. Hill has delivered an extraordinarily rich piece of historical and literary scholarship. Hill offers original readings and throws new light on some of this canonical text's most hotly debated issues. Prof. Hill takes up the challenge of reading colonial writing through material culture and she delivers masterfully. --Karen Stolley, Emory University
A study of great scope, depth and originality. It questions, challenges and surprises, and it cannot be disregarded by any contemporary scholar of Bourbon Spanish-America or ofLazarillo de ciegos caminantes. --Bulletin of Spanish Studies
A must read for scholars interested not only inEl lazarillo de ciegos caminantesbut also in the material reality of the Enlightenment in colonial Spanish America. ---Mariselle Melendez,Revista De Estudios Hispanicos
A must read for scholars interested not only in El lazarillo de ciegos caminantesbut also in the material reality of the Enlightenment in colonial Spanish America. ---Mariselle Melendez, Revista De Estudios Hispanicos
A study of great scope, depth and originality. It questions, challenges and surprises, and it cannot be disregarded by any contemporary scholar of Bourbon Spanish-America or of Lazarillo de ciegos caminantes. -- Bulletin of Spanish Studies
Prof. Hill has delivered an extraordinarily rich piece of historical and literary scholarship. Hill offers original readings and throws new light on some of this canonical text's most hotly debated issues. Prof. Hill takes up the challenge of reading colonial writing through material culture'¦ and she delivers masterfully. --Karen Stolley, Emory University
Prof. Hill has delivered an extraordinarily rich piece of historical and literary scholarship. Hill offers original readings and throws new light on some of this canonical text's most hotly debated issues. Prof. Hill takes up the challenge of reading colonial writing through material culture… and she delivers masterfully. --Karen Stolley, Emory University
This item was reviewed in:
Choice, July 2006
To find out how to look for other reviews, please see our guides to finding book reviews in the Sciences or Social Sciences and Humanities.
Summaries
Unpaid Annotation
Using El lazarillo de ciegos caminantes (the "Guide for Blind Rovers" by Alonso Carrio de Lavandera, the best known work of the era) as a jumping off point for a sprawling discussion of 18th-century Spanish America, Ruth Hill argues for a richer, more nuanced understanding of the relationship between Spain and its western colonies. Armed with primary sources including literature, maps, census data, letters, and diaries, Hill reveals a rich world of intrigue and artifice, where identity is surprisingly fluid and always in question. More importantly, Hill crafts a complex argument for reassessing our understanding of race and class distinctions at the time, with enormous implications for how we view conceptions of race and class today.
Long Description
Using El lazarillo de ciegos caminantes as a jumping off point for a sprawling discussion of 18th-century Spanish America, Ruth Hill argues for a richer, more nuanced understanding of the relationship between Spain and its western colonies, then crafts a complex argument for reassessing our understanding of race and class distinctions at the time, with enormous implications for how we view conceptions of race and class today.
Unpaid Annotation
In this discussion of 18th century Spanish America, Ruth Hill argues for a richer, more nuanced understanding of the relationship between Spain and its western colonies, then crafts a complex argument for reassessing our understanding of race and class distinctions at the time, with implications for how we view conceptions of race and class today.
Main Description
Using El lazarillo de ciegos caminantes(the "Guide for Blind Rovers" by Alonso Carrio de Lavandera, the best known work of the era) as a jumping off point for a sprawling discussion of 18th-century Spanish America, Ruth Hill argues for a richer, more nuanced understanding of the relationship between Spain and its western colonies. Armed with primary sources including literature, maps, census data, letters, and diaries, Hill reveals a rich world of intrigue and artifice, where identity is surprisingly fluid and always in question. More importantly, Hill crafts a complex argument for reassessing our understanding of race and class distinctions at the time, with enormous implications for how we view conceptions of race and class today.
Main Description
UsingEl lazarillo de ciegos caminantes(the "Guide for Blind Rovers" by Alonso Carrio de Lavandera, the best known work of the era) as a jumping off point for a sprawling discussion of 18th-century Spanish America, Ruth Hill argues for a richer, more nuanced understanding of the relationship between Spain and its western colonies. Armed with primary sources including literature, maps, census data, letters, and diaries, Hill reveals a rich world of intrigue and artifice, where identity is surprisingly fluid and always in question. More importantly, Hill crafts a complex argument for reassessing our understanding of race and class distinctions at the time, with enormous implications for how we view conceptions of race and class today.
Table of Contents
List of Illustrationsp. ix
Acknowledgmentsp. xi
Introductionp. 1
Mexico City versus Lima: Pila, Puente, Pan, and Peinesp. 41
Defacing a Bourbon Legend: Pedro, Pardo, Paulino, and Perulerop. 71
En Route and in the Loop: Trade, Metals, and Elites, circa 1700-1750p. 107
Of Gods and Men: Bourbon Blindness and the Post, circa 1750-1800p. 141
Before Race: Hierarchy in Bourbon Spanish Americap. 197
The Inca Impostor Unmasked: Culture, Controversy, and Concolorcorvop. 239
Trial of the Century: Humor, Rhetoric, and the Lawp. 274
Epiloguep. 305
Notesp. 311
Bibliographyp. 355
Indexp. 379
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.

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